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ADO: Why I use it

P: n/a
1. It cleans up its own garbage; No "Set RS = nothing" is required;
2. OpenSchema provides me from Code or Script any information about my
Database of which I can think;
3. The provider for Internet Publishing gives me a very slick FTP
capability without FTP;
4. Recordsets can be unattached, stroked, reattached and update-batched
5. GetString() gives me easy and fast access to my recordset as string;
6. I can review errors by examining the connection error object;
7. I can use ADO to make changes to JET tables, including the newer
field types and properties, from SQL;
8. Temporary Indexes allow me to scan recordsets very quickly;
9. SaveToFile allows me to save a recordset locally (as a file, no db
required) and to reload it later;
10. The Shaping Provider gives me hierarchically organized data without
repetition.

Do you use it?

What are your reasons?

--
--
Lyle

"The aim of those who try to control thought is always the same. They
find one single explanation of the world, one system of thought and
action that will (they believe) cover everything; and then they try to
impose that on all thinking people."
- Gilbert Highet
Nov 13 '05 #1
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5 Replies


P: n/a
On Thu, 21 Apr 2005 14:16:02 -0400, Lyle Fairfield <ly******@yahoo.ca> wrote:
1. It cleans up its own garbage; No "Set RS = nothing" is required;
2. OpenSchema provides me from Code or Script any information about my
Database of which I can think;
3. The provider for Internet Publishing gives me a very slick FTP
capability without FTP;
4. Recordsets can be unattached, stroked, reattached and update-batched
5. GetString() gives me easy and fast access to my recordset as string;
6. I can review errors by examining the connection error object;
7. I can use ADO to make changes to JET tables, including the newer
field types and properties, from SQL;
8. Temporary Indexes allow me to scan recordsets very quickly;
9. SaveToFile allows me to save a recordset locally (as a file, no db
required) and to reload it later;
10. The Shaping Provider gives me hierarchically organized data without
repetition.

Do you use it?

What are your reasons?

--


I use it often, and for many of the reasons you suggest. I still find DAO to
be a more useful default library for Access applications, but I don't avoid
using ADO when I want to do one of the above. Using both libraries in the
same has worked just fine.
Nov 13 '05 #2

P: n/a
Yes, for most of the reasons you give.

One technique I find myself using a lot is building recordsets and
populating them from non-relational data.

--
Terry Kreft
MVP Microsoft Access
"Lyle Fairfield" <ly******@yahoo.ca> wrote in message
news:n4*********************@read2.cgocable.net...
1. It cleans up its own garbage; No "Set RS = nothing" is required;
2. OpenSchema provides me from Code or Script any information about my
Database of which I can think;
3. The provider for Internet Publishing gives me a very slick FTP
capability without FTP;
4. Recordsets can be unattached, stroked, reattached and update-batched
5. GetString() gives me easy and fast access to my recordset as string;
6. I can review errors by examining the connection error object;
7. I can use ADO to make changes to JET tables, including the newer
field types and properties, from SQL;
8. Temporary Indexes allow me to scan recordsets very quickly;
9. SaveToFile allows me to save a recordset locally (as a file, no db
required) and to reload it later;
10. The Shaping Provider gives me hierarchically organized data without
repetition.

Do you use it?

What are your reasons?

--
--
Lyle

"The aim of those who try to control thought is always the same. They
find one single explanation of the world, one system of thought and
action that will (they believe) cover everything; and then they try to
impose that on all thinking people."
- Gilbert Highet

Nov 13 '05 #3

P: n/a
Lyle Fairfield <ly******@yahoo.ca> wrote in
news:n4*********************@read2.cgocable.net:
1. It cleans up its own garbage; No "Set RS = nothing" is
required;


You're saying that ADO resolves a bug in VBA?

Magical!!!!!

I'm so glad you're happy with it!

--
David W. Fenton http://www.bway.net/~dfenton
dfenton at bway dot net http://www.bway.net/~dfassoc
Nov 13 '05 #4

P: n/a
Steve Jorgensen <no****@nospam.nospam> wrote in
news:2i********************************@4ax.com:
On Thu, 21 Apr 2005 14:16:02 -0400, Lyle Fairfield
<ly******@yahoo.ca> wrote:
1. It cleans up its own garbage; No "Set RS = nothing" is
required; 2. OpenSchema provides me from Code or Script any
information about my Database of which I can think;
3. The provider for Internet Publishing gives me a very slick FTP
capability without FTP;
4. Recordsets can be unattached, stroked, reattached and
update-batched 5. GetString() gives me easy and fast access to my
recordset as string; 6. I can review errors by examining the
connection error object; 7. I can use ADO to make changes to JET
tables, including the newer field types and properties, from SQL;
8. Temporary Indexes allow me to scan recordsets very quickly;
9. SaveToFile allows me to save a recordset locally (as a file, no
db required) and to reload it later;
10. The Shaping Provider gives me hierarchically organized data
without repetition.

Do you use it?

What are your reasons?

--


I use it often, and for many of the reasons you suggest. I still
find DAO to be a more useful default library for Access
applications, but I don't avoid using ADO when I want to do one of
the above. Using both libraries in the same has worked just fine.


What's wrong with me that I never ever have any call for any of the
the capabilities above (discounting #1, of course, which can't
possible have been resolved by ADO, since it's a bug in VBA, not
DAO)?

Terry Kreft's remark about creating recordsets from non-tabular data
is the only thing I could imagine ever using, but I can't say I've
had any cases where not using ADO for that purpose put me in a
situation where I couldn't deliver a working application that was
fast and efficient.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.bway.net/~dfenton
dfenton at bway dot net http://www.bway.net/~dfassoc
Nov 13 '05 #5

P: n/a
"David W. Fenton" <dX********@bway.net.invalid> wrote in message
news:Xn**********************************@24.168.1 28.86...
Steve Jorgensen <no****@nospam.nospam> wrote in
news:2i********************************@4ax.com:
On Thu, 21 Apr 2005 14:16:02 -0400, Lyle Fairfield
<ly******@yahoo.ca> wrote:
1. It cleans up its own garbage; No "Set RS = nothing" is
required; 2. OpenSchema provides me from Code or Script any
information about my Database of which I can think;
3. The provider for Internet Publishing gives me a very slick FTP
capability without FTP;
4. Recordsets can be unattached, stroked, reattached and
update-batched 5. GetString() gives me easy and fast access to my
recordset as string; 6. I can review errors by examining the
connection error object; 7. I can use ADO to make changes to JET
tables, including the newer field types and properties, from SQL;
8. Temporary Indexes allow me to scan recordsets very quickly;
9. SaveToFile allows me to save a recordset locally (as a file, no
db required) and to reload it later;
10. The Shaping Provider gives me hierarchically organized data
without repetition.

Do you use it?

What are your reasons?

--


I use it often, and for many of the reasons you suggest. I still
find DAO to be a more useful default library for Access
applications, but I don't avoid using ADO when I want to do one of
the above. Using both libraries in the same has worked just fine.


What's wrong with me that I never ever have any call for any of the
the capabilities above (discounting #1, of course, which can't
possible have been resolved by ADO, since it's a bug in VBA, not
DAO)?

Terry Kreft's remark about creating recordsets from non-tabular data
is the only thing I could imagine ever using, but I can't say I've
had any cases where not using ADO for that purpose put me in a
situation where I couldn't deliver a working application that was
fast and efficient.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.bway.net/~dfenton
dfenton at bway dot net http://www.bway.net/~dfassoc


In my opinion David, you've become defensive without cause. Lyle certainly
never suggested that someone might be unable to "deliver a working
application that was fast and efficient" without using ADO. There are a
great many successful Access projects in use today, both with and without
the use of ADO code. Each of us makes choices of which to use (or both).
Lyle simply stated his reasons and asked others to do the same.

As for me, I work mostly with ADO. There are capabilities in ADO, several
of which Lyle mentioned, others he did not, that I like very much. There
are also features that I sorely miss from DAO. I don't have a particularly
good reason for having chosen this route. Or, at least not one based on
rational analytic comparison of the two. Five years ago, I undertook a
major new project with Access and was forced to make a choice. At the time,
all of the books were echoing Microsoft's position of the day, that DAO was
going away and would be replaced with ADO. We all know now, of course, how
valid that prediction was. But, good choice or bad, I got put in the ADO
camp.

My 2 cents worth,
Randy Harris
Nov 13 '05 #6

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