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Unbound form

P: n/a
Hi all,

To ease load on a network i close automatically form open
with a timer reset by user actions.

If the time is expired i go through the collections
of form and table and close all those that are open.

I choose this way to avoid putting code in each form, plus i can close all
open table if any
Is that correct? i am wondering if by cycling through the collections
(allforms, alltables) i put extra load on the network?
regards
Pierre
Nov 13 '05 #1
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4 Replies


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"Pierre" <pf@arobas.net> wrote in message
news:rn*********************@wagner.videotron.net. ..
Hi all,

To ease load on a network i close automatically form open
with a timer reset by user actions.

If the time is expired i go through the collections
of form and table and close all those that are open.

I choose this way to avoid putting code in each form, plus i can close all
open table if any
Is that correct? i am wondering if by cycling through the collections
(allforms, alltables) i put extra load on the network?


A form or table that is left open might possibly impose some locks that your
method would get rid of, but I doubt that they would be producing any network
traffic if the user was not actively doing something with them.

My advice would be to not bother. The way to reduce network traffic in Access
is to make sure that forms and reports pull as few records as possible and
implement proper indexes, not by closing forms as quickly as possible.

--
I don't check the Email account attached
to this message. Send instead to...
RBrandt at Hunter dot com
Nov 13 '05 #2

P: n/a
My advice would be to not bother. The way to reduce network traffic in Access
is to make sure that forms and reports pull as few records as possible and
implement proper indexes, not by closing forms as quickly as possible.


I agree with Rick.
It's also important that each user has his/hers own *local* Frontend.
This reduces network traffic when loading the forms/reports
and also reduces the chance of your db getting 'corrupted'.

--
Arno R
Nov 13 '05 #3

P: n/a
Hi all,

Thanks for the answer.
What do you mean by a form and report pulling as few record as possible?

Do you mean i should not open a form that access a whole database?

Like always using a filter to select a subset of the database?

I am looking for advise to ease the load on a network.
Can you give some trick?
"Rick Brandt" <ri*********@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:89****************@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com ...
"Pierre" <pf@arobas.net> wrote in message
news:rn*********************@wagner.videotron.net. ..
Hi all,

To ease load on a network i close automatically form open
with a timer reset by user actions.

If the time is expired i go through the collections
of form and table and close all those that are open.

I choose this way to avoid putting code in each form, plus i can close all open table if any
Is that correct? i am wondering if by cycling through the collections
(allforms, alltables) i put extra load on the network?
A form or table that is left open might possibly impose some locks that

your method would get rid of, but I doubt that they would be producing any network traffic if the user was not actively doing something with them.

My advice would be to not bother. The way to reduce network traffic in Access is to make sure that forms and reports pull as few records as possible and
implement proper indexes, not by closing forms as quickly as possible.

--
I don't check the Email account attached
to this message. Send instead to...
RBrandt at Hunter dot com

Nov 13 '05 #4

P: n/a
Hi,

I have seen some examples or discussions that only load few records at
a time.

One method is to load using a filter. For that you need to know the
range of an indexed field.

One notion has to do with the datasheet view. Say the screen can hold
25 records at a time. Load fifty. Get the count of records to modify
the scrollbar thumb. If/when the user scrolls to view record 26, load
51-75. Then, when you have the form open, you will have three
recordsets open, to use the Access record bound form. If the user uses
the scrollbar to navigate, then perhaps it is key to have a popup with
letters, say, to not update the form scrolling until the scrollbar
thumb is released.

So, if you know how many records there are, then you could divide them
into the blocks of records that fit on the screen, and just keep a
previous and next recordset, and set the recordset to the previous or
next as the user scrolls, with the one going off the page closed and
opened as the new recordset.

That would be more transaction heavy on the database, and the bound
form probably already does much of that. To modify the scrollbar
probably would require getting the HWND and hooking the message pump.
I don't know.

I like to use the unbound forms, because it is more similar to what the
implementation of the web page database access is. If you use Access
to enforce referential integrity, and change to a backend that doesn't
support that, then you have to enforce it yourself anyways.

Especially if you use a separate unbound form to add the record, and
the continuous form only for viewing the records as read-only, then you
can use INSERT or open the RecordSet using the dbAppendOnly third
option, with the Dynaset and _not_ the Table nor Snapshot. For
editing, the unbound form does not lock the record in the database. I
have read examples that have in each table row a modification
timestamp, where the unbounded form(s) are used to edit a record, and
then if it doesn't match the timestamp when it is to modify the
table(s)'s record(s), to inform the user for cancel, review, or store
for later reconciliation options.

Those are some ideas, I can't say how well they would work. Access is
a great tool, many environments do not have the bound forms. The OLE
DB DAO Dynaset does a lot of the network performance improvement
automatically.

Is that wrong? I am not an Access expert.

With warm regards,

Ross

Nov 13 '05 #5

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