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When to use .MDE's

P: n/a

I am building an application using Access 2002.
It will consist of two .mdb's, one for the data tables only and the
other will be for the forms, queries, reports, macros, & modules only.

I know the .mde won't let users get to the external modules section of
the container, which provides security. Can they get to the code behind
the forms in an .mde?

Should both of them be .mde files?
What would be the performance advantage of users running one or both as
.mde's as opposed to them both being .mdb's

Thanks for the help.
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Nov 13 '05 #1
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Ron Nolan wrote:
I am building an application using Access 2002.
It will consist of two .mdb's, one for the data tables only and the
other will be for the forms, queries, reports, macros, & modules only.

I know the .mde won't let users get to the external modules section of
the container, which provides security. Can they get to the code
behind the forms in an .mde?
No.
Should both of them be .mde files?
Making the back end an MDE only accomplishes one thing which is that a user
would no longer be able to create a new code-based object (form, report,
module) in that file. It does nothing to protect your tables or data so
most don't bother.
What would be the performance advantage of users running one or both
as mde's as opposed to them both being .mdb's


The performance advantage of and MDE is that you know that no portions of
the code can ever get uncompiled (which makes them run slower the first time
they run). If you always made sure that the MDB were fully compiled before
distribution then this should be a non-issue, but MDB can go from fully
compiled to NOT being fully compiled during use which is impossible in an
MDE.

A tid-bit advantage to an MDE is that runtime errors will cause all public
variables to be reset in an MDB, but not in an MDE. Whether that is
important or not would depend on how much you utilize public varaibles and
how much of an issue it would be to have them reset.

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Nov 13 '05 #2

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