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conditional on a form already being opened

P: n/a
I have a form in my database that is password protected, and several
forms contain buttons that open the password protected page. Each
button asks for the password, but I dont want access to ask the user
for the password if the form that is protected is already open. Is
there a way to do this?
Thanks
Dan

Nov 13 '05 #1
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4 Replies


P: n/a
Generally, protecting a form with a password is a user-written approach to
security and it would be difficult for us to comment on something that
someone else has done. In general, I can comment that such "security lite"
is usually trivial for a knowledgeable party to penetrate. Also in general,
if you record in a table that exists in the user's copy of the Front End
that the user has supplied the password, you can simply check that and open
the form; if the user has not, then you can ask for the password.

But do bear in mind that this level of security does little but give a false
sense of security.

If you use Access' own security mechanism (that is a non-trivial
undertaking), the user will provide his/her password once when the
application begins and you could test the User or security Group membership
to determine whether to open the form. Access security can be broken but it
is not trivial to do so.

Larry Linson
Microsoft Access MVP
"dvorett" <da********@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:11**********************@z14g2000cwz.googlegr oups.com...
I have a form in my database that is password protected, and several
forms contain buttons that open the password protected page. Each
button asks for the password, but I dont want access to ask the user
for the password if the form that is protected is already open. Is
there a way to do this?
Thanks
Dan

Nov 13 '05 #2

P: n/a
DFS
Larry Linson wrote:
Generally, protecting a form with a password is a user-written
approach to security and it would be difficult for us to comment on
something that someone else has done. In general, I can comment that
such "security lite" is usually trivial for a knowledgeable party to
penetrate. Also in general, if you record in a table that exists in
the user's copy of the Front End that the user has supplied the
password, you can simply check that and open the form; if the user
has not, then you can ask for the password.

But do bear in mind that this level of security does little but give
a false sense of security.

If you use Access' own security mechanism (that is a non-trivial
undertaking), the user will provide his/her password once when the
application begins and you could test the User or security Group
membership to determine whether to open the form. Access security can
be broken but it is not trivial to do so.

? Access security is a freakin' joke. I think an MVP of all people should
know that.

This $45 program will let you drop an .mdb, .mde, or .mdw file on a panel,
and returns a list of all users, their groups, and every password in the
system.

http://www.lostpassword.com/access.htm

Heck, I use the trial download version from time to time when I'm blocking
on an old password.


Larry Linson
Microsoft Access MVP
"dvorett" <da********@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:11**********************@z14g2000cwz.googlegr oups.com...
I have a form in my database that is password protected, and several
forms contain buttons that open the password protected page. Each
button asks for the password, but I dont want access to ask the user
for the password if the form that is protected is already open. Is
there a way to do this?
Thanks
Dan

Nov 13 '05 #3

P: n/a
> ? Access security is a freakin' joke. I think an MVP of all people should
know that.


Why?
Nov 13 '05 #4

P: n/a
rkc
Lyle Fairfield wrote:
? Access security is a freakin' joke. I think an MVP of all people
should
know that.

Why?


Because they are valuable and professional.

Mostly.
Nov 13 '05 #5

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