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How can I tell if file on linux box is moving across my LAN?

P: n/a
MLH
For simplicity, lets call my linux box L and my Windows box W.
Both are nodes on the LAN. Here are the knowns:

1) I have an MS Access app that automates sending of eMail
containing driver license scans for ID documentation to certified
recipients. It is a fee-based service.
2) L has SMTP mail service on it
3) W has outlook express mail client s'ware configured to use
POP & SMTP services on L
4) L has a 50K bitmap graphic file on it that I want to include
as an attachment to an eMail I am creating on W.
5) The file system in which the bitmap graphic is stored looks
like a directory to my Windows box and is seen as z:\ by W.

So I just type the full path & filespec as follows
z:\mydir\mybitmap.jpg
into outlook express' ATTACH: field and VOILA - there she goes.

QUESTION: When I click SEND, does the 50K graphic move across
the LAN from L to W, become attached to the eMail, then move again
from W to L and finally out the SMTP gateway?

My gut feeling is NO, it does not. Short of using a protocol analyzer
to snoop the wire, can any of you suggest a technique that will
proove my hypothesis right or wrong?

Normally, I wouldn't give this topic a second thought. But now, every
two days, I have 1000 of these transmissions and the rate is climbing.
It may become a source of congestion at a future point in time.

Nov 13 '05 #1
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P: n/a
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

I believe the email client retrieves the attachment and attaches it to
the email & then sends the completed email to the email server.

If you're worried about back-and-forth congestion, why not just copy the
image to the W box?

--
MGFoster:::mgf00 <at> earthlink <decimal-point> net
Oakland, CA (USA)

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
Version: PGP for Personal Privacy 5.0
Charset: noconv

iQA/AwUBQlw79oechKqOuFEgEQLeIACfXPmWMaSJhgwzy27e0kc2Q1 sNww4AoJ4H
mv+QBbs5OmtsoDfC3l30/XbE
=x1DR
-----END PGP SIGNATURE-----

MLH wrote:
For simplicity, lets call my linux box L and my Windows box W.
Both are nodes on the LAN. Here are the knowns:

1) I have an MS Access app that automates sending of eMail
containing driver license scans for ID documentation to certified
recipients. It is a fee-based service.
2) L has SMTP mail service on it
3) W has outlook express mail client s'ware configured to use
POP & SMTP services on L
4) L has a 50K bitmap graphic file on it that I want to include
as an attachment to an eMail I am creating on W.
5) The file system in which the bitmap graphic is stored looks
like a directory to my Windows box and is seen as z:\ by W.

So I just type the full path & filespec as follows
z:\mydir\mybitmap.jpg
into outlook express' ATTACH: field and VOILA - there she goes.

QUESTION: When I click SEND, does the 50K graphic move across
the LAN from L to W, become attached to the eMail, then move again
from W to L and finally out the SMTP gateway?

My gut feeling is NO, it does not. Short of using a protocol analyzer
to snoop the wire, can any of you suggest a technique that will
proove my hypothesis right or wrong?

Normally, I wouldn't give this topic a second thought. But now, every
two days, I have 1000 of these transmissions and the rate is climbing.
It may become a source of congestion at a future point in time.

Nov 13 '05 #2

P: n/a
MLH
It looks like I may have to do that. But I was trying to create an
environment in which the image file would not have to cross the
LAN at all when attached to an eMail. If on the W box, it will
definitely have to cross the LAN on its way to the SMTP gateway.

Crossing the wire once is better than twice, but ZERO was my
goal. Dunno if I can attain that.
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

I believe the email client retrieves the attachment and attaches it to
the email & then sends the completed email to the email server.

If you're worried about back-and-forth congestion, why not just copy the
image to the W box?


Nov 13 '05 #3

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