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Database structure documentation

P: n/a
How can I take an existing Access database and document its structure?
I want to show fields, relationships, and indexes so that a real DBA
could recreate the database from scratch.

Nov 13 '05 #1
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The easiest way is to use Access' built in methods. Open the database,
select Tools | Analyze | Documenter.

Hope this helps

David Hodgkins, MCSD, MCDBA, MCSE
JSTAR Software Solutions
4402 Sweet Cherry Ln.
Kalamazoo, MI 49004
www.jstarsoftware.com - Home of AutoCompact for Access Databases
269-382-2931
<jt******@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:11**********************@f14g2000cwb.googlegr oups.com...
How can I take an existing Access database and document its structure?
I want to show fields, relationships, and indexes so that a real DBA
could recreate the database from scratch.

Nov 13 '05 #2

P: n/a
I was hoping for something easy, like a third part tool that wouldn't
break the budget.

I had no idea that it would be that easy (or cheap).

I'm sitting here grinning at the quick and free solution.

John

Nov 13 '05 #3

P: n/a
jt******@gmail.com wrote:
How can I take an existing Access database and document its structure?
I want to show fields, relationships, and indexes so that a real DBA
could recreate the database from scratch.

You know its true that Access has built in documentation. And there are
software options that will read the tables and regurgitate the table and
field defs. But depending on your objective, I don't find documentation
on paper of information you could easily get by opening a copy of the
Access database to be very valuable. I would prefer a copy of the
database and Access software and be able to view whatever I want. And
yes "real DBAs" look down on Access, but if challenged, I would guess
they could open an access database long enough to extract the database
table & field definitions.

If your objective is to upsize it to SQL server, Microsoft has tools for
that.

If your objective is to document to help another person maintain the
application, I believe that documentation of Modules is important -
explanations of what they do and comments in the code. Also
documentation of code behind forms can also be very helpful. Also
helpful is techniques used that may not be immediately obvious;
conventions used, etc. Unfortunately these are things you can't automate.

Bob
Nov 13 '05 #4

P: n/a
On Wed, 06 Apr 2005 11:19:52 -0500, Bob Alston
<tu****************@cox.net> wrote:
jt******@gmail.com wrote:
How can I take an existing Access database and document its structure?
I want to show fields, relationships, and indexes so that a real DBA
could recreate the database from scratch.
You know its true that Access has built in documentation. And there are
software options that will read the tables and regurgitate the table and
field defs. But depending on your objective, I don't find documentation
on paper of information you could easily get by opening a copy of the
Access database to be very valuable. I would prefer a copy of the
database and Access software and be able to view whatever I want. And
yes "real DBAs" look down on Access, but if challenged, I would guess
they could open an access database long enough to extract the database
table & field definitions.


Indeed. Most of the "real DBA's" I have known over the last 25 years
have been pompous, self-infatuated jerks. Geeks with few redeeming
social graces and few rationally justified opinions about systems they
don't know.
If your objective is to upsize it to SQL server, Microsoft has tools for
that.

If your objective is to document to help another person maintain the
application, I believe that documentation of Modules is important -
explanations of what they do and comments in the code. Also
documentation of code behind forms can also be very helpful. Also
helpful is techniques used that may not be immediately obvious;
conventions used, etc. Unfortunately these are things you can't automate.

Bob


Nov 13 '05 #5

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