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Usernames, Passwords, and User Levels

P: n/a
I'm Creating a database in access which needs different levels of
users. The highest being allowed to see and access everything,
including code, like admin. The next being allowed to see and use
everything except the code, high level users. and finally some users
who are only able to see and write to certain things.

Would i be best to use access's own security system, remembering that
there will be a huge amount of users, possibly near the 500 mark? Or
would i be better off using my own form which check's the username
against a password in a table, and if so how would i do this?

Also if i was using the latter method, using my own tables, would i
have to store the username and level in a global variable for the time
they are logged into the database, to allow them access to certain
parts of it, if so how is this done?

Cheers teddyparnell

Nov 13 '05 #1
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P: n/a
Use Acces' user-security. Read the Security FAQ

http://support.microsoft.com/default...b;en-us;207793

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MGFoster:::mgf00 <at> earthlink <decimal-point> net
Oakland, CA (USA)

te**********@hotmail.com wrote:
I'm Creating a database in access which needs different levels of
users. The highest being allowed to see and access everything,
including code, like admin. The next being allowed to see and use
everything except the code, high level users. and finally some users
who are only able to see and write to certain things.

Would i be best to use access's own security system, remembering that
there will be a huge amount of users, possibly near the 500 mark? Or
would i be better off using my own form which check's the username
against a password in a table, and if so how would i do this?

Also if i was using the latter method, using my own tables, would i
have to store the username and level in a global variable for the time
they are logged into the database, to allow them access to certain
parts of it, if so how is this done?

Cheers teddyparnell

Nov 13 '05 #2

P: n/a
<te**********@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:11*********************@g14g2000cwa.googlegro ups.com...
I'm Creating a database in access which needs different levels of
users. The highest being allowed to see and access everything,
including code, like admin. The next being allowed to see and use
everything except the code, high level users. and finally some users
who are only able to see and write to certain things.

Would i be best to use access's own security system, remembering that
there will be a huge amount of users, possibly near the 500 mark? Or
would i be better off using my own form which check's the username
against a password in a table, and if so how would i do this?

Also if i was using the latter method, using my own tables, would i
have to store the username and level in a global variable for the time
they are logged into the database, to allow them access to certain
parts of it, if so how is this done?

Cheers teddyparnell


500 users? Concurrent users? This is way past even the theoretical limit
for Access, or is the back-end data not stored in an mdb format? Perhaps
you could give us a few more details about how you access the data - is it
via lan, wan or internet? Standard Access applications which use the only
the Jet database engine might support 10, 15, 20 concurrent users - perhaps
more, but by this point you should be considering migrating the data to a
more robust format.
As to security, you should know that Access security is fundementally flawed
(there are public cracks available) and using your own security is only
meaningful if the tables have been properly secured - and this is impossible
with Access.
Nov 13 '05 #3

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