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Securing a single table - what are the options?

P: n/a
I have never had a need to use Access' built in security. Now a client
has requested that one particular table be available only to a specific
user. (It happens to be information that's really not all that
critical, it's one of those silly requests... so I don't really mind a
mickey-mouse kind of implementation)

I would appreciate some recommendations for how to implement this.
1. Can Access security accomodate this?
2. Should I simply put a password for opening the form and assume no
user is smart enough to open the table?

(Oh, you wanted me to actually remove the games from your laptop? I
thought you just wanted me to hide them, I didn't know you didn't want
your ten-year-old son to be able to find them...)

3. What are good choices for handling problems with the password?
Should I allow a system administrator to reset it, which means, in
effect, that he/she can open the form or table?

We are not up to fingerprint ID or anything like that, so it's strictly
passwords at this point. Secret question that has to be answered?
Even that's not guaranteed, I know I write all mine down, because, for
example, I would never remember if I wrote the actual city for city of
birth, or the nearby suburb that we lived in...

All suggestions much appreciated.

I'm staying with Access 97, BTW, until I hear some really convincing
reason to upgrade...

Nov 13 '05 #1
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P: n/a
This may sound like nit-picking to your client, but it looks to me as if you
need to get a little more information on just what that client has in mind.
A. How is Access going to know who is using it?
Is it enough to check that the right machine on the network is using
it?
Or do you need some sort of UserID (with or without password)?
B. What do you mean by the table being available to only this user?
Only this user can add records?
Only this user can edit existing records?
Only this user can delete records?
Only this user can read records directly?
Only this user can use values from this table in calculations?
C. How worried is your client about other users trying to access this
table?
Do other users just need a slap on the wrist and a "don't go there"?
Do they have serious hackers trying to get to this highly
confidential information?

Sorry for all the questions, but this is the level of clarity you really
need before you can design a solution.
(BTW - I've sometimes experienced clients who come up with a "good idea"
like this, but withdraw it when they realize all the questions it
entails...)

HTH

<pe***********@aol.com> wrote in message
news:11**********************@f14g2000cwb.googlegr oups.com...
I have never had a need to use Access' built in security. Now a client
has requested that one particular table be available only to a specific
user. (It happens to be information that's really not all that
critical, it's one of those silly requests... so I don't really mind a
mickey-mouse kind of implementation)

I would appreciate some recommendations for how to implement this.
1. Can Access security accomodate this?
2. Should I simply put a password for opening the form and assume no
user is smart enough to open the table?

(Oh, you wanted me to actually remove the games from your laptop? I
thought you just wanted me to hide them, I didn't know you didn't want
your ten-year-old son to be able to find them...)

3. What are good choices for handling problems with the password?
Should I allow a system administrator to reset it, which means, in
effect, that he/she can open the form or table?

We are not up to fingerprint ID or anything like that, so it's strictly
passwords at this point. Secret question that has to be answered?
Even that's not guaranteed, I know I write all mine down, because, for
example, I would never remember if I wrote the actual city for city of
birth, or the nearby suburb that we lived in...

All suggestions much appreciated.

I'm staying with Access 97, BTW, until I hear some really convincing
reason to upgrade...

Nov 13 '05 #2

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