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Getting rid of Access 2000 LDB files

P: n/a
I have a nightly automated transfer from SQL Server to MS Access 2000.
Every so often the tranfers gets interrupted and the Access database is
not closed down correctly.

This results in a corrupted database and a corresponding, open .LDB
file neither of which I can get rid of. I have to then re-create the
structure of the Access database in a new folder and start all over
again. I have about 6 identical, corrupted Access folders that just
sit there for months.

Is there a way to get rid of the LDB file so that I can delete the
database(s)?

Thanks in advance!

Peter Tyler
Geneva - Switzerland

Nov 13 '05 #1
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5 Replies


P: n/a
On 4 Feb 2005 01:50:10 -0800, PL*****@gmail.com wrote:
I have a nightly automated transfer from SQL Server to MS Access 2000.
Every so often the tranfers gets interrupted and the Access database is
not closed down correctly.

This results in a corrupted database and a corresponding, open .LDB
file neither of which I can get rid of. I have to then re-create the
structure of the Access database in a new folder and start all over
again. I have about 6 identical, corrupted Access folders that just
sit there for months.

Is there a way to get rid of the LDB file so that I can delete the
database(s)?


You can delete the ldb file when no users are attached to it.
Rebooting should do it.

DJ
Nov 13 '05 #2

P: n/a
Thanks.
You can delete the ldb file when no users are attached to it.

Rebooting should do it. >>

That would mean rebooting the SQL Server machine which must still be
attached, somehow, to the MDB file. There are no other users attached
to it. I just thought there may be a short cut somewhere.

Peter

Nov 13 '05 #3

P: n/a
Peter Tyler wrote:
Thanks.

You can delete the ldb file when no users are attached to it.


Rebooting should do it. >>

That would mean rebooting the SQL Server machine which must still be
attached, somehow, to the MDB file. There are no other users attached
to it. I just thought there may be a short cut somewhere.


-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

When no users are in the Access .mdb file you can delete the .ldb file
(just highlight the file name in Windows Explorer & hit the Delete key &
click the Yes button on the warning dialog box). If that doesn't work,
sometimes rebooting the machine the .ldb file is on gets rid of it.

You might also try opening the "corrupted" .mdb file & compacting &
repairing it. After closing that file, usually the .ldb file will
disappear.

Good luck,
--
MGFoster:::mgf00 <at> earthlink <decimal-point> net
Oakland, CA (USA)

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Nov 13 '05 #4

P: n/a
>>You might also try opening the "corrupted" .mdb file & compacting &
repairing it. After closing that file, usually the .ldb file will
disappear.>>

Normally you can't compact and repair an MDB file if there are other
'users' attached to it which, in this case, appears to be an SQL Server
on the network.

But thanks anyway.

Peter

Nov 13 '05 #5

P: n/a
Peter Tyler wrote:
You might also try opening the "corrupted" .mdb file & compacting &


repairing it. After closing that file, usually the .ldb file will
disappear.>>

Normally you can't compact and repair an MDB file if there are other
'users' attached to it which, in this case, appears to be an SQL Server
on the network.


SQL Server has nothing to do w/ the .ldb file, it is purely related to
the Access file.

--
MGFoster:::mgf00 <at> earthlink <decimal-point> net
Oakland, CA (USA)
Nov 13 '05 #6

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