By using this site, you agree to our updated Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Manage your Cookies Settings.
454,105 Members | 1,048 Online
Bytes IT Community
+ Ask a Question
Need help? Post your question and get tips & solutions from a community of 454,105 IT Pros & Developers. It's quick & easy.

Visual Source Safe and MS Access

P: n/a
Can we use Visual Source Safe to keep MS Access files?
What are the pros and cons.
Any refernces and links on that topic.

Thanks, Eugene
Nov 13 '05 #1
Share this Question
Share on Google+
2 Replies


P: n/a

Eugene wrote:
Can we use Visual Source Safe to keep MS Access files?
What are the pros and cons.
Any refernces and links on that topic.

Thanks, Eugene


Yes you can, if you have Office Developer edition.

Pros:
* Absolutely necessary if you have multiple developers working on the
same Access application at one time.
* If you are the only developer, it may be too much effort. I don't
use SourceSafe, but instead rely on the Multi-code Import and Export
add-ins.

Cons:
* Clunky - you have to re-checkin all files after each application
build
* Cryptic - good documentation is hard to find.

References:
* Google Microsoft.com for:
sourcesafe office developer

-Ken

Nov 13 '05 #2

P: n/a
I wanted to add a note about doing single-developer source code control
without a tool. What I've been doing successfully is this.

I have a folder on the machine or on the network that is my source code
repository. Within that, there is a folder for each revision named using the
format <yyyy>-<mm>-<dd>-v<n>s where <n> is a number incremented for each
revision during a single day, e.g. 2005-01-20-v2s. "s", in this case, refers
to the fact that this is the archived copy in the source code control
repository and makes it harder to be confused about which directory you have
open in Windows Explorer (very important).

Now, the working copy, I keep on my desktop in the same format, but ending in
"d" (for desktop) instead of "s". Each time, I'm ready to check in, I
increment the revision number of the copy on the desktop, copy it to the
repository, then change the "d" to an "s".

It's a good idea to check in at least twice a day, and once before any change
that makes you nervous. You can be much less cautious and work much faster
knowing you can revert to a backup from 5 minutes ago if you mess it up.

To conserve space, you can thin the older data as it becomes more and more of
a historical relic. For the medium-aged data, delete mid-day versions, and
for the oldest data, delete whole days, but try to not delete large chunks of
sequential time.

On 28 Jan 2005 08:38:11 -0800, "Ken Ismert" <ki*****@texassystems.com> wrote:

Eugene wrote:
Can we use Visual Source Safe to keep MS Access files?
What are the pros and cons.
Any refernces and links on that topic.

Thanks, Eugene


Yes you can, if you have Office Developer edition.

Pros:
* Absolutely necessary if you have multiple developers working on the
same Access application at one time.
* If you are the only developer, it may be too much effort. I don't
use SourceSafe, but instead rely on the Multi-code Import and Export
add-ins.

Cons:
* Clunky - you have to re-checkin all files after each application
build
* Cryptic - good documentation is hard to find.

References:
* Google Microsoft.com for:
sourcesafe office developer

-Ken


Nov 13 '05 #3

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.