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Database Security

P: n/a
Ant


I am trying to apply security to a database I have just finished. The
application is split into a back end of tables and a front end of forms etc.
I need some users to have access to forms based on some queries but not
others. My question is do I run the security wizard in the back end DB or
the front end? If I just do the front end I seem to have more control
(Queries, individual forms etc) but whatís to stop some one just opening the
back end DB. If I run the security wizard on the back end I can block
access to tables but not queries or forms. If I ran it in both I feel both
me and Access would get confused

As you can probably guess itís the first time I have applied security levels
in a DB but I need to get it right first time. Thanks for any suggestions

Nov 13 '05 #1
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4 Replies


P: n/a
The point is you want to secure the application, so you must secure both
front and backends. Access won't get confused...

Some tips on Access security I put together for my Blog in May follow.
--

Tony D'Ambra
Web Site: aadconsulting.com
Web Blog: accessextra.net

Effective MS Access Security?

Did you know that:

1. You can access the Start-Up properties (such as disabling the Shift key
bypass) of an .mde through an .mdb and change each property

2. You can open an .mde with the Shift key, press Ctrl+G to open the Debug
window, press F2 to open the Object Browser, and then search all the code
modules and constants.

3. You can import all the form and report objects but not the code from an
unsecured .mde into an .mdb.

To effectively secure an Access database you MUST demote the Admin user from
the Admins group. Otherwise your database will not be secure, as Admin
cannot be removed from the Users group, and anyone using the retail
system.mdw file logs on automatically as Admin.

Securing An Access Database

1. Use the Access Workgroup Administrator (AWA), wrkgadm.exe, to create a
new workgroup (.mdw) file.

2. Join the new workgroup using the AWA.

3. Open Access and the database to be secured.

4. Using Tools, Security, User and Group Accounts..., in the User and Group
Accounts dialog:

4.1 Create a password for Admin user.

4.2 Create a new user account. This account will be the new database owner
account. For example, call the owner account DBOwner. Add "DBOwner" to all
groups, including the critical Admins group.

5. Close and re-open Access, logging on as "DbOwner", and leaving the
password blank, as you have not assigned one yet.

7. In the User and Group Accounts dialog, demote the Admin user account by
removing it from the Admins group. Now Admin is only a member of the Users
group and will have only those permissions assigned to that group by
"DBOwner".

8. Create a password for "DBOwner".

9. Close and re-open Access, logging on as "DBOwner" using the password you
created in step 8.

10. You can now start to secure the objects in you database.

Special Notes:

* A User account inherits the permissions of the Group to which it belongs.

* In Access 2000 and later, if you are not creating an .mde, you also need
to secure your code by using Password Protection in the VBA Editor.
"Ant" <an*******@virgin.net> wrote in message
news:C1*****************@newsfe1-win.ntli.net...


I am trying to apply security to a database I have just finished. The
application is split into a back end of tables and a front end of forms
etc.
I need some users to have access to forms based on some queries but not
others. My question is do I run the security wizard in the back end DB or
the front end? If I just do the front end I seem to have more control
(Queries, individual forms etc) but whatís to stop some one just opening
the
back end DB. If I run the security wizard on the back end I can block
access to tables but not queries or forms. If I ran it in both I feel
both
me and Access would get confused

As you can probably guess itís the first time I have applied security
levels
in a DB but I need to get it right first time. Thanks for any suggestions

Nov 13 '05 #2

P: n/a
I'm new to Access security and have a couple of questions if anyone can
help. From what I've read, after a database is secured, the Access
application itself has to be logged on to. Does this effect other
databases on the same machine?

How does security work in a shared network environment? Is the .mdw
file shared on the network?

Nov 13 '05 #3

P: n/a
On 5 Jan 2005 16:17:17 -0800, "Wayne" <cq*******@volcanomail.com>
wrote:
I'm new to Access security and have a couple of questions if anyone can
help. From what I've read, after a database is secured, the Access
application itself has to be logged on to. Does this effect other
databases on the same machine?
If you change the default workgroup for Access (which the wizard
*does*), then yes, other databases are affected. If, on the other
hand, you properly customize a shortcut to log onto a workgroup and
launch your database, then other databases are not affected.

How does security work in a shared network environment? Is the .mdw Very well...
file shared on the network?

Proper location is on a network share where all users have full
read-write permission.

See the website in my signature for several good explanations.

**********************
ja**************@telusTELUS.net
remove uppercase letters for true email
http://www.geocities.com/jacksonmacd/ for info on MS Access security
Nov 13 '05 #4

P: n/a
Thanks for the info Jack.

Nov 13 '05 #5

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