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Sequel Server

P: n/a
Ian
Can anyone give me advice on migrating my Access backend to sequel server? I
am sure there are discussion groups and documentation for this but don't
know where to look.

I am looking for answers to general questions such as:

Will my VBA still work?

What is the migration procedure?

How much faster will the database run? I find now on a single PC a report
with 30 text boxes a picture opens in about a second, the same report on a
network with 10 users takes about 20 seconds to open, same report on larger
busy network can take 10 minutes. Will Sequel help in this situation?

What does the user licence cost?

Is Sequel a good choice or should I consider others?

Any help would be appreciated.
Nov 13 '05 #1
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5 Replies


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Ian,
SQL Server is very great. Your VBA will work fine. It's possible that you
may find some problems with DAO/ODBC instead of the ADODB library but I
haven't coded anything for money in a couple years so my assumption that DAO
would be worse may be incorrect. The migration procedure is to use the
Upsizing Wizard in Access. It will be faster, but a lot depends on how you
write your SQL and how much you understand about optimizing SQL to take
advantage of SQL Server's way of doing things.

"Ian" <ia********@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
news:al****************@newsfe4-gui.ntli.net...
Can anyone give me advice on migrating my Access backend to sequel server?
I
am sure there are discussion groups and documentation for this but don't
know where to look.

I am looking for answers to general questions such as:

Will my VBA still work?

What is the migration procedure?

How much faster will the database run? I find now on a single PC a report
with 30 text boxes a picture opens in about a second, the same report on a
network with 10 users takes about 20 seconds to open, same report on
larger
busy network can take 10 minutes. Will Sequel help in this situation?

What does the user licence cost?

Is Sequel a good choice or should I consider others?

Any help would be appreciated.

Nov 13 '05 #2

P: n/a
Alan Webb wrote:
Ian,
SQL Server is very great. Your VBA will work fine. It's possible that you
may find some problems with DAO/ODBC instead of the ADODB library but I
haven't coded anything for money in a couple years so my assumption that DAO
would be worse may be incorrect. The migration procedure is to use the
Upsizing Wizard in Access. It will be faster, but a lot depends on how you
write your SQL and how much you understand about optimizing SQL to take
advantage of SQL Server's way of doing things.


What's "incorrect" about DAO on SQL Server? I've not found any problems.

--
This sig left intentionally blank
Nov 13 '05 #3

P: n/a
On Tue, 14 Dec 2004 08:30:31 +0000, Trevor Best <no****@besty.org.uk>
wrote:

What's "incorrect" about DAO on SQL Server? I've not found any problems.

--

Hi
Microsoft implied that anyone who still used it was a fuddy duddy,
which influenced the young and impressionable at that time.
David
Nov 13 '05 #4

P: n/a
d.***************@blueyonder.co.uk (David Schofield) wrote in
news:41beb0fb.403904473@localhost:
On Tue, 14 Dec 2004 08:30:31 +0000, Trevor Best
<no****@besty.org.uk> wrote:

What's "incorrect" about DAO on SQL Server? I've not found any
problems.


Microsoft implied that anyone who still used it was a fuddy duddy,
which influenced the young and impressionable at that time.


You mean like Lyle Fairfield?

--
David W. Fenton http://www.bway.net/~dfenton
dfenton at bway dot net http://www.bway.net/~dfassoc
Nov 13 '05 #5

P: n/a
Sql Server (2000 or 7 or 6.5) is an rdbms (relational database
management system). As such, the usage is primarily for data
processing, crunching numbers. The difference between Access and Sql
Server is something like this:

If you are going to work on a swiss watch, you use real fine jewel
instruments, Access remains unmatched in ultra refined data processing
for byte size pieces of data (50,000 recs and less). For big jobs like
Pile driving the foundation of a sky scraper building you use a 10 story
tall pile driver. For big data, more than a few gigs (Access limit is
one gig - theoretically) to terabytes, you have Microsoft Sql Server,
Oracle, Sybase, Mainframes. Can process large chunks of data in seconds
compared to Access, but it is much more difficult to get a very refined
data result from a large chunk of data using Sql Server. So the idea is
to crunch big data down to byte size with Sql Server and then feed that
to Access for more refined processing.

Pictures are just viewing files. All you need for pictures is a file
Server. To view a pic file on the web you use Internet Information
server to feed the pic file from the file server to a calling browser.
You can think of sql server (and IIS) more as services than a database,
database system.

For an enterprise system, (2-3 tier business application) over the web,
this would require a lot of horse power to handle multiple users and
multiple simultaneous data processing. Some people argue than Access
can handle several people simultaneously over the web. This has not
been my experience. For more than 10 people at one time, I recommend
sql Server.

As for using vba with sql server, you can manipulate com based ADO with
vba with is one of the primary platforms for exchanging data between Sql
Server and Access or other MS Products, or Oracle, even Lotus Notes.
These all support ADO. Although, the more ideal platform for Sql Server
(and Oracle) is ADO.Net.

AS for licensing, I believe this is based on how many processors you
have on your server computer. I think you get something like 25 seats
per processor. I just write code at my place so I don't get into this
end much. All I know, is that the more processors you have on the
machine, the more the Licenses will cost.

And lastly, migration difficulty - if you want to do this yourself - the
difficulty will be based on your programming proficiency. If you
subcontract programmers, the migration difficulty will be based on
project management proficiency.

Rich

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Nov 13 '05 #6

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