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Link tables and file locks

P: n/a
Is there any way to link a table to a front end for reference only (no
requirement to edit data) so that the LDB file is not created.
I use a number of tables for reference and do not need to edit them. I
read some of the table values. The form that is displayed does not use
any of the data in the reference tables.
Alex
Nov 13 '05 #1
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4 Replies


P: n/a
Well I don't think so, as soon as you open a database that has links
in it to a backend, you see the ldb file appear.
However you can access a table in an mdb without linking it, eg:

select * from c:\Prod\Prod\MyDb.mdb.MyTableName

will select all the rows for the specified table.

I guess using this you could create a recordset to get at the data you
want - maybe store the values in a string value that you could then
use as the rowsource of a list box or something other control on the
form - can't tell how you want to use the data.

Be warned however that for the period you have the query of recordset
open, Access will create an ldb file if one doesn't already exist.
When you close the query/recordset it'll clear the entry in the ldb
and if you're the only one that was accessing the database it'll get
rid of the ldb.
My understanding (and there are people in this group who know a lot
more about this than me) is that the ldb keeps track of who is
accessing which byte ranges on the mdb file and with what type of
lock. So it doesn't matter how you access the backend, though a
linked table or a "direct" query as above, or some other way, if
you're using Jet, it'll go ldb.

However I'm a little intrigued by your question - your concern about
an ldb file per se.
al********@hotmail.com (Alex) wrote in message news:<49**************************@posting.google. com>...
Is there any way to link a table to a front end for reference only (no
requirement to edit data) so that the LDB file is not created.
I use a number of tables for reference and do not need to edit them. I
read some of the table values. The form that is displayed does not use
any of the data in the reference tables.
Alex

Nov 13 '05 #2

P: n/a
You can use WorkGroup Security, and link the table with Read Only
permission. That will still create an LDB file. Why do you care
about the LDB file? If the file is (almost) never written to,
you can put it in a read-only folder.

(david)

"Alex" <al********@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:49**************************@posting.google.c om...
Is there any way to link a table to a front end for reference only (no
requirement to edit data) so that the LDB file is not created.
I use a number of tables for reference and do not need to edit them. I
read some of the table values. The form that is displayed does not use
any of the data in the reference tables.
Alex

Nov 13 '05 #3

P: n/a
I use a series of backend mdb files each with a number of tables.
These are linked to a number of front ends in a multi user
environment. I notice that some
front ends take a long time to open when another user has a front end
open. e.g. yser1 opens front end 1 and user2 takes a long time to open
front end 2. The common factor seems to be if there is an ldb file.
If I display a table in a form, even for read only purposes, based on
a read only query, an ldb file is still created which then means that
other users have a speed issue opening the front end. Once open
everything functions well.

Alex

dr**********@hotmail.com (Terry Bell) wrote in message news:<92**************************@posting.google. com>...
Well I don't think so, as soon as you open a database that has links
in it to a backend, you see the ldb file appear.
However you can access a table in an mdb without linking it, eg:

select * from c:\Prod\Prod\MyDb.mdb.MyTableName

will select all the rows for the specified table.

I guess using this you could create a recordset to get at the data you
want - maybe store the values in a string value that you could then
use as the rowsource of a list box or something other control on the
form - can't tell how you want to use the data.

Be warned however that for the period you have the query of recordset
open, Access will create an ldb file if one doesn't already exist.
When you close the query/recordset it'll clear the entry in the ldb
and if you're the only one that was accessing the database it'll get
rid of the ldb.
My understanding (and there are people in this group who know a lot
more about this than me) is that the ldb keeps track of who is
accessing which byte ranges on the mdb file and with what type of
lock. So it doesn't matter how you access the backend, though a
linked table or a "direct" query as above, or some other way, if
you're using Jet, it'll go ldb.

However I'm a little intrigued by your question - your concern about
an ldb file per se.
al********@hotmail.com (Alex) wrote in message news:<49**************************@posting.google. com>...
Is there any way to link a table to a front end for reference only (no
requirement to edit data) so that the LDB file is not created.
I use a number of tables for reference and do not need to edit them. I
read some of the table values. The form that is displayed does not use
any of the data in the reference tables.
Alex

Nov 13 '05 #4

P: n/a
Turn off Oportunistic Locking on the file server. The LDB file
is actually cached at the PC of the first user, and when the
second user starts, the LDB has to be copied from the first PC
back to the server.

Or just put the read-only databases in a read-only folder.

Here is some information on disabling Caching and OPLOCKS:

Configuring Opportunistic Locking in Windows
http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=296264

Opportunistic Locking and Read Caching on Microsoft Windows Networks
http://www.dataaccess.com/whitepaper...adcaching.html

(david)

"Alex" <al********@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:49**************************@posting.google.c om...
I use a series of backend mdb files each with a number of tables.
These are linked to a number of front ends in a multi user
environment. I notice that some
front ends take a long time to open when another user has a front end
open. e.g. yser1 opens front end 1 and user2 takes a long time to open
front end 2. The common factor seems to be if there is an ldb file.
If I display a table in a form, even for read only purposes, based on
a read only query, an ldb file is still created which then means that
other users have a speed issue opening the front end. Once open
everything functions well.

Alex

dr**********@hotmail.com (Terry Bell) wrote in message

news:<92**************************@posting.google. com>...
Well I don't think so, as soon as you open a database that has links
in it to a backend, you see the ldb file appear.
However you can access a table in an mdb without linking it, eg:

select * from c:\Prod\Prod\MyDb.mdb.MyTableName

will select all the rows for the specified table.

I guess using this you could create a recordset to get at the data you
want - maybe store the values in a string value that you could then
use as the rowsource of a list box or something other control on the
form - can't tell how you want to use the data.

Be warned however that for the period you have the query of recordset
open, Access will create an ldb file if one doesn't already exist.
When you close the query/recordset it'll clear the entry in the ldb
and if you're the only one that was accessing the database it'll get
rid of the ldb.
My understanding (and there are people in this group who know a lot
more about this than me) is that the ldb keeps track of who is
accessing which byte ranges on the mdb file and with what type of
lock. So it doesn't matter how you access the backend, though a
linked table or a "direct" query as above, or some other way, if
you're using Jet, it'll go ldb.

However I'm a little intrigued by your question - your concern about
an ldb file per se.
al********@hotmail.com (Alex) wrote in message news:<49**************************@posting.google. com>...
Is there any way to link a table to a front end for reference only (no
requirement to edit data) so that the LDB file is not created.
I use a number of tables for reference and do not need to edit them. I
read some of the table values. The form that is displayed does not use
any of the data in the reference tables.
Alex

Nov 13 '05 #5

This discussion thread is closed

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