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Limit of users in Ms-Access?

P: n/a
Hi.

In the ldb file you can see the users of the mdb-file. If you open the
mdb-file your machine and username will be written in the lbd- file.
Allthough you close the mdb-file your name won't disappear from the
ldb-file, before every user has closed the mdb-file.
I have heard that there will be problems if the amount of users will
be over 10 in mdb-files. Is that true?

Hannu
Nov 13 '05 #1
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6 Replies


P: n/a
ha***************@niiralankulma.fi (Hannu) wrote:
I have heard that there will be problems if the amount of users will
be over 10 in mdb-files. Is that true?


I presume you mean in the ldb file. I'm not aware of any problems provided
that the app is split and each user has their own front end.

Regards,
Keith.
Nov 13 '05 #2

P: n/a
Hi, Hannu.

The maximum number of concurrent users for Microsoft Access is 255. The
only limit I've heard of so far about "no more than ten users" is not an
Access limit, but a Windows XP networking limit. If a multiuser Access
database application is placed on a Windows XP peer-to-peer network, then no
more than 10 users will be able to open the file at the same time. Of
course that limit applies to any file on that network, not just the Access
database. The solution to this, of course, is to use a client/server
network with a dedicated server.

If a multiuser database is designed correctly with a split front end and
back end, all users are given Windows "Full control" security permissions on
the network shared directory, and all users are only reading the records,
instead of inserting, updating and deleting records, then the limit of 255
concurrent users _could_ be reached. However, real life doesn't give us
such an ideal scenario.

The number of concurrent users will be limited to the amount of network
traffic and the amount of record lock contention. The record lock
contention can be controlled to some degree by the efficiency of the
database design and database application design. This is where experienced
Access database developers are worth their weight in gold, because they can
often create a fairly robust database system with Access, instead of
creating a much more expensive database system with SQL Server, Oracle, or
another RDBMS.

So, the limit on users depends upon the needs of the database application,
the amount of record lock contention, the network and how it handles
traffic, and the expertise of the database developer. This limit could be
from one user to 30 or more concurrent users in a reliable Access database
system, depending upon all of these factors.
In the ldb file you can see the users of the mdb-file. If you open the
mdb-file your machine and username will be written in the lbd- file.
Allthough you close the mdb-file your name won't disappear from the
ldb-file, before every user has closed the mdb-file.
Since the *.LDB file is not a list of "active" users, don't worry about
non-current usernames and computer names being listed in the *.LDB file.
These entries are never deleted. When another user opens a currently open
database after other users have exited, the new user's username and computer
name will overwrite one of the old entries.

HTH.

Gunny

See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips.

(Please remove ZERO_SPAM from my reply E-mail address, so that a message
will be forwarded to me.)
"Hannu" <ha***************@niiralankulma.fi> wrote in message
news:e6**************************@posting.google.c om... Hi.

In the ldb file you can see the users of the mdb-file. If you open the
mdb-file your machine and username will be written in the lbd- file.
Allthough you close the mdb-file your name won't disappear from the
ldb-file, before every user has closed the mdb-file.
I have heard that there will be problems if the amount of users will
be over 10 in mdb-files. Is that true?

Hannu

Nov 13 '05 #3

P: n/a
On Mon, 06 Sep 2004 15:18:58 GMT, "'69 Camaro"
<Fo**************************@Spameater.orgZERO_SP AM> wrote:

This limitation does not exist for the Server versions of operating
systems. You can have a Windows 2000 Server machine hosting the
back-end file, and theoretically have 255 users open it concurrently.

-Tom.

Hi, Hannu.

The maximum number of concurrent users for Microsoft Access is 255. The
only limit I've heard of so far about "no more than ten users" is not an
Access limit, but a Windows XP networking limit. If a multiuser Access
database application is placed on a Windows XP peer-to-peer network, then no
more than 10 users will be able to open the file at the same time. Of
course that limit applies to any file on that network, not just the Access
database. The solution to this, of course, is to use a client/server
network with a dedicated server.

<clip>

Nov 13 '05 #4

P: n/a
Hi, Tom.

That's what I wrote, but you wrote the same thing more succinctly! Perhaps
I should have just written, "Avoid the peer-to-peer network limitation by
using a client/server network with a dedicated server," without the rest of
my verbose explanation.

Gunny
"Tom van Stiphout" <no*************@cox.net> wrote in message
news:eq********************************@4ax.com...
On Mon, 06 Sep 2004 15:18:58 GMT, "'69 Camaro"
<Fo**************************@Spameater.orgZERO_SP AM> wrote:

This limitation does not exist for the Server versions of operating
systems. You can have a Windows 2000 Server machine hosting the
back-end file, and theoretically have 255 users open it concurrently.

-Tom.

Hi, Hannu.

The maximum number of concurrent users for Microsoft Access is 255. The
only limit I've heard of so far about "no more than ten users" is not an
Access limit, but a Windows XP networking limit. If a multiuser Access
database application is placed on a Windows XP peer-to-peer network, then nomore than 10 users will be able to open the file at the same time. Of
course that limit applies to any file on that network, not just the Accessdatabase. The solution to this, of course, is to use a client/server
network with a dedicated server.

<clip>

Nov 13 '05 #5

P: n/a
Tom van Stiphout wrote:
On Mon, 06 Sep 2004 15:18:58 GMT, "'69 Camaro"
<Fo**************************@Spameater.orgZERO_SP AM> wrote:

This limitation does not exist for the Server versions of operating
systems. You can have a Windows 2000 Server machine hosting the
back-end file, and theoretically have 255 users open it concurrently.


That takes care of physical limits but then practical limits will set
in, depending on the design of the application and what's done with it,
you might find performance and/or locking problems at 10 users, or it
may be OK at 50 users, etc. It's one of those "suck it and see" scenarios.

--

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\ \ Please Wait.
\__\

Nov 13 '05 #6

P: n/a
The number of users is restricted to 10 if you are running windows
2000 and the database is residing on a local machine on a shared
folder. Microsoft has set the limit to 10 to encourage small
businesses who don't have servers, to buy Small Business Server (or
some product with a similar name).

I have had to battle with this limitation recently and it can be a big
problem. This was resolved in the end by the users to share usage of
the database by closing it when they weren't physically performing any
actions with it.

:)
Nov 13 '05 #7

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