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"Molasses" for Windows LAN?

P: n/a
Back when I was writing Mac/Pascal stuff, there was a little utility called
"Molasses" that could be set to slow down the whole system by variying amounts.

The idea was that if you're developing on a really fast box, you want to get an
idea of how the app will run on a slower machine.

I find myself in a somewhat-similar situation now. My little home LAN is
really fast (should be...there's nothing much going over it...) but the
client's LAN is *really* slow. I find myself developing screens that run just
fine in my development environment, but are (to me, at least) unacceptably slow
over the clien's LAN.

So, is there something I can do to slow down my development LAN environment to
approximate a client's. I guess some sort of repeatable benchmark is the
first step....but after that, how to slow the whole thing down?
--
PeteCresswell
Nov 13 '05 #1
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13 Replies


P: n/a

"(Pete Cresswell)" <x@y.z> wrote in message
news:6e********************************@4ax.com...
Back when I was writing Mac/Pascal stuff, there was a little utility called "Molasses" that could be set to slow down the whole system by variying amounts.
The idea was that if you're developing on a really fast box, you want to get an idea of how the app will run on a slower machine.

I find myself in a somewhat-similar situation now. My little home LAN is
really fast (should be...there's nothing much going over it...) but the
client's LAN is *really* slow. I find myself developing screens that run just fine in my development environment, but are (to me, at least) unacceptably slow over the clien's LAN.

So, is there something I can do to slow down my development LAN environment to approximate a client's. I guess some sort of repeatable benchmark is the first step....but after that, how to slow the whole thing down?
--
PeteCresswell

Sounds like "Baloney" for Windows. How could slowing down your system
possible affect your database design?

Hans
Nov 13 '05 #2

P: n/a
Typically, your screens should be in the front end of a split application,
and should be located on the local PC. Thus, their loading should not be
dependent on the network - except if you're bringing a large amount of data
across the network to display.
Most folks don't really need to interact with very much data at a time;
you should keep this in mind as you design your application.

HTH
- Turtle

"(Pete Cresswell)" <x@y.z> wrote in message
news:6e********************************@4ax.com...
Back when I was writing Mac/Pascal stuff, there was a little utility called "Molasses" that could be set to slow down the whole system by variying amounts.
The idea was that if you're developing on a really fast box, you want to get an idea of how the app will run on a slower machine.

I find myself in a somewhat-similar situation now. My little home LAN is
really fast (should be...there's nothing much going over it...) but the
client's LAN is *really* slow. I find myself developing screens that run just fine in my development environment, but are (to me, at least) unacceptably slow over the clien's LAN.

So, is there something I can do to slow down my development LAN environment to approximate a client's. I guess some sort of repeatable benchmark is the first step....but after that, how to slow the whole thing down?
--
PeteCresswell

Nov 13 '05 #3

P: n/a
There's a product called "Mo'Slo" that may do what you want:

http://www.hpaa.com/moslo/

Have never tried it, just heard of it.

Anne

"MacDermott" <ma********@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:fu****************@newsread2.news.atl.earthli nk.net...
Typically, your screens should be in the front end of a split application,
and should be located on the local PC. Thus, their loading should not be
dependent on the network - except if you're bringing a large amount of data across the network to display.
Most folks don't really need to interact with very much data at a time; you should keep this in mind as you design your application.

HTH
- Turtle

"(Pete Cresswell)" <x@y.z> wrote in message
news:6e********************************@4ax.com...
Back when I was writing Mac/Pascal stuff, there was a little utility called
"Molasses" that could be set to slow down the whole system by variying

amounts.

The idea was that if you're developing on a really fast box, you want to

get an
idea of how the app will run on a slower machine.

I find myself in a somewhat-similar situation now. My little home LAN is really fast (should be...there's nothing much going over it...) but the
client's LAN is *really* slow. I find myself developing screens that

run just
fine in my development environment, but are (to me, at least)
unacceptably slow
over the clien's LAN.

So, is there something I can do to slow down my development LAN

environment to
approximate a client's. I guess some sort of repeatable benchmark is

the
first step....but after that, how to slow the whole thing down?
--
PeteCresswell


Nov 13 '05 #4

P: n/a
You can normally set your lan speed to 10 instead of 100
it's not much, but it sometimes helps

(david)
"Hans Giebenrath" <no****@invalid.com> wrote in message
news:Mo********************@vnet-inc.com...

"(Pete Cresswell)" <x@y.z> wrote in message
news:6e********************************@4ax.com...
Back when I was writing Mac/Pascal stuff, there was a little utility called
"Molasses" that could be set to slow down the whole system by variying

amounts.

The idea was that if you're developing on a really fast box, you want to

get an
idea of how the app will run on a slower machine.

I find myself in a somewhat-similar situation now. My little home LAN is really fast (should be...there's nothing much going over it...) but the
client's LAN is *really* slow. I find myself developing screens that

run just
fine in my development environment, but are (to me, at least)
unacceptably slow
over the clien's LAN.

So, is there something I can do to slow down my development LAN

environment to
approximate a client's. I guess some sort of repeatable benchmark is

the
first step....but after that, how to slow the whole thing down?
--
PeteCresswell

Sounds like "Baloney" for Windows. How could slowing down your system
possible affect your database design?

Hans

Nov 13 '05 #5

P: n/a
Can you find an old, slow, memory-challenged Windows machine to use
for your network server instead of running from a local backend
database? Load it up with some continually-running software to slow
down its network response.

On Wed, 25 Aug 2004 23:21:12 GMT, "(Pete Cresswell)" <x@y.z> wrote:
Back when I was writing Mac/Pascal stuff, there was a little utility called
"Molasses" that could be set to slow down the whole system by variying amounts.

The idea was that if you're developing on a really fast box, you want to get an
idea of how the app will run on a slower machine.

I find myself in a somewhat-similar situation now. My little home LAN is
really fast (should be...there's nothing much going over it...) but the
client's LAN is *really* slow. I find myself developing screens that run just
fine in my development environment, but are (to me, at least) unacceptably slow
over the clien's LAN.

So, is there something I can do to slow down my development LAN environment to
approximate a client's. I guess some sort of repeatable benchmark is the
first step....but after that, how to slow the whole thing down?

**********************
ja**************@telusTELUS.net
remove uppercase letters for true email
http://www.geocities.com/jacksonmacd/ for info on MS Access security
Nov 13 '05 #6

P: n/a
On Wed, 25 Aug 2004 23:21:12 GMT, "(Pete Cresswell)" <x@y.z> wrote:
Back when I was writing Mac/Pascal stuff, there was a little utility called
"Molasses" that could be set to slow down the whole system by variying amounts.

The idea was that if you're developing on a really fast box, you want to get an
idea of how the app will run on a slower machine.

I find myself in a somewhat-similar situation now. My little home LAN is
really fast (should be...there's nothing much going over it...) but the
client's LAN is *really* slow. I find myself developing screens that run just
fine in my development environment, but are (to me, at least) unacceptably slow
over the clien's LAN.

So, is there something I can do to slow down my development LAN environment to
approximate a client's. I guess some sort of repeatable benchmark is the
first step....but after that, how to slow the whole thing down?


I've got an old P133 with 96MB RAM and a 10MB network card running NT4
that makes a great file server :-) Maybe you should make a trip to a
swap meet and look for an old 386 with Win 3.11.

--
Regards.
Richard.
Nov 13 '05 #7

P: n/a
Anne Nolan wrote:
There's a product called "Mo'Slo" that may do what you want:

http://www.hpaa.com/moslo/

Have never tried it, just heard of it.


Microsoft bring out new versions of Windows to do that :-)

That may work to simulate running on a slow machine but I think Pete
wants to be able to vary the bandwidth across his network.

--

\\\\\\
\\ \\ Windows is searching
\ \ For your sig.
\ \ Please Wait.
\__\

Nov 13 '05 #8

P: n/a
(Pete Cresswell) wrote:
Back when I was writing Mac/Pascal stuff, there was a little utility called
"Molasses" that could be set to slow down the whole system by variying amounts.

The idea was that if you're developing on a really fast box, you want to get an
idea of how the app will run on a slower machine.

I find myself in a somewhat-similar situation now. My little home LAN is
really fast (should be...there's nothing much going over it...) but the
client's LAN is *really* slow. I find myself developing screens that run just
fine in my development environment, but are (to me, at least) unacceptably slow
over the clien's LAN.

So, is there something I can do to slow down my development LAN environment to
approximate a client's. I guess some sort of repeatable benchmark is the
first step....but after that, how to slow the whole thing down?

Would running it across the internet on a VPN help? or would that be too
slow?

--

\\\\\\
\\ \\ Windows is searching
\ \ For your sig.
\ \ Please Wait.
\__\

Nov 13 '05 #9

P: n/a
> How could slowing down your system
possible affect your database design?


By allowing the developer to more quickly identify
areas that need optimization.
Nov 13 '05 #10

P: n/a

"PeteCresswell" <Go**********@FatBelly.com> wrote in message
news:74*************************@posting.google.co m...
How could slowing down your system
possible affect your database design?


By allowing the developer to more quickly identify
areas that need optimization.


I get it. A bad design to begin with. I mean, a "less-than-optimal design"
to begin with.

Hans
Nov 13 '05 #11

P: n/a
"(Pete Cresswell)" <x@y.z> wrote in
news:6e********************************@4ax.com:
Back when I was writing Mac/Pascal stuff, there was a little
utility called "Molasses" that could be set to slow down the whole
system by variying amounts.

The idea was that if you're developing on a really fast box, you
want to get an idea of how the app will run on a slower machine.

I find myself in a somewhat-similar situation now. My little
home LAN is really fast (should be...there's nothing much going
over it...) but the client's LAN is *really* slow. I find
myself developing screens that run just fine in my development
environment, but are (to me, at least) unacceptably slow over the
clien's LAN.

So, is there something I can do to slow down my development LAN
environment to approximate a client's. I guess some sort of
repeatable benchmark is the first step....but after that, how to
slow the whole thing down?


Have you considered simply swapping out your 100BaseT NIC for
10BaseT?

--
David W. Fenton http://www.bway.net/~dfenton
dfenton at bway dot net http://www.bway.net/~dfassoc
Nov 13 '05 #12

P: n/a
Most 100 baseT cards can still be set to 10.
If you are going to do card swapping, you should
look for a pair of coax cards that can be set
to 2.

(david)

"David W. Fenton" <dX********@bway.net.invalid> wrote in message
news:Xn**********************************@24.168.1 28.74...
"(Pete Cresswell)" <x@y.z> wrote in
news:6e********************************@4ax.com:
Back when I was writing Mac/Pascal stuff, there was a little
utility called "Molasses" that could be set to slow down the whole
system by variying amounts.

The idea was that if you're developing on a really fast box, you
want to get an idea of how the app will run on a slower machine.

I find myself in a somewhat-similar situation now. My little
home LAN is really fast (should be...there's nothing much going
over it...) but the client's LAN is *really* slow. I find
myself developing screens that run just fine in my development
environment, but are (to me, at least) unacceptably slow over the
clien's LAN.

So, is there something I can do to slow down my development LAN
environment to approximate a client's. I guess some sort of
repeatable benchmark is the first step....but after that, how to
slow the whole thing down?


Have you considered simply swapping out your 100BaseT NIC for
10BaseT?

--
David W. Fenton http://www.bway.net/~dfenton
dfenton at bway dot net http://www.bway.net/~dfassoc

Nov 13 '05 #13

P: n/a
Ere ya go http://www.netlimiter.com/

--

\\\\\\
\\ \\ Windows is searching
\ \ For your sig.
\ \ Please Wait.
\__\

Nov 13 '05 #14

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