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Problem using Access linked table in Visual Studio.Net

P: n/a
Using Access 2000, I have a linked table using specification named
"Test Link Specification"

When attempting to create data adapter in VS.Net, it first complains
that it cannot retrieve the schema for the table, or when trying to
preview data, it says that "The text file specification 'Test Link
Specification' does not exist.

??

These tables work if imported and not linked. I like just linking as
the text file changes daily. Or, is there a way to automatically
import the file at a selected time every day?

Thanks,

Larry
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
"Forget it, Jake. It's Chinatown."
Nov 13 '05 #1
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4 Replies


P: n/a
Larry Rekow <larry@netgeexdotcom> wrote in message news:<to********************************@4ax.com>. ..
Using Access 2000, I have a linked table using specification named
"Test Link Specification"

When attempting to create data adapter in VS.Net, it first complains
that it cannot retrieve the schema for the table, or when trying to
preview data, it says that "The text file specification 'Test Link
Specification' does not exist.

??

These tables work if imported and not linked. I like just linking as
the text file changes daily. Or, is there a way to automatically
import the file at a selected time every day?


If this were VB6 or Access, I would create a form with a timer on it
that checked the time every so often and then if the time were
(whatever), run the import. Check www.mvps.org/access for Scheduler
stuff... How to do it in .NET, not a clue.
Nov 13 '05 #2

P: n/a
That kind of specification is stored in the database, and
is not accessible to VS.NET. You need a schema.ini file
in the same folder as the text file. If you move the text
file, you need to move/copy the schema.ini file as well.

(david)

"Larry Rekow" <larry@netgeexdotcom> wrote in message
news:to********************************@4ax.com...
Using Access 2000, I have a linked table using specification named
"Test Link Specification"

When attempting to create data adapter in VS.Net, it first complains
that it cannot retrieve the schema for the table, or when trying to
preview data, it says that "The text file specification 'Test Link
Specification' does not exist.

??

These tables work if imported and not linked. I like just linking as
the text file changes daily. Or, is there a way to automatically
import the file at a selected time every day?

Thanks,

Larry
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
"Forget it, Jake. It's Chinatown."

Nov 13 '05 #3

P: n/a
On 24 Aug 2004 16:55:41 -0700, pi********@hotmail.com (Pieter Linden)
wrote:
If this were VB6 or Access, I would create a form with a timer on it
that checked the time every so often and then if the time were
(whatever), run the import. Check www.mvps.org/access for Scheduler
stuff... How to do it in .NET, not a clue.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++
thanks to you and david for responses. I believe I've finally solved
the problem in a way similar to your suggestion.

I wrote a macro in the Access db to do 3 things:
1) delete the table
2) import the table again from the specified text file using the
required specification, and
3) quit access

then i created a batch file which opens access and opens the db with
the /x switch and the name of the macro

this will open the db, run the macro, and quit, as per the macro

then i put this batch file in the task scheduler to run shortly after
the daily text report is run.

I had never before realized the full potential of the macros in
Access; now thinking about using it to import to a temporary table and
then munge the data as needed with a query to create an even better
table...one I can use without having to use a query or view on top of
it.

Thanks again,

Larry Rekow
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
"Forget it, Jake. It's Chinatown."
Nov 13 '05 #4

P: n/a
> thanks to you and david for responses. I believe I've finally solved
the problem in a way similar to your suggestion.

I wrote a macro in the Access db to do 3 things:
1) delete the table
2) import the table again from the specified text file using the
required specification, and
3) quit access


if your imports are always going to have the same structure, why not
just leave the table intact and just delete the contents when you're
done and compact the DB on close? Better yet, import to a temporary
DB, call the macro to process the data and then import to the final
one.
Nov 13 '05 #5

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