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VBA or VB.NET?

P: n/a
I've been teaching myself VBA but I'm wondering if it's more worthwhile to
be learning VB.NET instead? I'm learning the VBA to help me with
programming my Access database but I've read some articles recently which
basically imply that VBA is on its way out. Is it worth my time to learn
VBA or should I jump to VB.NET?

Thanks for any advice.
Nov 13 '05 #1
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8 Replies


P: n/a
Jump.

--
<%= Clinton Gallagher, "Twice the Results -- Half the Cost"
Architectural & e-Business Consulting -- Software Development
NET cs*********@REMOVETHISTEXTmetromilwaukee.com
URL http://www.metromilwaukee.com/clintongallagher/
"Big Time" <bi************@remove-for-spam-hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:cf**********@lettuce.bcit.ca...
I've been teaching myself VBA but I'm wondering if it's more worthwhile to
be learning VB.NET instead? I'm learning the VBA to help me with
programming my Access database but I've read some articles recently which
basically imply that VBA is on its way out. Is it worth my time to learn
VBA or should I jump to VB.NET?

Thanks for any advice.

Nov 13 '05 #2

P: n/a

After reading your Web site and studying your work experience it's obvious
to me that you know nothing about database theory or design and are in no
way qualified to answer the question at hand.
"clintonG" <cs*********@REMOVETHISTEXTmetromilwaukee.com> wrote in message
news:kS*******************@twister.rdc-kc.rr.com...
Jump.

--
<%= Clinton Gallagher, "Twice the Results -- Half the Cost"
Architectural & e-Business Consulting -- Software Development
NET cs*********@REMOVETHISTEXTmetromilwaukee.com
URL http://www.metromilwaukee.com/clintongallagher/
"Big Time" <bi************@remove-for-spam-hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:cf**********@lettuce.bcit.ca...
I've been teaching myself VBA but I'm wondering if it's more worthwhile to be learning VB.NET instead? I'm learning the VBA to help me with
programming my Access database but I've read some articles recently which basically imply that VBA is on its way out. Is it worth my time to learn VBA or should I jump to VB.NET?

Thanks for any advice.


Nov 13 '05 #3

P: n/a
There is presently no Access.NET. If you want to program an Access
database, you can only use VBA.

However, most people would agree that VBA is probably on the way out.

(david)
http://www.hyphenologist.co.uk/killf...filefaqhtm.htm

"Big Time" <bi************@remove-for-spam-hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:cf**********@lettuce.bcit.ca...
I've been teaching myself VBA but I'm wondering if it's more worthwhile to
be learning VB.NET instead? I'm learning the VBA to help me with
programming my Access database but I've read some articles recently which
basically imply that VBA is on its way out. Is it worth my time to learn
VBA or should I jump to VB.NET?

Thanks for any advice.

Nov 13 '05 #4

P: n/a
RE/
However, most people would agree that VBA is probably on the way out.


Any thoughts on what would replace MS Access for really-RAD development?

Once my current client issues my walking papers, one of my goals is to try to
develop a RAD.Net template and re-code a couple of my smaller apps using it to
see how many manhours are needed.

My guess is that two or three times more manhours would be acceptable to most
large clients....but not to the really-small guys. This is the factor that I
believe exists in MS Access-vs-VB6...although I've heard people say it's as much
as five...

Currently I'm on the periphery of a project that consists of rewriting a MS
Access bond trading app that I delivered for less than 225k over a period of
five years. So far, they've spent over 22 mil on it (about 50 people working
for over 3 years....) and delivery is still in the future (albiet hopefully the
near future). Yes, it certainly has more functionality than the one I
wrote....but 40x? I don't think so.... My hope is that a lot of the extra hours
are from the inevitable slippage that occurs when many people are involved...
--
PeteCresswell
Nov 13 '05 #5

P: n/a
RE/
3-6 times (hu)man-hours longer for development is the usual figure
given for a conversion to .Net, and from experience I can say that's
about right. Quite often the "conversion" is in reality a complete
re-write.


Is that from MS Access or VB6?
--
PeteCresswell
Nov 13 '05 #6

P: n/a

"Chuck Grimsby" <c.*******@worldnet.att.net.invalid> wrote in message
news:vp********************************@4ax.com...

3-6 times (hu)man-hours longer for development is the usual figure
given for a conversion to .Net, and from experience I can say that's
about right. Quite often the "conversion" is in reality a complete
re-write.

[Note to Readers: 6 huMAN hours = 3 perSON hours = 1.5 MAN hours.]
Nov 13 '05 #7

P: n/a
RE/
Either from Access or from scratch (which often seems to be the case
more often then not).


I've never done it, but I can't imagine anything else but from scratch.

Even when I get called in to "just put the finishing touches on..." some guy's
app that management says is "98% done" it always seems to turn out that the
thing was more like two percent done and that two percent is such a mess that I
can guess why the guy left...

"Rewrite from scratch" seems to be the most common situation for me...
--
PeteCresswell
Nov 13 '05 #8

P: n/a
RE/
Either from Access or...


Is there any area that seems to take a disproportionate amount of time compared
to MS Access? (not counting the stored procedures...)

Reports maybe?

--
PeteCresswell
Nov 13 '05 #9

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