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Can't open database in A2k

P: n/a
My client has a database that was written in Access97. The database
is password protected.

If I try to open the database by double-clicking on it, it asks for
the password. In Access97, I can enter the password and open the
database.

Similarly in Access 2003.

But not in Access 2000 - I get a "Not a valid password" error.

I have tried this on at least ten machines, with a variety of o/s and
flavours of Access. It always succeeds with A97 and A2k3, but always
fails with A2k.

Is there anything that I can do?

Edward
--
The reading group's reading group:
http://www.bookgroup.org.uk
Nov 13 '05 #1
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4 Replies


P: n/a
What is the password?

The best thing to do is change it in Access 97 or 2003 to something a bit
more A2000-friendly.
--
MichKa [MS]
NLS Collation/Locale/Keyboard Development
Globalization Infrastructure and Font Technologies
Windows International Division

This posting is provided "AS IS" with
no warranties, and confers no rights.

"Edward" <te********@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:25**************************@posting.google.c om...
My client has a database that was written in Access97. The database
is password protected.

If I try to open the database by double-clicking on it, it asks for
the password. In Access97, I can enter the password and open the
database.

Similarly in Access 2003.

But not in Access 2000 - I get a "Not a valid password" error.

I have tried this on at least ten machines, with a variety of o/s and
flavours of Access. It always succeeds with A97 and A2k3, but always
fails with A2k.

Is there anything that I can do?

Edward
--
The reading group's reading group:
http://www.bookgroup.org.uk

Nov 13 '05 #2

P: n/a
"Michael \(michka\) Kaplan [MS]" <mi*****@online.microsoft.com> wrote in message news:<41********@news.microsoft.com>...
What is the password?
The password is "rebadgemanager"

The best thing to do is change it in Access 97 or 2003 to something a bit
more A2000-friendly.
What would be more A2000-friendly - more to the point, why is
"rebadgemanager" *not* A2000-friendly?

Many thanks for your help.

Edward
--
The reading group's reading group:
http://www.bookgroup.org.uk


--
MichKa [MS]
NLS Collation/Locale/Keyboard Development
Globalization Infrastructure and Font Technologies
Windows International Division

This posting is provided "AS IS" with
no warranties, and confers no rights.

"Edward" <te********@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:25**************************@posting.google.c om...
My client has a database that was written in Access97. The database
is password protected.

If I try to open the database by double-clicking on it, it asks for
the password. In Access97, I can enter the password and open the
database.

Similarly in Access 2003.

But not in Access 2000 - I get a "Not a valid password" error.

I have tried this on at least ten machines, with a variety of o/s and
flavours of Access. It always succeeds with A97 and A2k3, but always
fails with A2k.

Is there anything that I can do?

Edward
--
The reading group's reading group:
http://www.bookgroup.org.uk

Nov 13 '05 #3

P: n/a
I have no idea -- but the best way to proceed is to try changing it?

It may be a limitation with Access 2000 opening password-protected 97
enabled dbs? In any case, the database password is so entirely useless from
a security standpoint that you could just remove the password to save the
headaches....
"Edward" <te********@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:25*************************@posting.google.co m...
"Michael \(michka\) Kaplan [MS]" <mi*****@online.microsoft.com> wrote in

message news:<41********@news.microsoft.com>...
What is the password?


The password is "rebadgemanager"

The best thing to do is change it in Access 97 or 2003 to something a bit more A2000-friendly.


What would be more A2000-friendly - more to the point, why is
"rebadgemanager" *not* A2000-friendly?

Many thanks for your help.

Edward
--
The reading group's reading group:
http://www.bookgroup.org.uk


--
MichKa [MS]
NLS Collation/Locale/Keyboard Development
Globalization Infrastructure and Font Technologies
Windows International Division

This posting is provided "AS IS" with
no warranties, and confers no rights.

"Edward" <te********@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:25**************************@posting.google.c om...
My client has a database that was written in Access97. The database
is password protected.

If I try to open the database by double-clicking on it, it asks for
the password. In Access97, I can enter the password and open the
database.

Similarly in Access 2003.

But not in Access 2000 - I get a "Not a valid password" error.

I have tried this on at least ten machines, with a variety of o/s and
flavours of Access. It always succeeds with A97 and A2k3, but always
fails with A2k.

Is there anything that I can do?

Edward
--
The reading group's reading group:
http://www.bookgroup.org.uk

Nov 13 '05 #4

P: n/a
"Michael \(michka\) Kaplan [MS]" <mi*****@online.microsoft.com> wrote in message news:<41********@news.microsoft.com>...
I have no idea -- but the best way to proceed is to try changing it?

It may be a limitation with Access 2000 opening password-protected 97
enabled dbs? In any case, the database password is so entirely useless from
a security standpoint that you could just remove the password to save the
headaches....


A quick update. I couldn't unset the password in Access 2003 - the
option was greyed out. I then opened the db in A97, where I removed
the password, and the db now opens fine in A2k. So many thanks for
your strategy, which worked.

Being a bit fastidious, and a completist, I would *still* like to know
why this happened, particularly because it had, until recently, worked
fine in all three flavours of Access. O well. Life's full of little
mysteries.

Edward
--
The reading group's reading group:
http://www.bookgroup.org.uk
Nov 13 '05 #5

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