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Access - web forms

P: n/a
dht
I want to use an Access web form for people to submit data on the company
intranet.

I currently have one table ("New PRoducts") that I am using for new products
and once that person has submitted the data and exited it is transfered to
another table.

I'm thinking that if there are lots of people using the "new product" table
will start to show those Items that other people have started putting in?

Can access detect someone accessing the DB fro the web form and create their
own unique new product table and then when they close the web form it moves
the records to the permanent store and deletes the unique new product table
for that person.

Is this possible and how would I go about writing code for this to work

Thanks for any help
Dave
Nov 13 '05 #1
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12 Replies


P: n/a
On Wed, 4 Aug 2004 11:25:31 +0100, "dht"
<dh*@removenospamwtbgroup.com> wrote:

Sounds like bad design to me. Use a single table, with an additional
column to identify eash user (if users log in), or use the SessionID
to distinguish them. There are many shopping cart code samples on the
Internet.
Btw, Access (better: Jet) is not recommended on the web if you have
more than a very light load.

-Tom.

I want to use an Access web form for people to submit data on the company
intranet.

I currently have one table ("New PRoducts") that I am using for new products
and once that person has submitted the data and exited it is transfered to
another table.

I'm thinking that if there are lots of people using the "new product" table
will start to show those Items that other people have started putting in?

Can access detect someone accessing the DB fro the web form and create their
own unique new product table and then when they close the web form it moves
the records to the permanent store and deletes the unique new product table
for that person.

Is this possible and how would I go about writing code for this to work

Thanks for any help
Dave


Nov 13 '05 #2

P: n/a
On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 07:05:27 -0700, Tom van Stiphout
<no*************@cox.net> wrote:
Btw, Access (better: Jet) is not recommended on the web if you have
more than a very light load.


Would you care to define "very light"?

- Jim
Nov 13 '05 #3

P: n/a
On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 14:20:18 GMT, Ji****@datacentricsolutions.com (Jim
Allensworth) wrote:

Only anecdotal, and from extrapolating how I think Jet works
internally. Given that, I think more than 5 concurrent users is
asking for trouble.
But no doubt the website will tell you!

-Tom.
On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 07:05:27 -0700, Tom van Stiphout
<no*************@cox.net> wrote:
Btw, Access (better: Jet) is not recommended on the web if you have
more than a very light load.


Would you care to define "very light"?

- Jim


Nov 13 '05 #4

P: n/a
In a web context it is more useful to think of concurrent connnections
rather than concurrent users. Assuming reasonably well written code
and using "ADODB.Connection" the load can be quite robust. Again it
depends on what your requirements are. One persons "light load" (say
25,000 db hits per day) might be someone elses capable load.

And there are also some caching libraries that can improve performance
even more. Having said that, Jet is no SQL server, but then again I
have heard people say that Access (of course they mean Jet along with
it) is just a toy only suitable for storing recipes and such. The
companies for whom I have built complex solutions with it would
disagree!

It depends on your requirements, that is why I was looking for your
definition.

- Jim

On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 19:00:55 -0700, Tom van Stiphout
<no*************@cox.net> wrote:
On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 14:20:18 GMT, Ji****@datacentricsolutions.com (Jim
Allensworth) wrote:

Only anecdotal, and from extrapolating how I think Jet works
internally. Given that, I think more than 5 concurrent users is
asking for trouble.
But no doubt the website will tell you!

-Tom.
On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 07:05:27 -0700, Tom van Stiphout
<no*************@cox.net> wrote:
Btw, Access (better: Jet) is not recommended on the web if you have
more than a very light load.


Would you care to define "very light"?

- Jim


Nov 13 '05 #5

P: n/a
On Thu, 05 Aug 2004 04:07:48 GMT, Ji****@datacentricsolutions.com (Jim
Allensworth) wrote:

I'd be willing to put my moeny where my mouth is.
What I mean is this: over time I've advocated more than once us
getting together to collect some meaningful metrics, that we and
others can use as guideline when designing a solution.
In my mind this would involve defining the problem, writing the code
to test the performance of the chosen solution, and publishing this.
So far no takers. Perhaps today is a new day.

-Tom.
In a web context it is more useful to think of concurrent connnections
rather than concurrent users. Assuming reasonably well written code
and using "ADODB.Connection" the load can be quite robust. Again it
depends on what your requirements are. One persons "light load" (say
25,000 db hits per day) might be someone elses capable load.

And there are also some caching libraries that can improve performance
even more. Having said that, Jet is no SQL server, but then again I
have heard people say that Access (of course they mean Jet along with
it) is just a toy only suitable for storing recipes and such. The
companies for whom I have built complex solutions with it would
disagree!

It depends on your requirements, that is why I was looking for your
definition.

- Jim

On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 19:00:55 -0700, Tom van Stiphout
<no*************@cox.net> wrote:
On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 14:20:18 GMT, Ji****@datacentricsolutions.com (Jim
Allensworth) wrote:

Only anecdotal, and from extrapolating how I think Jet works
internally. Given that, I think more than 5 concurrent users is
asking for trouble.
But no doubt the website will tell you!

-Tom.
On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 07:05:27 -0700, Tom van Stiphout
<no*************@cox.net> wrote:

Btw, Access (better: Jet) is not recommended on the web if you have
more than a very light load.
Would you care to define "very light"?

- Jim


Nov 13 '05 #6

P: n/a
You must have more money/time than I do. What you advocate is not a
trivial task, although I would also be interested in the results.
Until that time I have to also rely on anecdotal evidence and
experience - mine and others. Here is an interesting read on the
topic...

http://www.15seconds.com/Issue/010514.htm

My point is that cautioning others away from Jet in a web based
scenario is not giving Jet its due. Jet on a LAN and Jet in a
stateless disconnected setting are completely different animals. So I
would just say that the way I define "very light load" is likely
different than the way you define it.

BTW, today is always a new day. ;-)

- Jim

On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 21:23:36 -0700, Tom van Stiphout
<no*************@cox.net> wrote:
On Thu, 05 Aug 2004 04:07:48 GMT, Ji****@datacentricsolutions.com (Jim
Allensworth) wrote:

I'd be willing to put my moeny where my mouth is.
What I mean is this: over time I've advocated more than once us
getting together to collect some meaningful metrics, that we and
others can use as guideline when designing a solution.
In my mind this would involve defining the problem, writing the code
to test the performance of the chosen solution, and publishing this.
So far no takers. Perhaps today is a new day.

-Tom.
In a web context it is more useful to think of concurrent connnections
rather than concurrent users. Assuming reasonably well written code
and using "ADODB.Connection" the load can be quite robust. Again it
depends on what your requirements are. One persons "light load" (say
25,000 db hits per day) might be someone elses capable load.

And there are also some caching libraries that can improve performance
even more. Having said that, Jet is no SQL server, but then again I
have heard people say that Access (of course they mean Jet along with
it) is just a toy only suitable for storing recipes and such. The
companies for whom I have built complex solutions with it would
disagree!

It depends on your requirements, that is why I was looking for your
definition.

- Jim

On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 19:00:55 -0700, Tom van Stiphout
<no*************@cox.net> wrote:
On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 14:20:18 GMT, Ji****@datacentricsolutions.com (Jim
Allensworth) wrote:

Only anecdotal, and from extrapolating how I think Jet works
internally. Given that, I think more than 5 concurrent users is
asking for trouble.
But no doubt the website will tell you!

-Tom.

On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 07:05:27 -0700, Tom van Stiphout
<no*************@cox.net> wrote:

>Btw, Access (better: Jet) is not recommended on the web if you have
>more than a very light load.
>

Would you care to define "very light"?

- Jim


Nov 13 '05 #7

P: n/a
dht
Can someone tell me where to find an example of using the session ID. I
haven't been very successful in trying to do this.

Can I use a session ID to then restrict users to review only their entered
products from a web data page?

Thanks
D

"Tom van Stiphout" <no*************@cox.net> wrote in message
news:f1********************************@4ax.com...
On Wed, 4 Aug 2004 11:25:31 +0100, "dht"
<dh*@removenospamwtbgroup.com> wrote:

Sounds like bad design to me. Use a single table, with an additional
column to identify eash user (if users log in), or use the SessionID
to distinguish them. There are many shopping cart code samples on the
Internet.
Btw, Access (better: Jet) is not recommended on the web if you have
more than a very light load.

-Tom.

I want to use an Access web form for people to submit data on the company
intranet.

I currently have one table ("New PRoducts") that I am using for new productsand once that person has submitted the data and exited it is transfered toanother table.

I'm thinking that if there are lots of people using the "new product" tablewill start to show those Items that other people have started putting in?

Can access detect someone accessing the DB fro the web form and create theirown unique new product table and then when they close the web form it movesthe records to the permanent store and deletes the unique new product tablefor that person.

Is this possible and how would I go about writing code for this to work

Thanks for any help
Dave

Nov 13 '05 #8

P: n/a
Tom van Stiphout <no*************@cox.net> wrote in
news:tb********************************@4ax.com:
I'd be willing to put my moeny where my mouth is.
What I mean is this: over time I've advocated more than once us
getting together to collect some meaningful metrics, that we and
others can use as guideline when designing a solution.
In my mind this would involve defining the problem, writing the code
to test the performance of the chosen solution, and publishing this.
So far no takers. Perhaps today is a new day.

-Tom.


Where are you? I'm thinking Phoenix, but I have no idea why. Wherever, is it
warm in the winter? If it is, it sounds like a doubly great idea for that
time.

--
Lyle
--
use iso date format: yyyy-mm-dd
http://www.w3.org/QA/Tips/iso-date
--
The e-mail address isn't, but you could use it to find one.
Nov 13 '05 #9

P: n/a
"dht" <dh*@rem.ove.no.spa.mwtbgroup.com> wrote in
news:2n***********@uni-berlin.de:
Can someone tell me where to find an example of using the session ID. I
haven't been very successful in trying to do this.

Can I use a session ID to then restrict users to review only their
entered products from a web data page?


I haven't followed this thread from the beginning and apologize if the
following doesn't apply. I'm thinking about this in the conext of ASP.

The SessionID is created by the Server. Perhaps, you don't have enough
control over it to restrict use. But if you have a login screen, you
could, I think just set a Session variable at login time. Let's suppose
John Doe logs in and supplies the correct password. You could then create
a Session variable as Session("UserName") = "John Doe"
Now if you are opening an ASP Products page you could easily filter the
recordset based on that Session variable. Could you apply this to Access
DAPs? I dunno, but I doubt it. I suppose you could open ASP and the DAPs
from within ASP, but .... Is there a "Session" for DAPS? I dunno but I
doubt it. If there were, could you use it? I dunno but I doubt it.
Are DAPs really useful? I dunno but I doubt it. I use them for in-house
quick and dirty stuff when we want to share data updates on a net-enabled
MS-SQL database on company (not the database company) notebooks in North
America and Europe, and I don't want to take the time to write some ASP.
But as far as general public use goes, the inherent security vulnerability
of IE and its relationship with Windows (This is NUTS!) makes me go other
routes. I rarely use IE now. Sorry for rambling here.

--
Lyle
--
use iso date format: yyyy-mm-dd
http://www.w3.org/QA/Tips/iso-date
--
The e-mail address isn't, but you could use it to find one.
Nov 13 '05 #10

P: n/a
"dht" <dh*@rem.ove.no.spa.mwtbgroup.com> wrote in message news:<2n***********@uni-berlin.de>...
Can someone tell me where to find an example of using the session ID. I
haven't been very successful in trying to do this.

Can I use a session ID to then restrict users to review only their entered
products from a web data page?

Thanks


I emailed you some sample code. It was a little too long to post
here. The idea used tblSessionControl that contained among other
things SessionID, CartID and UserID. If the user left a cart with
items in it because of a disconnected session or not checking out, it
is easy to restore their cart when they log in and a UserID is
obtained.

James A. Fortune
Nov 13 '05 #11

P: n/a
On 5 Aug 2004 15:48:03 GMT, Lyle Fairfield <Lo******@FFDBA.Com> wrote:

Indeed I am. Or at least in a suburb of Phoenix.
Want to crash on my couch next winter? Be prepared that we'll call you
a snowbird, and expect you'll do 50 max in the fast lane.

-Tom.
Tom van Stiphout <no*************@cox.net> wrote in
news:tb********************************@4ax.com :
I'd be willing to put my moeny where my mouth is.
What I mean is this: over time I've advocated more than once us
getting together to collect some meaningful metrics, that we and
others can use as guideline when designing a solution.
In my mind this would involve defining the problem, writing the code
to test the performance of the chosen solution, and publishing this.
So far no takers. Perhaps today is a new day.

-Tom.


Where are you? I'm thinking Phoenix, but I have no idea why. Wherever, is it
warm in the winter? If it is, it sounds like a doubly great idea for that
time.

--
Lyle
--
use iso date format: yyyy-mm-dd
http://www.w3.org/QA/Tips/iso-date


Nov 13 '05 #12

P: n/a
Tom van Stiphout <no*************@cox.net> wrote in
news:23********************************@4ax.com:
On 5 Aug 2004 15:48:03 GMT, Lyle Fairfield <Lo******@FFDBA.Com> wrote:

Indeed I am. Or at least in a suburb of Phoenix.
Want to crash on my couch next winter? Be prepared that we'll call you
a snowbird, and expect you'll do 50 max in the fast lane.

-Tom.
Tom van Stiphout <no*************@cox.net> wrote in
news:tb********************************@4ax.co m:
I'd be willing to put my moeny where my mouth is.
What I mean is this: over time I've advocated more than once us
getting together to collect some meaningful metrics, that we and
others can use as guideline when designing a solution.
In my mind this would involve defining the problem, writing the code
to test the performance of the chosen solution, and publishing this.
So far no takers. Perhaps today is a new day.

-Tom.


Where are you? I'm thinking Phoenix, but I have no idea why. Wherever,
is it warm in the winter? If it is, it sounds like a doubly great idea
for that time.

--
Lyle
--
use iso date format: yyyy-mm-dd
http://www.w3.org/QA/Tips/iso-date


Great! In the meantime I'll find some pants that come up right under my
armpits, and practice complaining about the government so that I can fit
right in with them there birds.

--
Lyle
--
use iso date format: yyyy-mm-dd
http://www.w3.org/QA/Tips/iso-date
--
The e-mail address isn't, but you could use it to find one.
Nov 13 '05 #13

This discussion thread is closed

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