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Multiple instances of the same database...

P: n/a
I created an Access 97 database a while ago. It is protected by Workgroup
Security, and it is not split.

In order to compare different sets of results, a colleague has suggested
that it would be useful to run two instances of the same database on
separate screens of a two monitor set up.

I have actually tried this, and you can indeed open the file twice, log in
with the same Login/Password Details and view/navigate through the
application.

So, I seem to have answered my own question, but as a newbie, I am worried
about 'missing something'. I never actually intended the database to be used
as such, and so I am concerned about what impact running two instances of
the same database would have.

Is there potential for the database to be damaged by using it in this
manner?

Regards to all who can help with this issue,

Chris
(Splitting the database is not an option at this stage)
(The interface is purely via forms, and the suggested comparison of data is
not possible in the current version, hence running to versions)

Nov 13 '05 #1
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6 Replies


P: n/a
No particular harm. You've simply demonstrated to yourself that Access is a
multi-user system.

--
-Larry-
--

"Chris Tyson" <ch***********@btinternet.com> wrote in message
news:ca**********@sparta.btinternet.com...
I created an Access 97 database a while ago. It is protected by Workgroup
Security, and it is not split.

In order to compare different sets of results, a colleague has suggested
that it would be useful to run two instances of the same database on
separate screens of a two monitor set up.

I have actually tried this, and you can indeed open the file twice, log in
with the same Login/Password Details and view/navigate through the
application.

So, I seem to have answered my own question, but as a newbie, I am worried
about 'missing something'. I never actually intended the database to be used as such, and so I am concerned about what impact running two instances of
the same database would have.

Is there potential for the database to be damaged by using it in this
manner?

Regards to all who can help with this issue,

Chris
(Splitting the database is not an option at this stage)
(The interface is purely via forms, and the suggested comparison of data is not possible in the current version, hence running to versions)

Nov 13 '05 #2

P: n/a
My earlier reply assumed that you had two front ends pointed at the same
back end tables. If that's not the case you've done nothing any more
exciting than opening two instances of Excel or another application.

--
-Larry-
--

"Larry Daugherty" <La********************@verizon.net> wrote in message
news:Sf******************@nwrddc02.gnilink.net...
No particular harm. You've simply demonstrated to yourself that Access is a multi-user system.

--
-Larry-
--

"Chris Tyson" <ch***********@btinternet.com> wrote in message
news:ca**********@sparta.btinternet.com...
I created an Access 97 database a while ago. It is protected by Workgroup Security, and it is not split.

In order to compare different sets of results, a colleague has suggested
that it would be useful to run two instances of the same database on
separate screens of a two monitor set up.

I have actually tried this, and you can indeed open the file twice, log in with the same Login/Password Details and view/navigate through the
application.

So, I seem to have answered my own question, but as a newbie, I am worried about 'missing something'. I never actually intended the database to be

used
as such, and so I am concerned about what impact running two instances of the same database would have.

Is there potential for the database to be damaged by using it in this
manner?

Regards to all who can help with this issue,

Chris
(Splitting the database is not an option at this stage)
(The interface is purely via forms, and the suggested comparison of data

is
not possible in the current version, hence running to versions)


Nov 13 '05 #3

P: n/a
Thanks for swift response Larry. I kinda thought it would be OK, but the
reassurance is welcome.

Cheers,

Chris

"Larry Daugherty" <La********************@verizon.net> wrote in message
news:Sf******************@nwrddc02.gnilink.net...
No particular harm. You've simply demonstrated to yourself that Access is a multi-user system.

--
-Larry-
--

"Chris Tyson" <ch***********@btinternet.com> wrote in message
news:ca**********@sparta.btinternet.com...
I created an Access 97 database a while ago. It is protected by Workgroup Security, and it is not split.

In order to compare different sets of results, a colleague has suggested
that it would be useful to run two instances of the same database on
separate screens of a two monitor set up.

I have actually tried this, and you can indeed open the file twice, log in with the same Login/Password Details and view/navigate through the
application.

So, I seem to have answered my own question, but as a newbie, I am worried about 'missing something'. I never actually intended the database to be

used
as such, and so I am concerned about what impact running two instances of the same database would have.

Is there potential for the database to be damaged by using it in this
manner?

Regards to all who can help with this issue,

Chris
(Splitting the database is not an option at this stage)
(The interface is purely via forms, and the suggested comparison of data

is
not possible in the current version, hence running to versions)


Nov 13 '05 #4

P: n/a
Hi Larry, thanks for your responses.

The difference between Excel/Word etc and Access is that I cannot open
the same file as two instances.

With hindsight I should have gone the FrontEnd-BackEnd route, but never
did and it is too late to change now.

It is this that worries me. Access allows me to run two instances of the
same database/file on the same machine (regardless of whether it is single
or double monitor). If it was FrontEnd-BackEnd, then I would be entirely
happy. However it isn't, so I am concerned that something untoward may
happen. Since Access doesn't throw up any errors/warnings stating that
'another copy is open' or 'do you wish to revert to the saved version' etc
etc, I assume it knows what it is doing ;-)

As I said, bit of newbie, I wondered if more experienced users can shed
light on it.
(I promise, next time it will be FrontEnd-BackEnd...)

Cheers,
Chris

"Larry Daugherty" <La********************@verizon.net> wrote in message
news:ZQ*******************@nwrddc03.gnilink.net...
My earlier reply assumed that you had two front ends pointed at the same
back end tables. If that's not the case you've done nothing any more
exciting than opening two instances of Excel or another application.

--
-Larry-
--

"Larry Daugherty" <La********************@verizon.net> wrote in message
news:Sf******************@nwrddc02.gnilink.net...
No particular harm. You've simply demonstrated to yourself that Access is
a
multi-user system.

--
-Larry-
--

"Chris Tyson" <ch***********@btinternet.com> wrote in message
news:ca**********@sparta.btinternet.com...
I created an Access 97 database a while ago. It is protected by Workgroup Security, and it is not split.

In order to compare different sets of results, a colleague has suggested that it would be useful to run two instances of the same database on
separate screens of a two monitor set up.

I have actually tried this, and you can indeed open the file twice,
log
in with the same Login/Password Details and view/navigate through the
application.

So, I seem to have answered my own question, but as a newbie, I am worried about 'missing something'. I never actually intended the database to
be used
as such, and so I am concerned about what impact running two instances of the same database would have.

Is there potential for the database to be damaged by using it in this
manner?

Regards to all who can help with this issue,

Chris
(Splitting the database is not an option at this stage)
(The interface is purely via forms, and the suggested comparison of

data is
not possible in the current version, hence running to versions)



Nov 13 '05 #5

P: n/a
Hi Larry, thanks for your responses.

The difference between Excel/Word etc and Access is that I cannot open
the same file as two instances.

With hindsight I should have gone the FrontEnd-BackEnd route, but never
did and it is too late to change now.

It is this that worries me. Access allows me to run two instances of the
same database/file on the same machine (regardless of whether it is single
or double monitor). If it was FrontEnd-BackEnd, then I would be entirely
happy. However it isn't, so I am concerned that something untoward may
happen. Since Access doesn't throw up any errors/warnings stating that
'another copy is open' or 'do you wish to revert to the saved version' etc
etc, I assume it knows what it is doing ;-)

As I said, bit of newbie, I wondered if more experienced users can shed
light on it.
(I promise, next time it will be FrontEnd-BackEnd...)

Cheers,
Chris

"Larry Daugherty" <La********************@verizon.net> wrote in message
news:ZQ*******************@nwrddc03.gnilink.net...
My earlier reply assumed that you had two front ends pointed at the same
back end tables. If that's not the case you've done nothing any more
exciting than opening two instances of Excel or another application.

--
-Larry-
--

"Larry Daugherty" <La********************@verizon.net> wrote in message
news:Sf******************@nwrddc02.gnilink.net...
No particular harm. You've simply demonstrated to yourself that Access is
a
multi-user system.

--
-Larry-
--

"Chris Tyson" <ch***********@btinternet.com> wrote in message
news:ca**********@sparta.btinternet.com...
I created an Access 97 database a while ago. It is protected by Workgroup Security, and it is not split.

In order to compare different sets of results, a colleague has suggested that it would be useful to run two instances of the same database on
separate screens of a two monitor set up.

I have actually tried this, and you can indeed open the file twice,
log
in with the same Login/Password Details and view/navigate through the
application.

So, I seem to have answered my own question, but as a newbie, I am worried about 'missing something'. I never actually intended the database to
be used
as such, and so I am concerned about what impact running two instances of the same database would have.

Is there potential for the database to be damaged by using it in this
manner?

Regards to all who can help with this issue,

Chris
(Splitting the database is not an option at this stage)
(The interface is purely via forms, and the suggested comparison of

data is
not possible in the current version, hence running to versions)



Nov 13 '05 #6

P: n/a
You'd be better off to split the database and have all front ends point at
the same back end. No matter how late in the day it seems it's almost
always better than a monolithic design. Consider the case of modifying the
design: If your table design hasn't changed then you'd only need to change
the front end without risk to your data (make a backup before changing
things anyway :-) ).

Tony Toews has a nifty tool for synchronizing things that's downloadable
from his site. Look for FE Updater.

HTH
--
-Larry-
--

"Chris Tyson" <ch***********@btinternet.com> wrote in message
news:ca**********@titan.btinternet.com...
Thanks for swift response Larry. I kinda thought it would be OK, but the
reassurance is welcome.

Cheers,

Chris

"Larry Daugherty" <La********************@verizon.net> wrote in message
news:Sf******************@nwrddc02.gnilink.net...
No particular harm. You've simply demonstrated to yourself that Access is
a
multi-user system.

--
-Larry-
--

"Chris Tyson" <ch***********@btinternet.com> wrote in message
news:ca**********@sparta.btinternet.com...
I created an Access 97 database a while ago. It is protected by Workgroup Security, and it is not split.

In order to compare different sets of results, a colleague has suggested that it would be useful to run two instances of the same database on
separate screens of a two monitor set up.

I have actually tried this, and you can indeed open the file twice,
log
in with the same Login/Password Details and view/navigate through the
application.

So, I seem to have answered my own question, but as a newbie, I am worried about 'missing something'. I never actually intended the database to
be used
as such, and so I am concerned about what impact running two instances of the same database would have.

Is there potential for the database to be damaged by using it in this
manner?

Regards to all who can help with this issue,

Chris
(Splitting the database is not an option at this stage)
(The interface is purely via forms, and the suggested comparison of

data is
not possible in the current version, hence running to versions)



Nov 13 '05 #7

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.