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Where to learn VB

P: n/a
Guru's,
From most of the posts here, I can see that knowledge of VB is a great
advantage. Could anyone suggest a good site to learn VB from starting at the
very beginning as I have no experience whatsoever.

Many thanks,

Mark
Nov 12 '05 #1
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4 Replies


P: n/a
Mark Reed wrote:
Guru's,
From most of the posts here, I can see that knowledge of VB is a great
advantage. Could anyone suggest a good site to learn VB from starting at the
very beginning as I have no experience whatsoever.


I generally start learning something from the help/manuals with the
given product then maybe progress to a book, hopefully by then not
requiring a beginners level book but something that will last a bit
longer as serve as a reference.

--
Error reading sig - A)bort R)etry I)nfluence with large hammer
Nov 12 '05 #2

P: n/a
Mark Reed wrote:
Guru's,
From most of the posts here, I can see that knowledge of VB is a great
advantage. Could anyone suggest a good site to learn VB from starting at the
very beginning as I have no experience whatsoever.

Many thanks,

Mark

Try one of the Microsoft Step-by-step books. You have to do the
exercises to gain any benefit.

Nov 12 '05 #3

P: n/a
On Mon, 3 May 2004 10:18:36 +0100, "Mark Reed"
<ma*********@ntlworld.com> wrote:
Guru's,
From most of the posts here, I can see that knowledge of VB is a great
advantage. Could anyone suggest a good site to learn VB from starting at the
very beginning as I have no experience whatsoever.

Many thanks,

Mark


Hey Mark,

From my personal experience, if you're proficient at one programming
language, you may be surprised at how fast you can pick up on another.
Especially if you stay within the Microsoft product line, ie MS FoxPro
to MS Access/VBA to MS C++. They all are similar in certain ways.

Just go to your local Barne's and Noble and pick out what you deem
most helpful.
Nov 12 '05 #4

P: n/a
gm*****@nospam-mobileregister.com (G. Miller) wrote in message news:<40***************@newsgroups.bellsouth.net>. ..
On Mon, 3 May 2004 10:18:36 +0100, "Mark Reed"
<ma*********@ntlworld.com> wrote:
Guru's,
From most of the posts here, I can see that knowledge of VB is a great
advantage. Could anyone suggest a good site to learn VB from starting at the
very beginning as I have no experience whatsoever.

Many thanks,

Mark


Hey Mark,

From my personal experience, if you're proficient at one programming
language, you may be surprised at how fast you can pick up on another.
Especially if you stay within the Microsoft product line, ie MS FoxPro
to MS Access/VBA to MS C++. They all are similar in certain ways.

Just go to your local Barne's and Noble and pick out what you deem
most helpful.


After you learn VB, I also suggest you also learn VC++. Then go back
to using VB :-). Programming later in VC++ if done with care will
allow you to pick up some good habits, or even a style that tends to
be generic enough to work well for both languages. Since VBA in
Access is such a RAD environment I haven't been able to do much
programming in VC++ for years because it takes twice as long to get
something out. It may be different for those who use VC++ constantly,
but it's hard for me to beat the speed of getting things up in Access.

I've been fortunate and am fortunate to have sympathetic clients who
gave me paid projects to learn new languages. My first ASP project
was a huge ecommerce application. I had similar on-the-job learning
opportunities for Paradox 4.5, Visual Basic, Access 2.0, VC++,
TeX/LaTeX, PostScript, Adobe PDF, HTML and others. I am very grateful
to them for creating those opportunities. Google newsgroups cut down
the time to learn new languages considerably. I am also indebted to
Oakland University for giving me library privileges, especially their
ebook service that allows me to check out and read computer books
online at odd hours. I need to send them a large donation. Barnes &
Noble and Border's are the preferred bookstores in my neighborhood for
computer books.

Access programming has been very good for me. One of my clients has
offered me a full time job for life. I had to convince them that me
doing other work for other companies was in their best interest. I
have been doing work on a referral only basis for over eight years.
Still, a good Access programmer can go into a business and immediately
suggest ways that database programming can help them, essentially
creating new work out of thin air. I wish you success in your
endeavors to learn VB.

James A. Fortune
Nov 12 '05 #5

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