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Are Access Forms Polymorphic?

P: n/a
In response to different users or situations (data context) I
transform the appearance and characteristics of Access Forms through
code. This seems to fit in with the idea of polymorphism. Do people
consider Access Forms to be Polymorphic?

James A. Fortune
Nov 12 '05 #1
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7 Replies


P: n/a
James Fortune wrote:
In response to different users or situations (data context) I
transform the appearance and characteristics of Access Forms through
code. This seems to fit in with the idea of polymorphism. Do people
consider Access Forms to be Polymorphic?

James A. Fortune


They can morph yes, but then so can just about anything that has a
programming language behind it.

--
Error reading sig - A)bort R)etry I)nfluence with large hammer
Nov 12 '05 #2

P: n/a

"James Fortune" wrote
In response to different users or
situations (data context) I
transform the appearance and
characteristics of Access Forms
through code. This seems to fit in
with the idea of polymorphism. Do
people consider Access Forms to
be Polymorphic?


Hmm. From your description, perhaps "Polychromatic" would be a better
description. However, somehow I don't think that is what is meant by
"polymorphism".

Larry Linson
Microsoft Access MVP
Nov 12 '05 #3

P: n/a
"Larry Linson" <bo*****@localhost.not> wrote in news:IdFjc.91913$L31.20613
@nwrddc01.gnilink.net:
Hmm. From your description, perhaps "Polychromatic" would be a better
description. However, somehow I don't think that is what is meant by
"polymorphism".


Polymorphism means Muchly Dead. In the Access world the term refers to DAO!

--
Lyle
(for e-mail refer to http://ffdba.com/contacts.htm)
Nov 12 '05 #4

P: n/a
"Lyle Fairfield" wrote
Hmm. From your description, perhaps
"Polychromatic" would be a better
description. However, somehow I don't
think that is what is meant by
"polymorphism".


Polymorphism means Muchly Dead. In the
Access world the term refers to DAO!


Ah, and sad that would be, if true, for anyone wantin' to use Jet to store a
little data.
Nov 12 '05 #5

P: n/a
"In object-oriented programming, the term is used to describe a variable
that may refer to objects whose class is not known at compile time and which
respond at run time according to the actual class of the object to which
they refer. " (http://wombat.doc.ic.ac.uk/foldoc/fo...gi?polymorphic)

Variables of type Access.Form are polymorphic: They may refer to any form
class, and respond at run-time according the actual class of the object to
which they refer. Variables of type Object are even more polymorphic: they
can refer to any object class.

The word polymorphic is derived from the idea 'many structures'. An Access
form can change structures: it may be in Form or Datasheet mode, so it is
polymorphic (bimorphic???) in a general sense. But since it is an Object,
not a Variable or Function, it would not, in it self, mean that Access or
VBA 'supported polymorphism'.

Changing the appearance and characteristics of an object is not the same as
changing the structure, so it would not generally be called polymorphism. In
fantasy terms, Shape-changing or death is morphing: changing the appearance
and characteristics is just Glamour.

(david)

"James Fortune" <ja******@oakland.edu> wrote in message
news:a6**************************@posting.google.c om...
In response to different users or situations (data context) I
transform the appearance and characteristics of Access Forms through
code. This seems to fit in with the idea of polymorphism. Do people
consider Access Forms to be Polymorphic?

James A. Fortune

Nov 12 '05 #6

P: n/a
On Wed, 28 Apr 2004 14:02:42 +1000, "david epsom dot com dot au"
<david@epsomdotcomdotau> wrote:

You call an Access form "bi" ! You want a piece of me?

-Tom.
"In object-oriented programming, the term is used to describe a variable
that may refer to objects whose class is not known at compile time and which
respond at run time according to the actual class of the object to which
they refer. " (http://wombat.doc.ic.ac.uk/foldoc/fo...gi?polymorphic)

Variables of type Access.Form are polymorphic: They may refer to any form
class, and respond at run-time according the actual class of the object to
which they refer. Variables of type Object are even more polymorphic: they
can refer to any object class.

The word polymorphic is derived from the idea 'many structures'. An Access
form can change structures: it may be in Form or Datasheet mode, so it is
polymorphic (bimorphic???) in a general sense. But since it is an Object,
not a Variable or Function, it would not, in it self, mean that Access or
VBA 'supported polymorphism'.

Changing the appearance and characteristics of an object is not the same as
changing the structure, so it would not generally be called polymorphism. In
fantasy terms, Shape-changing or death is morphing: changing the appearance
and characteristics is just Glamour.

(david)

"James Fortune" <ja******@oakland.edu> wrote in message
news:a6**************************@posting.google. com...
In response to different users or situations (data context) I
transform the appearance and characteristics of Access Forms through
code. This seems to fit in with the idea of polymorphism. Do people
consider Access Forms to be Polymorphic?

James A. Fortune


Nov 12 '05 #7

P: n/a
Tom van Stiphout wrote:
On Wed, 28 Apr 2004 14:02:42 +1000, "david epsom dot com dot au"
<david@epsomdotcomdotau> wrote:

You call an Access form "bi" ! You want a piece of me?


Oi, this Dowe Egbert's coffee is expensive, stop trying to make me lose
it on my keyboard :-)

--
Error reading sig - A)bort R)etry I)nfluence with large hammer
Nov 12 '05 #8

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