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Workgroup Security Failing across a LAN - any ideas out there?

P: n/a
My problem is this:

I have created a database, using Workgroup security features. Unique
Workgroup. New users added. Permissions to Admins, Admin, and Users revoked.
'Ownership' of database objects has been given to a custom User, and has not
been left as owned by Admins.

I transfer this file (and its Workgroup) to a shared drive on a LAN.
From the original client PC that originated the file, the database cannot be
opened without invoking the appropriate Workgroup. All well and good.

BUT, when accessing the database from another client PC on the LAN I can
open it (the database) without the unique Workgroup, and without any
problems and full access to all areas of the database.
Now, I know you are thinking that I have not revoked permissions in Admins
etc. I have, see below 'cos this gets wierder...

Let's call the database 'DatBas', and say it's on a shared drive 'K:'

So, 'K:\DatBas' is its location.

When I open 'K:\DatBas' via the PC that originally contained the file, as
noted above I need to invoke its Workgroup and enter correct
Usernames/Passwords.

When I view 'User and Groups Permissions' under Tools/Security. Admins Group
has all permissions revoked. As it should be.

BUT

When I open K:\DatBas via any other PC on the network, not only do I
breeze through without any invokation of the associated Workgroup, when I
view 'User and Groups Permissions' under Tools/Security. Admins Group has
all permissions GRANTED.

HOW ON EARTH can the same file, when viewed on different machines, have
different Group permissions assigned?
It is the same file! Why (How?) can another PC simply reset the Admins Group
Permissions of its own accord?

I have sent this file to a colleague who uses a different LAN, and the same
thing happens.

What else can I tell you? Well, I store the Workgroup file in the same
location on the shared drive (i.e. so its not on the local C: drive of any
machine);
The version I'm using is Access 97.

Any thoughts out there?

Chris


Nov 12 '05 #1
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4 Replies


P: n/a

On Fri, 16 Apr 2004 17:35:02 +0000 (UTC), "Chris Tyson"
<ch***********@btinternet.com> wrote in comp.databases.ms-access:
Any thoughts out there?


Re-read the security white paper. Then secure the db again, using the
security wizard. Your problems will go away. Changing ownership of
objects is important, but doing it casually through the ui rarely
results in a proper implementation. Use the security wizard, after
logging in as a custom user, secure the file, then modify permissions
as you see fit.

Peter Miller
__________________________________________________ __________
PK Solutions -- Data Recovery for Microsoft Access/Jet/SQL
Free quotes, Guaranteed lowest prices and best results
www.pksolutions.com 1.866.FILE.FIX 1.760.476.9051
Nov 12 '05 #2

P: n/a
That is something I can certainly try,

I've done a lot of work on the database since I created the unique
Workgroup/created custom users/revoked the Users-Admins permissions/changed
ownership of objects etc., etc, etc. I presume that Security Wizard will
need a 'virgin' security setup (i.e. default) to work, so that may be a
problem. I don't have a recent useable version that has not been 'secured'
by my own hand.

I'll look into it, and also the read the white paper.

Thanks Pete,

Chris

"Peter Miller" <pm*****@pksolutions.com> wrote in message
news:n2********************************@4ax.com...

On Fri, 16 Apr 2004 17:35:02 +0000 (UTC), "Chris Tyson"
<ch***********@btinternet.com> wrote in comp.databases.ms-access:
Any thoughts out there?


Re-read the security white paper. Then secure the db again, using the
security wizard. Your problems will go away. Changing ownership of
objects is important, but doing it casually through the ui rarely
results in a proper implementation. Use the security wizard, after
logging in as a custom user, secure the file, then modify permissions
as you see fit.

Peter Miller
__________________________________________________ __________
PK Solutions -- Data Recovery for Microsoft Access/Jet/SQL
Free quotes, Guaranteed lowest prices and best results
www.pksolutions.com 1.866.FILE.FIX 1.760.476.9051

Nov 12 '05 #3

P: n/a

On Fri, 16 Apr 2004 19:38:24 +0000 (UTC), "Chris Tyson"
<ch***********@btinternet.com> wrote in comp.databases.ms-access:
I've done a lot of work on the database since I created the unique
Workgroup/created custom users/revoked the Users-Admins permissions/changed
ownership of objects etc., etc, etc. I presume that Security Wizard will
need a 'virgin' security setup (i.e. default) to work, so that may be a
problem.


Well, yes and no. The security wizard does not in fact require a
'virgin' unsecured file. All it requires is that you, the current
user, have rights to everything. So just log in as your power user,
then run the security wizard. That's the 'no, it isnt a problem'
part.

The 'yes it is a problem' part is that I'm not sure the wizard won't
mangle some of your custom settings. Remember that the point of the
wizard is to *deny* rights to common user and group accounts. So if
you created brand new groups and brand new users, and assigned
membership and rights, you may be fine. But if you set up rights for
the copmmon users group, you may have a problem.

Peter Miller
__________________________________________________ __________
PK Solutions -- Data Recovery for Microsoft Access/Jet/SQL
Free quotes, Guaranteed lowest prices and best results
www.pksolutions.com 1.866.FILE.FIX 1.760.476.9051
Nov 12 '05 #4

P: n/a
Peter,

Your suggestions appear to have solved my problems.

Many, many thanks,

Chris

Well, yes and no. The security wizard does not in fact require a
'virgin' unsecured file. All it requires is that you, the current
user, have rights to everything. So just log in as your power user,
then run the security wizard. That's the 'no, it isnt a problem'
part.

Nov 12 '05 #5

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