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Access 2.0 Multiuser Application

P: n/a
Acees 2.0 application when user run application it give following
error.
The database is opened by user "Admin" on machine "abc". you can not
open this database exclusively.

Please help me
usman
Nov 12 '05 #1
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"marifusman" <ma********@yahoo.com> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:ca**************************@posting.google.c om...
Acees 2.0 application when user run application it give following
error.
The database is opened by user "Admin" on machine "abc". you can not
open this database exclusively.

Please help me


Then do not open the database exclusively or twice at the same time-;)

Sometimes, there is a .ldb-file remaining in the directory where the
database is. Delete it and try again

Peter
Nov 12 '05 #2

P: n/a
"Peter Steimann[MVP Access]" wrote
Acees 2.0 application when user run
application it give following
error.
The database is opened by user "Admin"
on machine "abc". you can not open this
database exclusively.
Then do not open the database exclusively
or twice at the same time-;)

Sometimes, there is a .ldb-file remaining in the
directory where the database is. Delete it and
try again


As I recall, Access 2.0 does NOT ever delete the .ldb file. But, I did quite
a few multiuser databases in Access 2.0 and that was never a problem.

The kind of problem leads me to believe that the original poster has
multiple users attempting to open the same front-end or monolithic database.
That was as bad an idea in Access 2.0 as it is now and has been in every
intervening version. Every user should have his/her own copy of the front
end, linked to the shared tables in the back end.

However, this can also happen in cases of "mild" database corruption -- that
is, it's corrupted enough to be a problem but not enough to prevent all use.

Larry Linson
Microsoft Access MVP
Nov 12 '05 #3

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