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Access vs. SQL

P: n/a
Can anyone tell me if there is any limitations as to using Access for a web
based database as opposed to using SQL. Is there a number of records
constraint or performance issues? Thanks.

de******@aol.com
Nov 12 '05 #1
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8 Replies


P: n/a
On 17 Feb 2004 19:55:02 GMT, de******@aol.com (Deforgel) wrote:
Can anyone tell me if there is any limitations as to using Access for a web
based database as opposed to using SQL. Is there a number of records
constraint or performance issues? Thanks.

de******@aol.com


You really ought to do a google groups search on this issue. It is
mulit-faceted and has been hashed and rehashed so many times.

I just now put the phrase "web database Access Vs SQL Server" in and
got 10,800 returns.

- Jim
Nov 12 '05 #2

P: n/a
In general, an Access database will not scale well for a web-based
application.
If it's a "private" application, where you are sure there won't be heavy use
by many users, you might get away with Access.
But for a commercial, 24-7 database, I'd recommend SQL Server or some
similar database.

HTH
- Turtle

"Deforgel" <de******@aol.com> wrote in message
news:20***************************@mb-m28.aol.com...
Can anyone tell me if there is any limitations as to using Access for a web based database as opposed to using SQL. Is there a number of records
constraint or performance issues? Thanks.

de******@aol.com

Nov 12 '05 #3

P: n/a
It's all in the definitions. What is a "private" application?
(Presumably not well known to the public.) What is "heavy use"?
Would you consider 25,000 hits a day as light? medium? heavy?
A decently written ASP Jet application can handle that.
Take a look at...

http://www.15seconds.com/Issue/010514.htm

Now that's not Amazon certainly; but what are the requirements?
And, if you do need to scale because of success - that's a nice
problem to have.

- Jim

On Wed, 18 Feb 2004 03:46:04 GMT, "MacDermott" <ma********@nospam.com>
wrote:
In general, an Access database will not scale well for a web-based
application.
If it's a "private" application, where you are sure there won't be heavy use
by many users, you might get away with Access.
But for a commercial, 24-7 database, I'd recommend SQL Server or some
similar database.

HTH
- Turtle

"Deforgel" <de******@aol.com> wrote in message
news:20***************************@mb-m28.aol.com...
Can anyone tell me if there is any limitations as to using Access for a

web
based database as opposed to using SQL. Is there a number of records
constraint or performance issues? Thanks.

de******@aol.com



Nov 12 '05 #4

P: n/a
As I understand it, it's not so much the hits per day as the simultaneous
hits.
I'd guess that if your 25,000 hits all came within a few minutes of each
other, Access would crash.
Especially if they involved not just reading data, but writing it and
editing existing records.
Besides that,
1. An Access database must be "taken down" periodically for compacting.
2. Access does not support transactions the way client-server databases
do, so if it does crash (something as freakish as a power interruption to
the server), it's more difficult and less reliable to restore.

Don't get me wrong --
I've written ASP using an Access database, and as far as I know it's
running just fine.
That was a system for under 100 users across the country to enter (and
generate reports on) data about once a month. (That's what I was trying to
describe with the word "private".)
Anything "bigger" than Access would have been overkill in that
situation.
So I'm not totally opposed to using Access as a web database -
I just realize that there are many situations where it might not be
appropriate.

HTH
- Turtle

"Jim Allensworth" <Ji****@NOTdatacentricsolutions.com> wrote in message
news:40***************@netnews.comcast.net...
It's all in the definitions. What is a "private" application?
(Presumably not well known to the public.) What is "heavy use"?
Would you consider 25,000 hits a day as light? medium? heavy?
A decently written ASP Jet application can handle that.
Take a look at...

http://www.15seconds.com/Issue/010514.htm

Now that's not Amazon certainly; but what are the requirements?
And, if you do need to scale because of success - that's a nice
problem to have.

- Jim

On Wed, 18 Feb 2004 03:46:04 GMT, "MacDermott" <ma********@nospam.com>
wrote:
In general, an Access database will not scale well for a web-based
application.
If it's a "private" application, where you are sure there won't be heavy useby many users, you might get away with Access.
But for a commercial, 24-7 database, I'd recommend SQL Server or some
similar database.

HTH
- Turtle

"Deforgel" <de******@aol.com> wrote in message
news:20***************************@mb-m28.aol.com...
Can anyone tell me if there is any limitations as to using Access for a

web
based database as opposed to using SQL. Is there a number of records
constraint or performance issues? Thanks.

de******@aol.com


Nov 12 '05 #5

P: n/a
Now for some blasphemy on this group:

I use a Linux server with MySQL as DB and msAccess as frontend through
ODBC. The longest uptime was 6 month, after which I had to restart for
some non-db related reason.
Advantages: cheap, fast, secure, not complicated
Disadvantage: Microsoft-people don't like it.

Mike
Nov 12 '05 #6

P: n/a
On 18 Feb 2004 06:34:14 -0800, bo****@antonius.net (Mike Bosschaert)
wrote:
Now for some blasphemy on this group:

I use a Linux server with MySQL as DB and msAccess as frontend through
ODBC. The longest uptime was 6 month, after which I had to restart for
some non-db related reason.
Advantages: cheap, fast, secure, not complicated
Disadvantage: Microsoft-people don't like it.

I don't see that as blasphemous. I have heard good stuff about MySQL
and Access. But this thread is about web databases. And of course
there MySQL shines.

- Jim
Nov 12 '05 #7

P: n/a
On Wed, 18 Feb 2004 12:20:51 GMT, "MacDermott" <ma********@nospam.com>
wrote:
As I understand it, it's not so much the hits per day as the simultaneous
hits.
I'd guess that if your 25,000 hits all came within a few minutes of each
other, Access would crash.
Oh, a DOS attack <g>. While that would be a lot, there is caching
available to help with that problem. (noted in the link that I
provided) And of course you are describing an extreme situation.
Especially if they involved not just reading data, but writing it and
editing existing records.
Besides that,
1. An Access database must be "taken down" periodically for compacting.
The need for compacting is usually a result of allowing deletions.
Don't do deletes just flag the records. That doesn't mean you will
never have to compact. Just not as frequently.
2. Access does not support transactions the way client-server databases
do, so if it does crash (something as freakish as a power interruption to
the server), it's more difficult and less reliable to restore.

Don't get me wrong --
I've written ASP using an Access database, and as far as I know it's
running just fine.
That was a system for under 100 users across the country to enter (and
generate reports on) data about once a month. (That's what I was trying to
describe with the word "private".)
Anything "bigger" than Access would have been overkill in that
situation.
So I'm not totally opposed to using Access as a web database -
I just realize that there are many situations where it might not be
appropriate.


Agreed.

- Jim
Nov 12 '05 #8

P: n/a
bo****@antonius.net (Mike Bosschaert) wrote:
Now for some blasphemy on this group:
<smile>
I use a Linux server with MySQL as DB and msAccess as frontend through
ODBC. The longest uptime was 6 month, after which I had to restart for
some non-db related reason.
Advantages: cheap, fast, secure, not complicated
Disadvantage: Microsoft-people don't like it.


MySQL has nowhere near the featues of SQL Server but I also hear the folks are
working on those fast.

Tony
--
Tony Toews, Microsoft Access MVP
Please respond only in the newsgroups so that others can
read the entire thread of messages.
Microsoft Access Links, Hints, Tips & Accounting Systems at
http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm
Nov 12 '05 #9

This discussion thread is closed

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