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Reservation system in Access?

P: n/a
Would you use Access to create a car rental reservation system? I would
think that the complexity of such a system would be better suited to a
procedural language like Visual Basic or C++. Your thoughts, please.

Robert
Nov 12 '05 #1
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11 Replies


P: n/a
Visual Basic for Applications is part of Access.
Development with VBA/Access is up to 3 times as fast as development in
Visual Basic where, after all, you're going to need some sort of database
storage, too.

HTH
- Turtle

"Robert" <pr**********@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:10*************@corp.supernews.com...
Would you use Access to create a car rental reservation system? I would
think that the complexity of such a system would be better suited to a
procedural language like Visual Basic or C++. Your thoughts, please.

Robert

Nov 12 '05 #2

P: n/a
On Sun, 15 Feb 2004 13:50:04 GMT, MacDermott wrote:
Visual Basic for Applications is part of Access.
Development with VBA/Access is up to 3 times as fast as development in
Visual Basic where, after all, you're going to need some sort of database
storage, too.

HTH
- Turtle

"Robert" <pr**********@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:10*************@corp.supernews.com...
Would you use Access to create a car rental reservation system? I would
think that the complexity of such a system would be better suited to a
procedural language like Visual Basic or C++. Your thoughts, please.

Robert


Nice thing about Access, is all the tools/requirements to drive a data
service are right there and automated for you. Most of the design tools
(controls etc.) in Access are specifically designed to run off of
tables/queries and handle all the connectivity for you. Even with all of
Access's faults, you're hard pressed to find a simpler environment with
the same functionality.

--
Mike Storr
veraccess.com
Nov 12 '05 #3

P: n/a
"Robert" <pr**********@yahoo.com> wrote in
news:10*************@corp.supernews.com:
Would you use Access to create a car rental reservation system? I would
think that the complexity of such a system would be better suited to a
procedural language like Visual Basic or C++. Your thoughts, please.


The success of any application is 90% dependent on its developer and not on
the platform upon which it is developed.
There is probably no agreement about classifying VB and C++ as procedural.
Many call them Object Oriented. In the database world, I believe
"procedural" more commonly refers to X-Base languages such as those used in
DBase III, FoxBase and FoxPro (underneath).
If one is not experienced with and knowledgeable about these technologies one
is not likely to create any complex system successfully. It may be better to
search for an off-the-shelf solution.

--
Lyle
(for e-mail refer to http://ffdba.com/contacts.htm)
Nov 12 '05 #4

P: n/a
That sounds like a database project to me. So use a database development
system. Like Access.

What makes you think it's 'complex'? IMHO the complexity of a system can't
be measured until you've done a great deal of work in analysis. And if it is
complex the chances are that the complexity is in the data structures -
tables and how they relate to each other. In which case a database
development system is what you need. Like Access.

Of course if it's very very complex then you probably need to program it
properly. In which case assembler is the obvious answer.<g>

As has been pointed out, won't this just be standard vertical market
software that somebody has already written?

Yours, Mike MacSween

"Robert" <pr**********@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:10*************@corp.supernews.com...
Would you use Access to create a car rental reservation system? I would
think that the complexity of such a system would be better suited to a
procedural language like Visual Basic or C++. Your thoughts, please.

Robert

Nov 12 '05 #5

P: n/a

"Mike MacSween" <mi***********************@btinternet.com> wrote in message
news:40**********************@news.aaisp.net.uk...
That sounds like a database project to me. So use a database development
system. Like Access.

What makes you think it's 'complex'? IMHO the complexity of a system can't
be measured until you've done a great deal of work in analysis. And if it is complex the chances are that the complexity is in the data structures -
tables and how they relate to each other. In which case a database
development system is what you need. Like Access.

Of course if it's very very complex then you probably need to program it
properly. In which case assembler is the obvious answer.<g>

As has been pointed out, won't this just be standard vertical market
software that somebody has already written?

Yours, Mike MacSween

"Robert" <pr**********@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:10*************@corp.supernews.com...
Would you use Access to create a car rental reservation system? I would
think that the complexity of such a system would be better suited to a
procedural language like Visual Basic or C++. Your thoughts, please.

Robert



A previous poster evidently hasn't found any!
Robert
Nov 12 '05 #6

P: n/a

"Mike Storr" <st******@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
news:1s*****************************@40tude.net...
On Sun, 15 Feb 2004 13:50:04 GMT, MacDermott wrote:
Visual Basic for Applications is part of Access.
Development with VBA/Access is up to 3 times as fast as development in
Visual Basic where, after all, you're going to need some sort of database storage, too.

HTH
- Turtle

"Robert" <pr**********@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:10*************@corp.supernews.com...
Would you use Access to create a car rental reservation system? I would think that the complexity of such a system would be better suited to a
procedural language like Visual Basic or C++. Your thoughts, please.

Robert


Nice thing about Access, is all the tools/requirements to drive a data
service are right there and automated for you. Most of the design tools
(controls etc.) in Access are specifically designed to run off of
tables/queries and handle all the connectivity for you. Even with all of
Access's faults, you're hard pressed to find a simpler environment with
the same functionality.

--
Mike Storr
veraccess.com


Then why does anyone use Visual Basic?
Robert
Nov 12 '05 #7

P: n/a
Reasons to use Visual Basic:
1. For non-database applications.
2. For applications which require complex graphic ActiveX controls.
3. Need to distribute with a small footprint.
(Access must be present on the machine where the Access application
is run. A runtime version of Access can be distributed with the
application, but this is 70-120 MB - not feasible, for example, for
downloading over a dial-up connection.)
I'm sure other developers can add to this list.

- Turtle

"Robert" <pr**********@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:10*************@corp.supernews.com...

"Mike Storr" <st******@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
news:1s*****************************@40tude.net...
On Sun, 15 Feb 2004 13:50:04 GMT, MacDermott wrote:
Visual Basic for Applications is part of Access.
Development with VBA/Access is up to 3 times as fast as development in
Visual Basic where, after all, you're going to need some sort of database storage, too.

HTH
- Turtle

"Robert" <pr**********@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:10*************@corp.supernews.com...
> Would you use Access to create a car rental reservation system? I would> think that the complexity of such a system would be better suited to a> procedural language like Visual Basic or C++. Your thoughts, please.
>
> Robert
>
>


Nice thing about Access, is all the tools/requirements to drive a data
service are right there and automated for you. Most of the design tools
(controls etc.) in Access are specifically designed to run off of
tables/queries and handle all the connectivity for you. Even with all of
Access's faults, you're hard pressed to find a simpler environment with
the same functionality.

--
Mike Storr
veraccess.com


Then why does anyone use Visual Basic?
Robert

Nov 12 '05 #8

P: n/a
"Robert" <pr**********@yahoo.com> wrote in news:102vtdna4rn3d95
@corp.supernews.com:
Then why does anyone use Visual Basic?


Asking that here is like asking Canadians why they elected George Bush.

When I use Visual Basic (rarely) I do so for one of these reasons:

- it's easy to make useful com objects available as a dymanimic link
library in VB
- it MAY be easier to distribute a VB application
- VB can compile to native code ... floating point operations are many,
many times faster in native code than in any "compiled" manifestation of
VBA code
- VB has (or had) a few very powerful capabilities that VBA does (or did)
not have)

But for most DB applications these are not needed and the slickness of
Access as a front end far outweighs any programming advantage VB might
have.

(Of course there are the misinformed persons who believe that VB has some
inherent advantage over Access as a "real" programming language. Sigh!)

--
Lyle
(for e-mail refer to http://ffdba.com/contacts.htm)
Nov 12 '05 #9

P: n/a
http://www.barsnet.com/
http://www.thermeon.com/
http://www.caribbean-connexion.com/software/ - and this is 'serious'
software too, in C++!
"Robert" <pr**********@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:10*************@corp.supernews.com...

"Mike MacSween" <mi***********************@btinternet.com> wrote in message news:40**********************@news.aaisp.net.uk...
That sounds like a database project to me. So use a database development
system. Like Access.

What makes you think it's 'complex'? IMHO the complexity of a system can't be measured until you've done a great deal of work in analysis. And if
it is
complex the chances are that the complexity is in the data structures -
tables and how they relate to each other. In which case a database
development system is what you need. Like Access.

Of course if it's very very complex then you probably need to program it
properly. In which case assembler is the obvious answer.<g>

As has been pointed out, won't this just be standard vertical market
software that somebody has already written?

Yours, Mike MacSween

"Robert" <pr**********@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:10*************@corp.supernews.com...
Would you use Access to create a car rental reservation system? I would think that the complexity of such a system would be better suited to a
procedural language like Visual Basic or C++. Your thoughts, please.

Robert



A previous poster evidently hasn't found any!
Robert

Nov 12 '05 #10

P: n/a
rkc

"Lyle Fairfield" <Mi************@Invalid.Com> wrote in message
news:Xn*******************@130.133.1.17...
"Robert" <pr**********@yahoo.com> wrote in news:102vtdna4rn3d95
@corp.supernews.com:
Then why does anyone use Visual Basic?


Asking that here is like asking Canadians why they elected George Bush.


I hear you're all voting for Conan O'Brien this year.
Nov 12 '05 #11

P: n/a
I'll pass it along. Thanks.
Robert

"Mike MacSween" <mi***********************@btinternet.com> wrote in message
news:40**********************@news.aaisp.net.uk...
http://www.barsnet.com/
http://www.thermeon.com/
http://www.caribbean-connexion.com/software/ - and this is 'serious'
software too, in C++!
"Robert" <pr**********@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:10*************@corp.supernews.com...

"Mike MacSween" <mi***********************@btinternet.com> wrote in

message
news:40**********************@news.aaisp.net.uk...
That sounds like a database project to me. So use a database development system. Like Access.

What makes you think it's 'complex'? IMHO the complexity of a system can't be measured until you've done a great deal of work in analysis. And if it
is
complex the chances are that the complexity is in the data structures - tables and how they relate to each other. In which case a database
development system is what you need. Like Access.

Of course if it's very very complex then you probably need to program it properly. In which case assembler is the obvious answer.<g>

As has been pointed out, won't this just be standard vertical market
software that somebody has already written?

Yours, Mike MacSween

"Robert" <pr**********@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:10*************@corp.supernews.com...
> Would you use Access to create a car rental reservation system? I

would > think that the complexity of such a system would be better suited to a > procedural language like Visual Basic or C++. Your thoughts, please. >
> Robert
>
>


A previous poster evidently hasn't found any!
Robert


Nov 12 '05 #12

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