472,353 Members | 2,174 Online
Bytes | Software Development & Data Engineering Community
+ Post

Home Posts Topics Members FAQ

Join Bytes to post your question to a community of 472,353 software developers and data experts.

Future of MS Access......

I'm curious if anyone has any insights into what Microsoft has in
store for ACCESS in current or future releases? I'm currently working
on Access 2000 and haven't seen the newer versions. I'm curious if
Microsoft will keep VBA or move ACCESS over to VB.NET or C#?

Thanks.
Nov 12 '05 #1
7 2421
I have no official knowledge, but it's clear to me that Microsoft intends to
migrate everything to the .NET framework eventually. I don't see how they'll
get there with Access any sooner than 5 about years, though.

Personally, I'm anxiously waiting for the day the benefits of Access and of
the .NET framework are brought together. Currently, they each have compelling
benefits you can't get from the other.

On 9 Feb 2004 21:23:19 -0800, cy********@earthlink.net (Ronnie) wrote:
I'm curious if anyone has any insights into what Microsoft has in
store for ACCESS in current or future releases? I'm currently working
on Access 2000 and haven't seen the newer versions. I'm curious if
Microsoft will keep VBA or move ACCESS over to VB.NET or C#?

Thanks.


Nov 12 '05 #2
I can now get by with VBA. However, I know absolutely nothing about C or C++
or Java or Javascript, so I hope they won't migrate to anything that's not,
however remotely, based on BASIC.

Herbert

"Ronnie" <cy********@earthlink.net> gl
news:51**************************@posting.google.c om...
I'm curious if anyone has any insights into what Microsoft has in
store for ACCESS in current or future releases? I'm currently working
on Access 2000 and haven't seen the newer versions. I'm curious if
Microsoft will keep VBA or move ACCESS over to VB.NET or C#?

Thanks.


Nov 12 '05 #3

"Herbert Chan" <He*****@Chan.com> wrote in message
news:c0*************@ID-220748.news.uni-berlin.de...
I can now get by with VBA. However, I know absolutely nothing about C or C++ or Java or Javascript, so I hope they won't migrate to anything that's not, however remotely, based on BASIC.

Herbert


*ha ha ha
*good chan
*i dig your problem totally
Nov 12 '05 #4
On Tue, 10 Feb 2004 14:57:39 +0800, "Herbert Chan" <He*****@Chan.com> wrote:
I can now get by with VBA. However, I know absolutely nothing about C or C++
or Java or Javascript, so I hope they won't migrate to anything that's not,
however remotely, based on BASIC.

Herbert

"Ronnie" <cy********@earthlink.net> gl
news:51**************************@posting.google. com...
I'm curious if anyone has any insights into what Microsoft has in
store for ACCESS in current or future releases? I'm currently working
on Access 2000 and haven't seen the newer versions. I'm curious if
Microsoft will keep VBA or move ACCESS over to VB.NET or C#?

Thanks.


If they follow the same path they've been following, and if they make Access
use the .NET framework, the default scripting language should be VB.NET, but
the .NET framework lets you use any of the .NET languages with anything. They
just might only support only VB.NET with the built-in IDE, though.
Nov 12 '05 #5
Well, there is absolute millions and millions of spreadsheets on the planet
earth. They all use VBA.

And, it should be known that word macros have been for a very long time also
VBA.

So, in effect, ms has to figure out a way to make all this stuff work. I
mean, if a company is going to dump Excel, who says they are going to use
Excel next time around?

MS is that not that stupid. They HAVE to provide some VBA ability. There is
NO way around this problem. I rest easy at night on this issue. If they make
VBA work for Word and Excel...then ms-access comes along for the ride also.

I have more then once mentioned here that MS has the best track
record in the industry when it comes to software updates and
long term use.

Apple computer has forced their whole user community
MORE THAN ONCE to throw out ALL of their software. None of the original
apple mac programs from the 1980's worked with the new MAC that came out in
the early 90's. I sure you remember the first Mac Paint programs!
However, you can't run those old programs. All those users were left high
and dry!

Apple did this again recently with the new OS X, and again
forced out tons and tons of software.

With windows, we can still run old software from the 1980's. MS has never
forced a upgrade here by design. I have clients in town running old DOS
FoxPro code from the 1980's on brand new win XP pc's. Ms-access is
celebrating its 11 anniversary right now (or is it now 12?). Fact is,
you can still run and use the ORIGINAL ms-access version 1.0 (that
is from windows 3.1, 16 bit environment) on brand new 32 bit pc windows
box today. (MS had to do a LOT OF work to make old windows 3.1 code still
function. Just dealing with 16 bit libraries vs 32 bit was a huge
challenge). Fact is that MS had the money to spend on compatibility and
they did, where companies like Apple is make you fork out the money for
new versions. As a result, with MS your software investment has been
protected better then anyone else in the last 20 years.

There is not one company, I repeat NOT ONE company that comes close to the
track record of MS. In fact, one the reasons why MS is so successful is
because IBM, Apple, Atari etc, and even SUN can not even come close the
compatibility that windows has maintained over the years. MS likes you
as a customer, and thus having compatibility keeps you!

I was talking to some one the other day, and they say they are going to
upgrade from VB to .net? I asked why? If you want to develop with very OLD
very of VB5, you still can.

Fact is, from a compatibility point of view, there is not a vendor in the
industry that even comes remotely close to the continues compatibility
Microsoft has offered over the last 20 years.

You can actually go a web site and download the Original version of
visi calc and run it on your pc today (that download is less then 32k
which is smaller then a web page with graphics!). Imagine that, a
whole spread sheet that fits easily in 32k of ram! Note that this
is a program for the original dos based IBM pc from 1981. You
can STILL RUN this software on your new pc.

So, even if ms-access was being dropped, you likely could use it for
the next 20 years!

However, we got a new version access 2003 a few months ago. They are
now hard at work on the next version.

Since MS is so eager to win market share, and win customers, then why
on earth would they dump the most popular database program in the
world? You mean they want to chase customers away back to Linux and
apple after all this work to win those customers? really, do you
think the company is that stupid?

I have little doubt we will see new versions of ms-access for the next
10, or 20 years.

I have little doubt we will be able to keep the VBA. The whole thing
likely will be wrapped as a whole .net "vba" object...but they do have to
provide some set of stairs here, and that means we will be able to
use VBA. MS cannot risk loosing so many customers. They are one
of the best companies in the world at keeping customers.

--
Albert D. Kallal (Microsoft Access MVP)
Edmonton, Alberta Canada
pl******************@msn.com
http://www.attcanada.net/~kallal.msn


Nov 12 '05 #6
Ken Getz, in his editorial in this months Advisor, says it's time for Access
developers to start looking into the .Net platform ... whether that means
VBA is at risk, I don't know, but I'm with Albert on this one - there's
waaaaay too much stuff out there that's based on VBA for MS to just abandon
it.

--
Scott McDaniel
CS Computer Software
Visual Basic - Access - Sql Server - ASP

"Smash forehead on keyboard to continue ... "
"Ronnie" <cy********@earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:51**************************@posting.google.c om...
I'm curious if anyone has any insights into what Microsoft has in
store for ACCESS in current or future releases? I'm currently working
on Access 2000 and haven't seen the newer versions. I'm curious if
Microsoft will keep VBA or move ACCESS over to VB.NET or C#?

Thanks.

Nov 12 '05 #7
On Tue, 10 Feb 2004 08:20:15 GMT, "Albert D. Kallal"
<pl********************@msn.com> wrote:

<snip>
I have little doubt we will be able to keep the VBA. The whole thing
likely will be wrapped as a whole .net "vba" object...but they do have to
provide some set of stairs here, and that means we will be able to
use VBA. MS cannot risk loosing so many customers. They are one
of the best companies in the world at keeping customers.


I would look at Microsoft's past history in upgrading from Excel XLM
macros to VBA macros. Excel 97 can run most XLM macros, but you can't
record new ones.

Microsoft has, over time, moved their customer base to new languages.
I cut my teeth on GW Basic, went to QuickBasic, and then to Visual
Basic. Even though you still can run QB programs, QB programs will
not compile in VB. Over time, Microsoft did move their customer base
to a new development platform.

Finally, the replacement "developer" edition of Access, for version
2003, includes VB.Net. I think we should get the hint (or .hint),
that eventually, Access developers will be using VB.Net instad of VBA.
But, that may not be for years, and I just may be retired by then :).

Steven R. Zuch
Cogent Management Inc.


Nov 12 '05 #8

This thread has been closed and replies have been disabled. Please start a new discussion.

Similar topics

47
by: David Eng | last post by:
> For many years now enterprise business application development has > been the core area for the use of C++. > Today a significant share to this...
18
by: Ghost Dog | last post by:
Where's the future of Microsoft Access? 1) Access + Vba 2) Access + .NET 3) Access + (Vba OR .NET) 4) The Death And the JET Engine...
5
by: PetitTrot | last post by:
Sorry if this question is "classic" I am interested know status of MS Access. What is future of MS Access? Do you know a site web with chart of...
13
by: Randy Harris | last post by:
Several years ago I became involved in a major Access development project. At the time, A2K was very new and the books were rather strongly...
2
by: FilterXG | last post by:
I've noticed that over the last year my MS Office programming has become more and more vb.net based. At this point more than half of my Excel and...
33
by: Uwe Range | last post by:
Hi to all! A customer of mine told me some days ago that her IT-people told her ACCESS would not be such a good idea for continuing with our...
64
by: John | last post by:
Hi What future does access have after the release of vs 2005/sql 2005? MS doesn't seem to have done anything major with access lately and...
13
by: Nick Coe \(UK\) | last post by:
I'm seriously considering setting up the future development of AccHelp as an open source project on sourceforge. Why? I just don't have the time...
9
by: Lyle Fairfield | last post by:
It's confusing. Many people here and elsewhere make many different predictions: There's an introduction mentioning some aspects of this at...
2
by: =?Utf-8?B?Sm9ubnk=?= | last post by:
I have an ASP.NET 2.0 C# web application that is contacting an Exchange server using WEBDAV. It allows the users to look up appointments for a...
1
by: Kemmylinns12 | last post by:
Blockchain technology has emerged as a transformative force in the business world, offering unprecedented opportunities for innovation and...
0
by: Naresh1 | last post by:
What is WebLogic Admin Training? WebLogic Admin Training is a specialized program designed to equip individuals with the skills and knowledge...
0
jalbright99669
by: jalbright99669 | last post by:
Am having a bit of a time with URL Rewrite. I need to incorporate http to https redirect with a reverse proxy. I have the URL Rewrite rules made...
0
by: antdb | last post by:
Ⅰ. Advantage of AntDB: hyper-convergence + streaming processing engine In the overall architecture, a new "hyper-convergence" concept was...
2
by: Matthew3360 | last post by:
Hi, I have a python app that i want to be able to get variables from a php page on my webserver. My python app is on my computer. How would I make it...
0
by: AndyPSV | last post by:
HOW CAN I CREATE AN AI with an .executable file that would suck all files in the folder and on my computerHOW CAN I CREATE AN AI with an .executable...
0
by: Matthew3360 | last post by:
Hi, I have been trying to connect to a local host using php curl. But I am finding it hard to do this. I am doing the curl get request from my web...
0
BLUEPANDA
by: BLUEPANDA | last post by:
At BluePanda Dev, we're passionate about building high-quality software and sharing our knowledge with the community. That's why we've created a SaaS...
0
by: Rahul1995seven | last post by:
Introduction: In the realm of programming languages, Python has emerged as a powerhouse. With its simplicity, versatility, and robustness, Python...

By using Bytes.com and it's services, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

To disable or enable advertisements and analytics tracking please visit the manage ads & tracking page.