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General Back End Stability question

P: n/a
This is a general question about back ends.

Using in the scenario of a single user machine or *possibly* 2 networked
machines. Therefore using SQL Server is not really an option.

I need to write a database that keeps track of someone's sales (eg:
jewellery shop). There would be tables with around 20000 records that would
keep track of the stock items (wouldn't change much). The bulk of the work
is based on sales made which of course would vary. It's probably fair to
say that in any one year, there would say 40000 transactions (sales).

If I wrote the front end in VS.net VB, would Access be stable enough for a
back end? If not, what are other options that I should be considering?

TIA
Michelle

PS: If I also carrying out compacting on a regular basis, would this help?
Is there such a thing as 'compact and repairing' too often?

Nov 12 '05 #1
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9 Replies


P: n/a
Whether stability is good enough depends on your stability requirements.
Based on what you've said, the database will always be off-line each night,
and could be fully backed up, and a repair/compact run. Given that, the very
worst that could happen in a crash or corruption is the loss of a day's work.
You could even reduce that risk further by backing up at lunch. In this
situation, what is the cost of that loss?

Also, in most cases back-end data corruption is fairly rare, though it
certainly does happen. When it does happen, the data is usually recoverable,
possibly minus one or 2 rows that can then be re-entered or recovered from
another back-up. I've only had about 2 unrecoverable back-end corruptions in
about 13 years of Access work, and one of those was my fault (make sure your
procedures are solid and resistant to human error).

On Wed, 28 Jan 2004 08:18:22 +1000, "-Michelle-" <mi********@yahoo.com> wrote:
This is a general question about back ends.

Using in the scenario of a single user machine or *possibly* 2 networked
machines. Therefore using SQL Server is not really an option.

I need to write a database that keeps track of someone's sales (eg:
jewellery shop). There would be tables with around 20000 records that would
keep track of the stock items (wouldn't change much). The bulk of the work
is based on sales made which of course would vary. It's probably fair to
say that in any one year, there would say 40000 transactions (sales).

If I wrote the front end in VS.net VB, would Access be stable enough for a
back end? If not, what are other options that I should be considering?

TIA
Michelle

PS: If I also carrying out compacting on a regular basis, would this help?
Is there such a thing as 'compact and repairing' too often?


Nov 12 '05 #2

P: n/a
Steve Jorgensen <no****@nospam.nospam> wrote in
news:op********************************@4ax.com:
Also, in most cases back-end data corruption is fairly rare,
though it certainly does happen. When it does happen, the data is
usually recoverable, possibly minus one or 2 rows that can then be
re-entered or recovered from another back-up. I've only had about
2 unrecoverable back-end corruptions in about 13 years of Access
work, and one of those was my fault (make sure your procedures are
solid and resistant to human error).


Actually, most instances of reported corruption don't lose any data
at all, because the there's not actually anything corrupt, it's just
a flag that isn't set right.

Indeed, I've seen only a handful of cases of actual data loss in my
nearly 10 years of full-time Access programming.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.bway.net/~dfenton
dfenton at bway dot net http://www.bway.net/~dfassoc
Nov 12 '05 #3

P: n/a
On Tue, 27 Jan 2004 23:47:11 GMT, "David W. Fenton"
<dX********@bway.net.invalid> wrote:
Steve Jorgensen <no****@nospam.nospam> wrote in
news:op********************************@4ax.com :
Also, in most cases back-end data corruption is fairly rare,
though it certainly does happen. When it does happen, the data is
usually recoverable, possibly minus one or 2 rows that can then be
re-entered or recovered from another back-up. I've only had about
2 unrecoverable back-end corruptions in about 13 years of Access
work, and one of those was my fault (make sure your procedures are
solid and resistant to human error).


Actually, most instances of reported corruption don't lose any data
at all, because the there's not actually anything corrupt, it's just
a flag that isn't set right.


Yes, that is what I was trying to imply, though I certainly have experienced
the loss of a row or 2 once in a great while. The repair process also tells
you when it loses rows, so you know when this has happened and can take
appropriate measures to recover properly afterward.
Nov 12 '05 #4

P: n/a
This message is a forgery.

On Wed, 28 Jan 2004 09:56:38 +0100, Salad <oi*@vinegar.com> wrote:

Your email name "milky swirl" causes a twinge in my loins.

-Michelle- wrote:
This is a general question about back ends.

Using in the scenario of a single user machine or *possibly* 2 networked
machines. Therefore using SQL Server is not really an option.

I need to write a database that keeps track of someone's sales (eg:
jewellery shop). There would be tables with around 20000 records that would
keep track of the stock items (wouldn't change much). The bulk of the work
is based on sales made which of course would vary. It's probably fair to
say that in any one year, there would say 40000 transactions (sales).

If I wrote the front end in VS.net VB, would Access be stable enough for a
back end? If not, what are other options that I should be considering?

TIA
Michelle

PS: If I also carrying out compacting on a regular basis, would this help?
Is there such a thing as 'compact and repairing' too often?







Nov 12 '05 #5

P: n/a
I take offense to your comments. I have posted questions on here before and
I am always thankful for the answers that I get.

I also cannot be held responsible what happens to your loins when reading my
email address.

Michelle
"Steve Jorgensen" <no****@nospam.nospam> wrote in message
news:or********************************@4ax.com...
This message is a forgery.

On Wed, 28 Jan 2004 09:56:38 +0100, Salad <oi*@vinegar.com> wrote:

Your email name "milky swirl" causes a twinge in my loins.

-Michelle- wrote:
This is a general question about back ends.

Using in the scenario of a single user machine or *possibly* 2 networked machines. Therefore using SQL Server is not really an option.

I need to write a database that keeps track of someone's sales (eg:
jewellery shop). There would be tables with around 20000 records that would keep track of the stock items (wouldn't change much). The bulk of the work is based on sales made which of course would vary. It's probably fair to say that in any one year, there would say 40000 transactions (sales).

If I wrote the front end in VS.net VB, would Access be stable enough for a back end? If not, what are other options that I should be considering?

TIA
Michelle

PS: If I also carrying out compacting on a regular basis, would this help? Is there such a thing as 'compact and repairing' too often?






Nov 12 '05 #6

P: n/a
Presumably, you received my reply before the original message. I was pointing
out that the offensive message was not, in fact posted by the person who is
know here by the name of salad, but by an imposter posting through an
anonymous remailer.

On Wed, 28 Jan 2004 19:10:24 +1000, "-Michelle-" <mi********@yahoo.com> wrote:
I take offense to your comments. I have posted questions on here before and
I am always thankful for the answers that I get.

I also cannot be held responsible what happens to your loins when reading my
email address.

Michelle
"Steve Jorgensen" <no****@nospam.nospam> wrote in message
news:or********************************@4ax.com.. .
This message is a forgery.

On Wed, 28 Jan 2004 09:56:38 +0100, Salad <oi*@vinegar.com> wrote:
>
>Your email name "milky swirl" causes a twinge in my loins.
>
>
>
>-Michelle- wrote:
>
>> This is a general question about back ends.
>>
>> Using in the scenario of a single user machine or *possibly* 2networked >> machines. Therefore using SQL Server is not really an option.
>>
>> I need to write a database that keeps track of someone's sales (eg:
>> jewellery shop). There would be tables with around 20000 records thatwould >> keep track of the stock items (wouldn't change much). The bulk of thework >> is based on sales made which of course would vary. It's probably fairto >> say that in any one year, there would say 40000 transactions (sales).
>>
>> If I wrote the front end in VS.net VB, would Access be stable enoughfor a >> back end? If not, what are other options that I should be considering?
>>
>> TIA
>> Michelle
>>
>> PS: If I also carrying out compacting on a regular basis, would thishelp? >> Is there such a thing as 'compact and repairing' too often?
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>


Nov 12 '05 #7

P: n/a
Thanks for the explanation. I actually never received the original message.

"Steve Jorgensen" <no****@nospam.nospam> wrote in message
news:7l********************************@4ax.com...
Presumably, you received my reply before the original message. I was pointing out that the offensive message was not, in fact posted by the person who is know here by the name of salad, but by an imposter posting through an
anonymous remailer.

On Wed, 28 Jan 2004 19:10:24 +1000, "-Michelle-" <mi********@yahoo.com> wrote:
I take offense to your comments. I have posted questions on here before andI am always thankful for the answers that I get.

I also cannot be held responsible what happens to your loins when reading myemail address.

Michelle
"Steve Jorgensen" <no****@nospam.nospam> wrote in message
news:or********************************@4ax.com.. .
This message is a forgery.

On Wed, 28 Jan 2004 09:56:38 +0100, Salad <oi*@vinegar.com> wrote:

>
>Your email name "milky swirl" causes a twinge in my loins.
>
>
>
>-Michelle- wrote:
>
>> This is a general question about back ends.
>>
>> Using in the scenario of a single user machine or *possibly* 2

networked
>> machines. Therefore using SQL Server is not really an option.
>>
>> I need to write a database that keeps track of someone's sales (eg:
>> jewellery shop). There would be tables with around 20000 records that
would
>> keep track of the stock items (wouldn't change much). The bulk of
thework
>> is based on sales made which of course would vary. It's probably
fairto
>> say that in any one year, there would say 40000 transactions

(sales). >>
>> If I wrote the front end in VS.net VB, would Access be stable enough

for a
>> back end? If not, what are other options that I should be considering? >>
>> TIA
>> Michelle
>>
>> PS: If I also carrying out compacting on a regular basis, would this

help?
>> Is there such a thing as 'compact and repairing' too often?
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>

Nov 12 '05 #8

P: n/a
Another fake via an anonymous remailer, of course.

On 28 Jan 2004 14:31:17 -0000, An****************@See.Comment.Header
(MacDermott) wrote:
Oh come on! Michelle, you obviously are aware of the allusions you make
with "milky swirl"?
-Michelle- wrote:
I take offense to your comments. I have posted questions on here before and
I am always thankful for the answers that I get.

I also cannot be held responsible what happens to your loins when reading my
email address.

Michelle
"Steve Jorgensen" <no****@nospam.nospam> wrote in message
news:or********************************@4ax.com...
This message is a forgery.

On Wed, 28 Jan 2004 09:56:38 +0100, Salad <oi*@vinegar.com> wrote:

>
>Your email name "milky swirl" causes a twinge in my loins.
>
>
>
>-Michelle- wrote:
>
>> This is a general question about back ends.
>>
>> Using in the scenario of a single user machine or *possibly* 2

networked
>> machines. Therefore using SQL Server is not really an option.
>>
>> I need to write a database that keeps track of someone's sales (eg:
>> jewellery shop). There would be tables with around 20000 records that

would
>> keep track of the stock items (wouldn't change much). The bulk of the

work
>> is based on sales made which of course would vary. It's probably fair

to
>> say that in any one year, there would say 40000 transactions (sales).
>>
>> If I wrote the front end in VS.net VB, would Access be stable enough

for a
>> back end? If not, what are other options that I should be considering?
>>
>> TIA
>> Michelle
>>
>> PS: If I also carrying out compacting on a regular basis, would this

help?
>> Is there such a thing as 'compact and repairing' too often?
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>



Nov 12 '05 #9

P: n/a
An****************@See.Comment.Header (NB) wrote:
Comments: This message did not originate from the above address.
It was remailed by two or more anonymous mail services.


Please ignore this posting.

Tony
--
Tony Toews, Microsoft Access MVP
Please respond only in the newsgroups so that others can
read the entire thread of messages.
Microsoft Access Links, Hints, Tips & Accounting Systems at
http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm
Nov 12 '05 #10

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