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Adding a password protected field for a scanned signature

P: n/a
I have made a purchase requistion which I have been asked to put password
protected copy of requestors signature.
I am thinking that each signature will have to be scanned as a picture and
linked by some sort of password .

I wanted to tell them just have everybody sign the documents when it comes
out of the printer.
I was shown that it was done on another form. It was not Access and I was
not allowed to take the form apart.

Thanks,
Kelly
Nov 12 '05 #1
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4 Replies


P: n/a
On Mon, 26 Jan 2004 01:06:25 -0600, "Kelly Bowles" <ke*********@hotmail.com>
wrote:
I have made a purchase requistion which I have been asked to put password
protected copy of requestors signature.
I am thinking that each signature will have to be scanned as a picture and
linked by some sort of password .

I wanted to tell them just have everybody sign the documents when it comes
out of the printer.
I was shown that it was done on another form. It was not Access and I was
not allowed to take the form apart.

Thanks,
Kelly


First of all, you need to find out how strong the security requirements are
for protecting the signature. If they're sufficiently high, then Access
cannot do the job. If it is sufficient to simply make it unlikely that the
average employee would figure out how to access the signatures, then Access is
probably OK.

So given that Access is adequate, you want to first make sure you have a
properly secured database meaning that the database itself is owned by you,
and not by the Admin user, and all permissions for the Admin user have been
removed, etc. If you don't know all about this, get an Access book that
covers it, and make sure you've done all the steps, and tested that they were
done properly.

Next, you want to have the table containing the signature images and passwords
secured so that only you have access to it, then create a query also owned by
you and with read-only permissions for others, and set the Owner Permissions
property which allows the query to run with your permissions even when run by
someone else. For the query criteria, you want to restrict the output to rows
where the password matches a control on a form into which the user will have
entered the password (e.g. Forms!frmSecurity!txtPassword). The form should
use the Password input mask, so other users can't read the password on the
screen.
Nov 12 '05 #2

P: n/a
I have ordered Real World Microsoft Access Database Protection and Security
by Garry Robinson. Any other recommendations or suggestions are greatly
appreciated.

Thanks
Kelly
"Steve Jorgensen" <no****@nospam.nospam> wrote in message
news:4v********************************@4ax.com...
On Mon, 26 Jan 2004 01:06:25 -0600, "Kelly Bowles" <ke*********@hotmail.com> wrote:
I have made a purchase requistion which I have been asked to put password
protected copy of requestors signature.
I am thinking that each signature will have to be scanned as a picture andlinked by some sort of password .

I wanted to tell them just have everybody sign the documents when it comesout of the printer.
I was shown that it was done on another form. It was not Access and I was
not allowed to take the form apart.

Thanks,
Kelly

First of all, you need to find out how strong the security requirements

are for protecting the signature. If they're sufficiently high, then Access
cannot do the job. If it is sufficient to simply make it unlikely that the average employee would figure out how to access the signatures, then Access is probably OK.

So given that Access is adequate, you want to first make sure you have a
properly secured database meaning that the database itself is owned by you, and not by the Admin user, and all permissions for the Admin user have been removed, etc. If you don't know all about this, get an Access book that
covers it, and make sure you've done all the steps, and tested that they were done properly.

Next, you want to have the table containing the signature images and passwords secured so that only you have access to it, then create a query also owned by you and with read-only permissions for others, and set the Owner Permissions property which allows the query to run with your permissions even when run by someone else. For the query criteria, you want to restrict the output to rows where the password matches a control on a form into which the user will have entered the password (e.g. Forms!frmSecurity!txtPassword). The form should use the Password input mask, so other users can't read the password on the
screen.


Nov 12 '05 #3

P: n/a
Ah, I didn't mean you necessarily needed a single book just on Access
Security, just that you needed a reputable book on Access with a decent
chapter on the subject if you don't already have one.

On Mon, 26 Jan 2004 11:26:07 -0600, "Kelly Bowles" <ke******@hotmail.com>
wrote:
I have ordered Real World Microsoft Access Database Protection and Security
by Garry Robinson. Any other recommendations or suggestions are greatly
appreciated.

Thanks
Kelly
"Steve Jorgensen" <no****@nospam.nospam> wrote in message
news:4v********************************@4ax.com.. .
On Mon, 26 Jan 2004 01:06:25 -0600, "Kelly Bowles"

<ke*********@hotmail.com>
wrote:
>I have made a purchase requistion which I have been asked to put password
>protected copy of requestors signature.
>I am thinking that each signature will have to be scanned as a pictureand >linked by some sort of password .
>
>I wanted to tell them just have everybody sign the documents when itcomes >out of the printer.
>I was shown that it was done on another form. It was not Access and I was
>not allowed to take the form apart.
>
>Thanks,
>Kelly
>


First of all, you need to find out how strong the security requirements

are
for protecting the signature. If they're sufficiently high, then Access
cannot do the job. If it is sufficient to simply make it unlikely that

the
average employee would figure out how to access the signatures, then

Access is
probably OK.

So given that Access is adequate, you want to first make sure you have a
properly secured database meaning that the database itself is owned by

you,
and not by the Admin user, and all permissions for the Admin user have

been
removed, etc. If you don't know all about this, get an Access book that
covers it, and make sure you've done all the steps, and tested that they

were
done properly.

Next, you want to have the table containing the signature images and

passwords
secured so that only you have access to it, then create a query also owned

by
you and with read-only permissions for others, and set the Owner

Permissions
property which allows the query to run with your permissions even when run

by
someone else. For the query criteria, you want to restrict the output to

rows
where the password matches a control on a form into which the user will

have
entered the password (e.g. Forms!frmSecurity!txtPassword). The form

should
use the Password input mask, so other users can't read the password on the
screen.



Nov 12 '05 #4

P: n/a
A "more than decent" chapter on Access security, in fact, the only
"authority" on the subject that I recommend is the Microsoft Access Security
FAQ which is described at
http://support.microsoft.com/default...NoWebContent=1,
which also includes the address from which it can be downloaded.

Larry Linson
Microsoft Access MVP

"Steve Jorgensen" <no****@nospam.nospam> wrote in message
news:78********************************@4ax.com...
Ah, I didn't mean you necessarily needed a single book just on Access
Security, just that you needed a reputable book on Access with a decent
chapter on the subject if you don't already have one.

On Mon, 26 Jan 2004 11:26:07 -0600, "Kelly Bowles" <ke******@hotmail.com>
wrote:
I have ordered Real World Microsoft Access Database Protection and Securityby Garry Robinson. Any other recommendations or suggestions are greatly
appreciated.

Thanks
Kelly
"Steve Jorgensen" <no****@nospam.nospam> wrote in message
news:4v********************************@4ax.com.. .
On Mon, 26 Jan 2004 01:06:25 -0600, "Kelly Bowles"

<ke*********@hotmail.com>
wrote:

>I have made a purchase requistion which I have been asked to put password >protected copy of requestors signature.
>I am thinking that each signature will have to be scanned as a picture

and
>linked by some sort of password .
>
>I wanted to tell them just have everybody sign the documents when it

comes
>out of the printer.
>I was shown that it was done on another form. It was not Access and I was >not allowed to take the form apart.
>
>Thanks,
>Kelly
>

First of all, you need to find out how strong the security requirements

are
for protecting the signature. If they're sufficiently high, then Access cannot do the job. If it is sufficient to simply make it unlikely that

the
average employee would figure out how to access the signatures, then

Access is
probably OK.

So given that Access is adequate, you want to first make sure you have a properly secured database meaning that the database itself is owned by

you,
and not by the Admin user, and all permissions for the Admin user have

been
removed, etc. If you don't know all about this, get an Access book that covers it, and make sure you've done all the steps, and tested that they
were
done properly.

Next, you want to have the table containing the signature images and

passwords
secured so that only you have access to it, then create a query also
ownedby
you and with read-only permissions for others, and set the Owner

Permissions
property which allows the query to run with your permissions even when
runby
someone else. For the query criteria, you want to restrict the output
torows
where the password matches a control on a form into which the user will

have
entered the password (e.g. Forms!frmSecurity!txtPassword). The form

should
use the Password input mask, so other users can't read the password on

the screen.


Nov 12 '05 #5

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.