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Table field increments - don't want it to.

P: n/a
I never noticed this myself. Had a user bring this up when then were
updating a field that is a NUMBER, LONG INTEGER field.

In successive rows, they entered into.

3 (typed in row 1)
4 (typed in row 2)
5 (showed up when arrowed down to next row...........but should of been left
blank)

How do we turn this off?

THANKS
Nov 12 '05 #1
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12 Replies

P: n/a
Jim Fox wrote:
I never noticed this myself. Had a user bring this up when then were
updating a field that is a NUMBER, LONG INTEGER field.

In successive rows, they entered into.

3 (typed in row 1)
4 (typed in row 2)
5 (showed up when arrowed down to next row...........but should of been left
blank)

How do we turn this off?

THANKS


It's odd that it did it in row3 but not in row2.

Do you have an OnCurrent or OnInsert event that increments the next number?

Do you have a DefaultValue for the field?

Was the field blank for both row1 and row2?

Is the number an autonumber field?

Nov 12 '05 #2

P: n/a
I went directly into the table and tried this and it does it there too. So
there is no ONCURRENT, etc in there.

The default value for the field is 0 and those fields were all blank when
the data was entered.

Field is a NUMBER, LONG INTEGER.
"Salad" <oi*@vinegar.com> wrote in message
news:3F***************@vinegar.com...
Jim Fox wrote:
I never noticed this myself. Had a user bring this up when then were
updating a field that is a NUMBER, LONG INTEGER field.

In successive rows, they entered into.

3 (typed in row 1)
4 (typed in row 2)
5 (showed up when arrowed down to next row...........but should of been left blank)

How do we turn this off?

THANKS
It's odd that it did it in row3 but not in row2.

Do you have an OnCurrent or OnInsert event that increments the next

number?
Do you have a DefaultValue for the field?

Was the field blank for both row1 and row2?

Is the number an autonumber field?

Nov 12 '05 #3

P: n/a
"Jim Fox" <ji****@chartermi.net> wrote in message
news:vv************@corp.supernews.com...
I went directly into the table and tried this and it does it there too. So there is no ONCURRENT, etc in there.

The default value for the field is 0 and those fields were all blank when
the data was entered.

Field is a NUMBER, LONG INTEGER.


This is another MS mis-feature and there is no way to turn it off. One
really shouldn't do data entry directly into the table anyway. If you use
a form the issue goes away.
--
I don't check the Email account attached
to this message. Send instead to...
RBrandt at Hunter dot com
Nov 12 '05 #4

P: n/a
I just posted a rant about this, myself. Microsoft thinks software should
think for us now, so if you ver type 2 numbers in sequence, either vertically
or horizontally, Access thinks is hould help you out by entering the next
value for you as well. There does not seem to be any way to turn this feature
off.

The good news is it looks as if forms are not affected (unless in datasheet
view), so doing data entry through a form seems to be a good solution.

On Tue, 6 Jan 2004 11:22:28 -0500, "Jim Fox" <ji****@chartermi.net> wrote:
I never noticed this myself. Had a user bring this up when then were
updating a field that is a NUMBER, LONG INTEGER field.

In successive rows, they entered into.

3 (typed in row 1)
4 (typed in row 2)
5 (showed up when arrowed down to next row...........but should of been left
blank)

How do we turn this off?

THANKS


Nov 12 '05 #5

P: n/a
DFS

"Jim Fox" <ji****@chartermi.net> wrote in message
news:vv***********@corp.supernews.com...
I never noticed this myself. Had a user bring this up when then were
updating a field that is a NUMBER, LONG INTEGER field.

In successive rows, they entered into.

3 (typed in row 1)
4 (typed in row 2)
5 (showed up when arrowed down to next row...........but should of been left blank)

How do we turn this off?

THANKS

Nov 12 '05 #6

P: n/a
DFS
You can sort of turn it off by moving back up to the previous row, and it
will quit filling in for you on that column.
"Jim Fox" <ji****@chartermi.net> wrote in message
news:vv***********@corp.supernews.com...
I never noticed this myself. Had a user bring this up when then were
updating a field that is a NUMBER, LONG INTEGER field.

In successive rows, they entered into.

3 (typed in row 1)
4 (typed in row 2)
5 (showed up when arrowed down to next row...........but should of been left blank)

How do we turn this off?

THANKS

Nov 12 '05 #7

P: n/a
no****@nospam.nospam (Steve Jorgensen) wrote in
<f8********************************@4ax.com>:
The good news is it looks as if forms are not affected (unless in
datasheet view), so doing data entry through a form seems to be a
good solution.


But won't a form in datasheet view exhibit the behavior? Or perhaps
the form datasheet allows a method to turn it off that the raw
datasheet does not? Perhaps an AutoCorrect setting?

Yes, indeed -- in a datasheet form, you can prohibit this by
turning off AutoCorrect.

I still simply do not understand how the Access team could have
allowed AutoCorrect to be turned on by default for all
fields/controls. It's a *database* application, one where you use
particular controls to *validate* data entry. AutoCorrect is
antithetical to that. At the very least, combo boxes should have
had it turned off by default.

I simply don't understand Microsoft sometimes. Twice in the last
two days I've reconfigured someone's A2K installation to turn off
the adaptive menues, which are so stupid precisely because they
completely subvert the entire purpose of a menu in the first place!

But that's an off-topic rant. . .

--
David W. Fenton http://www.bway.net/~dfenton
dfenton at bway dot net http://www.bway.net/~dfassoc
Nov 12 '05 #8

P: n/a
On Tue, 06 Jan 2004 21:55:44 GMT, dX********@bway.net.invalid (David W.
Fenton) wrote:
no****@nospam.nospam (Steve Jorgensen) wrote in
<f8********************************@4ax.com>:
The good news is it looks as if forms are not affected (unless in
datasheet view), so doing data entry through a form seems to be a
good solution.
But won't a form in datasheet view exhibit the behavior? Or perhaps
the form datasheet allows a method to turn it off that the raw
datasheet does not? Perhaps an AutoCorrect setting?

Yes, indeed -- in a datasheet form, you can prohibit this by
turning off AutoCorrect.


Cool! Good to know. I was assuming that there was no way out of the problem
in any kind of datasheet view.
I still simply do not understand how the Access team could have
allowed AutoCorrect to be turned on by default for all
fields/controls. It's a *database* application, one where you use
particular controls to *validate* data entry. AutoCorrect is
antithetical to that. At the very least, combo boxes should have
had it turned off by default.
I usually use template form to fix that, but I have to make sure to set that
up right away in each new database project I work on .
I simply don't understand Microsoft sometimes. Twice in the last
two days I've reconfigured someone's A2K installation to turn off
the adaptive menues, which are so stupid precisely because they
completely subvert the entire purpose of a menu in the first place!

But that's an off-topic rant. . .


A rant I think many of us share, though.

Funny enough, I think the auto-fill problem is due to Microsoft implementing
an idea from Alan Cooper badly, and the adaptive menu thing could only happen
by ignoring Alan Cooper's good advice.
Nov 12 '05 #9

P: n/a
no****@nospam.nospam (Steve Jorgensen) wrote in
<se********************************@4ax.com>:
On Tue, 06 Jan 2004 21:55:44 GMT, dX********@bway.net.invalid
(David W. Fenton) wrote:
no****@nospam.nospam (Steve Jorgensen) wrote in
<f8********************************@4ax.com>:
The good news is it looks as if forms are not affected (unless
in datasheet view), so doing data entry through a form seems to
be a good solution.


But won't a form in datasheet view exhibit the behavior? Or
perhaps the form datasheet allows a method to turn it off that
the raw datasheet does not? Perhaps an AutoCorrect setting?

Yes, indeed -- in a datasheet form, you can prohibit this by
turning off AutoCorrect.


Cool! Good to know. I was assuming that there was no way out of
the problem in any kind of datasheet view.


MichKa has referred to the wonders of datasheets many times. For
instance, you can open a query in query view and apply event
properties to fields in it. That's something the Access UI does not
expose to you, but that you actually can use in code. Perhaps you
can do the same with a plain datasheet?
I still simply do not understand how the Access team could have
allowed AutoCorrect to be turned on by default for all
fields/controls. It's a *database* application, one where you use
particular controls to *validate* data entry. AutoCorrect is
antithetical to that. At the very least, combo boxes should have
had it turned off by default.


I usually use template form to fix that, but I have to make sure
to set that up right away in each new database project I work on .


I just run code at some point in the development process that sets
it off for everything.
I simply don't understand Microsoft sometimes. Twice in the last
two days I've reconfigured someone's A2K installation to turn off
the adaptive menues, which are so stupid precisely because they
completely subvert the entire purpose of a menu in the first
place!

But that's an off-topic rant. . .


A rant I think many of us share, though.

Funny enough, I think the auto-fill problem is due to Microsoft
implementing an idea from Alan Cooper badly, and the adaptive menu
thing could only happen by ignoring Alan Cooper's good advice.


I still think it comes from spreadsheet thinking, and what Access
needs is interfaces that encourage *less* of that, rather than
more.

The adaptive menu thing makes zero sense to me at all. How could
anyone who's ever used menus ever think that it's helpful fo them
to never be the same twice? How could anyone who's ever used any
program with adaptive menus for, oh, say, 10 seconds, still think
it's a good idea? MS has fixed the single-document-interface fiasco
in recent releases of Office, I understand -- that's one where they
figured out that it was dumb. But they still don't seem to have
figured out that adaptive menus make applications *much* harder to
use, for everyone, novice or expert.

Thank goodness they made *that* one easy to turn off!

--
David W. Fenton http://www.bway.net/~dfenton
dfenton at bway dot net http://www.bway.net/~dfassoc
Nov 12 '05 #10

P: n/a
On Tue, 06 Jan 2004 23:42:59 GMT, dX********@bway.net.invalid (David W.
Fenton) wrote:

....
I still think it comes from spreadsheet thinking, and what Access
needs is interfaces that encourage *less* of that, rather than
more.
Agreed.
The adaptive menu thing makes zero sense to me at all. How could
anyone who's ever used menus ever think that it's helpful fo them
to never be the same twice? How could anyone who's ever used any
program with adaptive menus for, oh, say, 10 seconds, still think
it's a good idea? MS has fixed the single-document-interface fiasco
in recent releases of Office, I understand -- that's one where they
figured out that it was dumb. But they still don't seem to have
figured out that adaptive menus make applications *much* harder to
use, for everyone, novice or expert.

Thank goodness they made *that* one easy to turn off!


It depends what you mean by "easy". As far as I'm concerned, given that it
had any reason to exists at all...

Each app should at least pay follow the Start Menu setting by default, so you
can turn the damn thing off once for the user instead of once for the Start
Menu, and then once again for each application. It also would be nice if they
called this "feature" by the same name in each place so it's easier to find it
to turn it off.
Nov 12 '05 #11

P: n/a
no****@nospam.nospam (Steve Jorgensen) wrote in
<op********************************@4ax.com>:
On Tue, 06 Jan 2004 23:42:59 GMT, dX********@bway.net.invalid
(David W. Fenton) wrote:

The adaptive menu thing makes zero sense to me at all. How could
anyone who's ever used menus ever think that it's helpful fo them
to never be the same twice? How could anyone who's ever used any
program with adaptive menus for, oh, say, 10 seconds, still think
it's a good idea? MS has fixed the single-document-interface
fiasco in recent releases of Office, I understand -- that's one
where they figured out that it was dumb. But they still don't
seem to have figured out that adaptive menus make applications
*much* harder to use, for everyone, novice or expert.

Thank goodness they made *that* one easy to turn off!


It depends what you mean by "easy". As far as I'm concerned,
given that it had any reason to exists at all...

Each app should at least pay follow the Start Menu setting by
default, so you can turn the damn thing off once for the user
instead of once for the Start Menu, and then once again for each
application. It also would be nice if they called this "feature"
by the same name in each place so it's easier to find it to turn
it off.


Agreed on all of that!

Better yet if they'd simply behaved as though they had half the
brains god promised a ham sandwich and simply not have implemented
it at all!

--
David W. Fenton http://www.bway.net/~dfenton
dfenton at bway dot net http://www.bway.net/~dfassoc
Nov 12 '05 #12

P: n/a
On Tue, 06 Jan 2004 23:52:24 GMT, Steve Jorgensen <no****@nospam.nospam>
wrote:
On Tue, 06 Jan 2004 23:42:59 GMT, dX********@bway.net.invalid (David W.
Fenton) wrote:

...
I still think it comes from spreadsheet thinking, and what Access
needs is interfaces that encourage *less* of that, rather than
more.


Agreed.
The adaptive menu thing makes zero sense to me at all. How could
anyone who's ever used menus ever think that it's helpful fo them
to never be the same twice? How could anyone who's ever used any
program with adaptive menus for, oh, say, 10 seconds, still think
it's a good idea? MS has fixed the single-document-interface fiasco
in recent releases of Office, I understand -- that's one where they
figured out that it was dumb. But they still don't seem to have
figured out that adaptive menus make applications *much* harder to
use, for everyone, novice or expert.

Thank goodness they made *that* one easy to turn off!


It depends what you mean by "easy". As far as I'm concerned, given that it
had any reason to exists at all...

Each app should at least pay follow the Start Menu setting by default, so you
can turn the damn thing off once for the user instead of once for the Start
Menu, and then once again for each application. It also would be nice if they
called this "feature" by the same name in each place so it's easier to find it
to turn it off.


Ack - 1/2 editing got the better of me again. I'd better get a news client
with spelling/grammar checking.
Nov 12 '05 #13

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