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delimeter counting: seperating the street from the adresnumber

P: n/a
how can I count the number of blank-seperated word groups in a single field.
The format I receive is aaa (aaa aaa )n(nnn).
aaa can be any number of words, any length. The n(nnn) is not fixed length
either.
The only thing I can think of is a mumps solution: count the number of
space-delemitered words, the last "word" is the streetnumber, the rest is
the street name.

glad for help.
2B Project services
Th. van den Berg RI
Herautstraat 61
8043 AE Zwolle
Nederland
tel : 038-4605619
fax : 038-4605618
www.2b.nl
KvK : 38023654
OB nr : nl66245588b01
Nov 12 '05 #1
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8 Replies


P: n/a
On Mon, 29 Dec 2003 01:14:46 +0100, "Thomas van den Berg"
<va********@2b.nl> wrote:

You could use the Split function, and then check the UBound of the
resulting array.

-Tom.

how can I count the number of blank-seperated word groups in a single field.
The format I receive is aaa (aaa aaa )n(nnn).
aaa can be any number of words, any length. The n(nnn) is not fixed length
either.
The only thing I can think of is a mumps solution: count the number of
space-delemitered words, the last "word" is the streetnumber, the rest is
the street name.

glad for help.
2B Project services
Th. van den Berg RI
Herautstraat 61
8043 AE Zwolle
Nederland
tel : 038-4605619
fax : 038-4605618
www.2b.nl
KvK : 38023654
OB nr : nl66245588b01


Nov 12 '05 #2

P: n/a
Ik heb windows XP Pro, en office XP Pro. Het commando Split zie ik niet.
Kunt u een andere functie naam geven.

hoe ziet het commando er uit
t1:split("straat 15")
t2:???

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Nov 12 '05 #3

P: n/a
On 29 Dec 2003 01:19:44 GMT, Th, van den Berg <ma**@2b.nl> wrote:

Put a bit more effort in it. Split is found in the Help file.
-Tom.

Ik heb windows XP Pro, en office XP Pro. Het commando Split zie ik niet.
Kunt u een andere functie naam geven.

hoe ziet het commando er uit
t1:split("straat 15")
t2:???

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Don't just participate in USENET...get rewarded for it!


Nov 12 '05 #4

P: n/a
My excuses Tom, but I am in this game some time/ I do not ask quicly/
I use the dutch version, i looked through all the help items and I found
"splitsen" which is the dutch equivalent of "split". But it mentions
splitting databases not fields.
Ubound I found.
Thanks for corresponding so quickly.

Th. van den Berg
Herautstraat 61
NL-8043 AE

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Nov 12 '05 #5

P: n/a
On 29 Dec 2003 08:39:43 GMT, Th, van den Berg <ma**@2b.nl> wrote:

Sorry, my bad. Split was introduced with Access 2000, if I'm not
mistaken. You must be on Access 97 or before. In that case, you could
write your own Split function, or find a similar solution using the
InStr function to find spaces. To actually pick the parts apart, you
can use combinations of Left$, Mid$, Right$.

-Tom.

My excuses Tom, but I am in this game some time/ I do not ask quicly/
I use the dutch version, i looked through all the help items and I found
"splitsen" which is the dutch equivalent of "split". But it mentions
splitting databases not fields.
Ubound I found.
Thanks for corresponding so quickly.

Th. van den Berg
Herautstraat 61
NL-8043 AE

*** Sent via Developersdex http://www.developersdex.com ***
Don't just participate in USENET...get rewarded for it!


Nov 12 '05 #6

P: n/a
"Tom van Stiphout" wrote
Sorry, my bad. Split was introduced
with Access 2000, if I'm not mistaken.
You must be on Access 97 or before.
In that case, you could write your own
Split function, or find a similar solution
using the InStr function to find spaces.
To actually pick the parts apart, you
can use combinations of Left$, Mid$,
Right$.


And, searching at http://groups.google.com might very well lead to a Split
function that can just be copied and used. I remember that Joe Foster had
one for Access 2.0 that he called "detokenize". I don't think he has a
website now with code on it, but there might be a copy in the newsgroup
archive. I'm sure there will be some others, too.

Larry Linson
Microsoft Access MVP

Nov 12 '05 #7

P: n/a
"Larry Linson" <bo*****@localhost.not> wrote in message
news:Bd****************@nwrddc01.gnilink.net...
"Tom van Stiphout" wrote
> Sorry, my bad. Split was introduced
> with Access 2000, if I'm not mistaken.
> You must be on Access 97 or before.
> In that case, you could write your own
> Split function, or find a similar solution
> using the InStr function to find spaces.
> To actually pick the parts apart, you
> can use combinations of Left$, Mid$,
> Right$.


And, searching at http://groups.google.com might very well lead to a Split
function that can just be copied and used. I remember that Joe Foster had
one for Access 2.0 that he called "detokenize". I don't think he has a
website now with code on it, but there might be a copy in the newsgroup
archive. I'm sure there will be some others, too.


If you can't find Joe's, http://support.microsoft.com/?id=188007 contains
sample functions (although they're poorly written)

--
Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
http://I.Am/DougSteele
(No private e-mails, please)

Nov 12 '05 #8

P: n/a
rkc

"Larry Linson" <bo*****@localhost.not> wrote in message
news:Bd****************@nwrddc01.gnilink.net...
And, searching at http://groups.google.com might very well lead to a Split
function that can just be copied and used. I remember that Joe Foster had
one for Access 2.0 that he called "detokenize". I don't think he has a
website now with code on it, but there might be a copy in the newsgroup
archive. I'm sure there will be some others, too.


Everybody and their Uncle Bob has posted a Split function, including
one by Ken Getz.
Nov 12 '05 #9

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