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Best way to handle distributing runtime installables from the web??? (slightly O.T.)

P: n/a
MLH
I have little or no knowledge as to how a runtime Access database
application might be distributed from a website. I am sure that I'm
about to find out. I do have one question for you wizards though...

My experience has shown that when I have installed applications
from the web, my browser generally asks what I want to do with
the file... Do I wanna save it? or Do I wanna run it? The browser
generally warns about the dangers of executing downloadable
files. My typical procedure is to save the file to a known location
and run it offline - or at least after closing running applications.

Is it possible to offer only the alternative of running the install
executable and prohibit downloading?
Nov 12 '05 #1
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5 Replies


P: n/a
MLH wrote:
I have little or no knowledge as to how a runtime Access database
application might be distributed from a website. I am sure that I'm
about to find out. I do have one question for you wizards though...

My experience has shown that when I have installed applications
from the web, my browser generally asks what I want to do with
the file... Do I wanna save it? or Do I wanna run it? The browser
generally warns about the dangers of executing downloadable
files. My typical procedure is to save the file to a known location
and run it offline - or at least after closing running applications.

Is it possible to offer only the alternative of running the install
executable and prohibit downloading?


Would you really want to do that? The runtime is not exactly going to be a
trivial download (even on a broadband connection) so it would seem quite
reasonable to allow people to download the whole package before they run it.

Either way you're going to have to be sure you can afford the bandwidth
costs once you start to get numerous requests. And my gut feeling is that
streaming an installation routine to multiple users is not easy (what
happens if the connection is severed? Do they have to start over? Can you
be *very* confident in the efficacy of the intallation routine in this
context?)

The bigger software players are clearly able to do what you are talking
about. Take upgrading to Internet Explorer 6. This entails downloading a
small download program, which still might incur a browser warning. Once you
run this all the various IE components are downloaded and automatically
installed.

It would be interesting to put a test runtime installation package on a
website, request the setup.exe file and see what happens. If it installs
then I guess you could write your download program which makes this request
on behalf of the user, so they never request the runtime install directly.
Nov 12 '05 #2

P: n/a
I just packaged a runtime dist with a smallish db (around 6 megs, no data in
the tables). I use the Wise Professional version 9.0 with sagekey scripts.
The package includes all the files necessary to upgrade, if necessary, the
target machine (MDAC 2.7) and a few references (Total Access memo, an
Activex Email control) and the standard other items.

The download was 47 megs. Quite a download for any user, especially one on a
dialup ... I doubt they would even take the time to do it. The Wise system
offers an intelligent updater option that I am exploring to see if I can
distribute only the front end and have it automatically be installed (after
the customer does a full install, of course), and I'm fairly sure it will
work OR include my necessary files (the frontend, basically) and store other
files (like the runtime, MDAC installs, etc) on my secure server and have
the install program download and install as needed. I believe the Pro
version can do this, but I'm still researching it. At almost $1000 US (plus
$425 for the Sagekey scripts) you better have a real need for it.
--
Scott McDaniel
CS Computer Software
www.thedatabaseplace.net

"MLH" <CR**@NorthState.net> wrote in message
news:um********************************@4ax.com...
I have little or no knowledge as to how a runtime Access database
application might be distributed from a website. I am sure that I'm
about to find out. I do have one question for you wizards though...

My experience has shown that when I have installed applications
from the web, my browser generally asks what I want to do with
the file... Do I wanna save it? or Do I wanna run it? The browser
generally warns about the dangers of executing downloadable
files. My typical procedure is to save the file to a known location
and run it offline - or at least after closing running applications.

Is it possible to offer only the alternative of running the install
executable and prohibit downloading?

Nov 12 '05 #3

P: n/a
Yes, Wise and SageKey get high marks but they are not cheap stuff. I worked
on a project where I assisted in choosing Installer Software, back in 1995,
and I found only one significant difference, web installation, and that was
the deciding factor for the prime contractor. I think, though, by the time
we actually distributed anything, InstallShield had the feature, too.

One of my colleagues did the scripting and found it very powerful. We did
not use SageKey partly because we were not distributing runtime -- the
client company had thousands of unused Access 2.0 licenses and were
installing full retail Access 2.0, along with the Access 2.0 client
application, and a third-party graphics/imaging package.

Larry Linson
Microsoft Access MVP
"Scott McDaniel" <scott@NOSPAM__thedatabaseplace.net> wrote in message
news:9c********************@comcast.com...
I just packaged a runtime dist with a smallish db (around 6 megs, no data in the tables). I use the Wise Professional version 9.0 with sagekey scripts.
The package includes all the files necessary to upgrade, if necessary, the
target machine (MDAC 2.7) and a few references (Total Access memo, an
Activex Email control) and the standard other items.

The download was 47 megs. Quite a download for any user, especially one on a dialup ... I doubt they would even take the time to do it. The Wise system
offers an intelligent updater option that I am exploring to see if I can
distribute only the front end and have it automatically be installed (after the customer does a full install, of course), and I'm fairly sure it will
work OR include my necessary files (the frontend, basically) and store other files (like the runtime, MDAC installs, etc) on my secure server and have
the install program download and install as needed. I believe the Pro
version can do this, but I'm still researching it. At almost $1000 US (plus $425 for the Sagekey scripts) you better have a real need for it.
--
Scott McDaniel
CS Computer Software
www.thedatabaseplace.net

"MLH" <CR**@NorthState.net> wrote in message
news:um********************************@4ax.com...
I have little or no knowledge as to how a runtime Access database
application might be distributed from a website. I am sure that I'm
about to find out. I do have one question for you wizards though...

My experience has shown that when I have installed applications
from the web, my browser generally asks what I want to do with
the file... Do I wanna save it? or Do I wanna run it? The browser
generally warns about the dangers of executing downloadable
files. My typical procedure is to save the file to a known location
and run it offline - or at least after closing running applications.

Is it possible to offer only the alternative of running the install
executable and prohibit downloading?


Nov 12 '05 #4

P: n/a
Both you and Scott brought up a topic that I have a question on.

Let's say I distribute a new version. Folks with a prior version already have
1) the database back end and 2) the run-time files. Do you create 3 setups...1
for the database backend the second for the front end and the third for the
runtime?
Larry Linson wrote:
Yes, Wise and SageKey get high marks but they are not cheap stuff. I worked
on a project where I assisted in choosing Installer Software, back in 1995,
and I found only one significant difference, web installation, and that was
the deciding factor for the prime contractor. I think, though, by the time
we actually distributed anything, InstallShield had the feature, too.

One of my colleagues did the scripting and found it very powerful. We did
not use SageKey partly because we were not distributing runtime -- the
client company had thousands of unused Access 2.0 licenses and were
installing full retail Access 2.0, along with the Access 2.0 client
application, and a third-party graphics/imaging package.

Larry Linson
Microsoft Access MVP

"Scott McDaniel" <scott@NOSPAM__thedatabaseplace.net> wrote in message
news:9c********************@comcast.com...
I just packaged a runtime dist with a smallish db (around 6 megs, no data

in
the tables). I use the Wise Professional version 9.0 with sagekey scripts.
The package includes all the files necessary to upgrade, if necessary, the
target machine (MDAC 2.7) and a few references (Total Access memo, an
Activex Email control) and the standard other items.

The download was 47 megs. Quite a download for any user, especially one on

a
dialup ... I doubt they would even take the time to do it. The Wise system
offers an intelligent updater option that I am exploring to see if I can
distribute only the front end and have it automatically be installed

(after
the customer does a full install, of course), and I'm fairly sure it will
work OR include my necessary files (the frontend, basically) and store

other
files (like the runtime, MDAC installs, etc) on my secure server and have
the install program download and install as needed. I believe the Pro
version can do this, but I'm still researching it. At almost $1000 US

(plus
$425 for the Sagekey scripts) you better have a real need for it.
--
Scott McDaniel
CS Computer Software
www.thedatabaseplace.net

"MLH" <CR**@NorthState.net> wrote in message
news:um********************************@4ax.com...
I have little or no knowledge as to how a runtime Access database
application might be distributed from a website. I am sure that I'm
about to find out. I do have one question for you wizards though...

My experience has shown that when I have installed applications
from the web, my browser generally asks what I want to do with
the file... Do I wanna save it? or Do I wanna run it? The browser
generally warns about the dangers of executing downloadable
files. My typical procedure is to save the file to a known location
and run it offline - or at least after closing running applications.

Is it possible to offer only the alternative of running the install
executable and prohibit downloading?



Nov 12 '05 #5

P: n/a
The distribution I mentioned was an Access 2.0 client application,
conditional installation of Access 2.0 itsself, and conditional installation
of third-party image processing software. This distribution was, initially,
sent to the new user on CD, and later in the life of the project, downloaded
by the user from a central server. The Wise Installer script determined the
need to install Access and the third-party software. There were no tables on
the remote user's machine, except some rarely-changed lookup tables in the
Access client database (U.S. States and Canadian Province postal codes, for
example).

If you are using only the Packaging Wizard in the Developer Edition or the
Visual Studio Tools for Office 2003, then I believe you _may_ need to create
multiple setups. It has been some time since I created an install with the
Microsoft tools, and that was just for a demonstration.

In most of my client work, full retail Office Pro was on the desktop of each
user because the client companies knew that information workers could make
good use of database software, in addition to the "developed applications"
we were providing. In those shops, there was no "install" -- just copy the
Access database(s) from a server folder to the user's folder.

Larry Linson
Microsoft Access MVP

"Salad" <hi**********@ranch.com> wrote in message
news:3F***************@ranch.com...
Both you and Scott brought up a topic that I have a question on.

Let's say I distribute a new version. Folks with a prior version already have 1) the database back end and 2) the run-time files. Do you create 3 setups...1 for the database backend the second for the front end and the third for the runtime?
Larry Linson wrote:
Yes, Wise and SageKey get high marks but they are not cheap stuff. I worked on a project where I assisted in choosing Installer Software, back in 1995, and I found only one significant difference, web installation, and that was the deciding factor for the prime contractor. I think, though, by the time we actually distributed anything, InstallShield had the feature, too.

One of my colleagues did the scripting and found it very powerful. We did not use SageKey partly because we were not distributing runtime -- the
client company had thousands of unused Access 2.0 licenses and were
installing full retail Access 2.0, along with the Access 2.0 client
application, and a third-party graphics/imaging package.

Larry Linson
Microsoft Access MVP

"Scott McDaniel" <scott@NOSPAM__thedatabaseplace.net> wrote in message
news:9c********************@comcast.com...
I just packaged a runtime dist with a smallish db (around 6 megs, no data
in
the tables). I use the Wise Professional version 9.0 with sagekey
scripts. The package includes all the files necessary to upgrade, if necessary, the target machine (MDAC 2.7) and a few references (Total Access memo, an
Activex Email control) and the standard other items.

The download was 47 megs. Quite a download for any user, especially one on a
dialup ... I doubt they would even take the time to do it. The Wise

system offers an intelligent updater option that I am exploring to see if I can distribute only the front end and have it automatically be installed

(after
the customer does a full install, of course), and I'm fairly sure it will work OR include my necessary files (the frontend, basically) and store

other
files (like the runtime, MDAC installs, etc) on my secure server and have the install program download and install as needed. I believe the Pro
version can do this, but I'm still researching it. At almost $1000 US

(plus
$425 for the Sagekey scripts) you better have a real need for it.
--
Scott McDaniel
CS Computer Software
www.thedatabaseplace.net

"MLH" <CR**@NorthState.net> wrote in message
news:um********************************@4ax.com...
> I have little or no knowledge as to how a runtime Access database
> application might be distributed from a website. I am sure that I'm
> about to find out. I do have one question for you wizards though...
>
> My experience has shown that when I have installed applications
> from the web, my browser generally asks what I want to do with
> the file... Do I wanna save it? or Do I wanna run it? The browser
> generally warns about the dangers of executing downloadable
> files. My typical procedure is to save the file to a known location
> and run it offline - or at least after closing running applications. >
> Is it possible to offer only the alternative of running the install
> executable and prohibit downloading?

Nov 12 '05 #6

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.