By using this site, you agree to our updated Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Manage your Cookies Settings.
448,837 Members | 1,681 Online
Bytes IT Community
+ Ask a Question
Need help? Post your question and get tips & solutions from a community of 448,837 IT Pros & Developers. It's quick & easy.

Updaing Old MS Access Applications.

P: n/a
Hello All,
This is my first time actually posting a question to this group.
Here is my situataion. I have an old access application that needs to
be updated so that multiple developers are able to work on the
program, be able to work in a disconnected mode. Meaning that a user
could take the database anywhere on his laptop and not require a
internet connection to use the system. Currently it is written in
MS-Access 97 and MS-Access 2000. We are thinkin of a stragety on how
to upgrade the technology behind it. We are torn between JSP, .NET or
stand alone .NET or JAVA application. Any one that has a
reccomendation or any experience in this; your help is very
appreciated.

Thanks,
David Markowski
Nov 12 '05 #1
Share this Question
Share on Google+
7 Replies


P: n/a
Couldn't really comment much more as I've never used it, but apparently
Access 2000 replication will do this with a minimum of fuss. You'll have to
check the help files for more of a how-to.

"davdgreat" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:18*************************@posting.google.co m...
Hello All,
This is my first time actually posting a question to this group.
Here is my situataion. I have an old access application that needs to
be updated so that multiple developers are able to work on the
program, be able to work in a disconnected mode. Meaning that a user
could take the database anywhere on his laptop and not require a
internet connection to use the system. Currently it is written in
MS-Access 97 and MS-Access 2000. We are thinkin of a stragety on how
to upgrade the technology behind it. We are torn between JSP, .NET or
stand alone .NET or JAVA application. Any one that has a
reccomendation or any experience in this; your help is very
appreciated.

Thanks,
David Markowski

Nov 12 '05 #2

P: n/a
That is good to know. But would you reccomend a new technology besides
ACCESS??

*** Sent via Developersdex http://www.developersdex.com ***
Don't just participate in USENET...get rewarded for it!
Nov 12 '05 #3

P: n/a

Yes that is good to know, but havent used it yet either. But do you
think that getting out of access is a better bet then keeping it all in
access??

Dave

*** Sent via Developersdex http://www.developersdex.com ***
Don't just participate in USENET...get rewarded for it!
Nov 12 '05 #4

P: n/a
I'd recommend that you keep it in Access because your existing system
already uses it and it has the functionality to do the job. None of the
other tools offer any real advantage over Access and if anything the Total
Cost of Ownership will rise.

Despite a lot of the criticism thrown at Access by database purists it is
the finest *all round* database package on the market bar none. If you
don't have the expertise on hand to answer these kind of questions then you
should seriously consider whether moving systems is a really good idea.

Of course if you have the money to throw around then feel free to keep us
hard-up contractors in work :-)
"David Markowski" <da*******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:3f*********************@news.frii.net...

Yes that is good to know, but havent used it yet either. But do you
think that getting out of access is a better bet then keeping it all in
access??

Dave

*** Sent via Developersdex http://www.developersdex.com ***
Don't just participate in USENET...get rewarded for it!

Nov 12 '05 #5

P: n/a
TC

"Ben Eaton" <be************@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:bp***********@news.wplus.net...

(snip)
Despite a lot of the criticism thrown at Access by database purists it is
the finest *all round* database package on the market bar none.

Er ....

I am a strong supporter of Access. I believe it is far and away the bestdesktop< database on the market. But it is not even remotely the finest
all-round< database on the market!


For example, Access (really Jet) does not have proper transaction handling.
That fact alone, makes it >substantially< less capable, in that key area,
than >any< "industrial strength" database (eg. SQL Server or Oracle).

TC

Nov 12 '05 #6

P: n/a
Lets not confuse JET with ms-access. The last 3 versions of office has
shipped with a 100% compatible sql server engine anyway.

So, triggers, transactions, and even server side code has been available to
ms-access developers for the LAST 3 versions of office at no extra cost.
That is one heck of a long time!

So, while JET does not have these features, the other engine that has been
shipping with ms-access on the CD for years and years does have these
features.

We want to be clear here, as Ms-access is just the client to whatever
database engine you choose anyway. At least you did mention JET in your
context of your response, but there has been other data engine choices for a
very long time indeed. One does not have to assume JET when speaking of
ms-access.

However, I will say that most people do assume that ms-access = JET, and it
would somewhat safe to say in general that ms-access applications generally
are (fairly) assumed to be using JET, but that is now not such a given
anymore.

--
Albert D. Kallal (MVP)
Edmonton, Alberta Canada
No************@msn.com
http://www.attcanada.net/~kallal.msn
Nov 12 '05 #7

P: n/a
TC
Yes, points well taken.

TC
"Albert D. Kallal" <pl********************@msn.com> wrote in message
news:mlWub.437479$6C4.346737@pd7tw1no...
Lets not confuse JET with ms-access. The last 3 versions of office has
shipped with a 100% compatible sql server engine anyway.

So, triggers, transactions, and even server side code has been available to ms-access developers for the LAST 3 versions of office at no extra cost.
That is one heck of a long time!

So, while JET does not have these features, the other engine that has been
shipping with ms-access on the CD for years and years does have these
features.

We want to be clear here, as Ms-access is just the client to whatever
database engine you choose anyway. At least you did mention JET in your
context of your response, but there has been other data engine choices for a very long time indeed. One does not have to assume JET when speaking of
ms-access.

However, I will say that most people do assume that ms-access = JET, and it would somewhat safe to say in general that ms-access applications generally are (fairly) assumed to be using JET, but that is now not such a given
anymore.

--
Albert D. Kallal (MVP)
Edmonton, Alberta Canada
No************@msn.com
http://www.attcanada.net/~kallal.msn

Nov 12 '05 #8

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.