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Use Access DB without Access

P: n/a
Hi,
How can I use a MS-Access DB in a computer without Access installed? I
read something about a "runtime" utility, but I don't know how to use
it.
Any help?
Thanks
Nov 12 '05 #1
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8 Replies


P: n/a
First of all you must have the office developers edition which gives you the
tools and the licence to distribute the access run-time. The developers
edition version you get must be the same as the access version you're using;
97, 2000 or 2002(XP).

Stewart
"Francisco" <fd******@ufl.edu> wrote in message
news:8a*************************@posting.google.co m...
Hi,
How can I use a MS-Access DB in a computer without Access installed? I
read something about a "runtime" utility, but I don't know how to use
it.
Any help?
Thanks

Nov 12 '05 #2

P: n/a
The Developer's version of Office Professional includes the ability to package
the Access run-time components for distribution. You use the Package &
Deployment wizard to create an executable file that can be installed on the
target PC. (MS has changed the name from Developer's version to something else
for Office 2003).

If you are the one who does not have Access installed, then you'll need to talk
to the person who developed the database and ask them to create a distribution
file. Hopefully, they will have a copy of the Developer's version of Office.

____________________________________

"Francisco" <fd******@ufl.edu> wrote in message
news:8a*************************@posting.google.co m...
Hi,
How can I use a MS-Access DB in a computer without Access installed? I
read something about a "runtime" utility, but I don't know how to use
it.
Any help?
Thanks
Nov 12 '05 #3

P: n/a
"Tom Wickerath" <AOS168 @ comcast . net> wrote in message
news:Hn********@news.boeing.com...
The Developer's version of Office Professional includes the ability to package the Access run-time components for distribution. You use the Package &
Deployment wizard to create an executable file that can be installed on the target PC. (MS has changed the name from Developer's version to something else for Office 2003).

FYI Tom: The Access Runtime DOES NOT create an executable file. It is
basically the full Access system without the ability to modify forms and a
few other things.

Ruben Baumann
If you are the one who does not have Access installed, then you'll need to talk to the person who developed the database and ask them to create a distribution file. Hopefully, they will have a copy of the Developer's version of Office.
____________________________________

"Francisco" <fd******@ufl.edu> wrote in message
news:8a*************************@posting.google.co m...
Hi,
How can I use a MS-Access DB in a computer without Access installed? I
read something about a "runtime" utility, but I don't know how to use
it.
Any help?
Thanks

Nov 12 '05 #4

P: n/a
"R Baumann" <ry**@9yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:vp************@corp.supernews.com...
"Tom Wickerath" <AOS168 @ comcast . net> wrote in message
news:Hn********@news.boeing.com...
The Developer's version of Office Professional includes the ability to package
the Access run-time components for distribution. You use the Package &
Deployment wizard to create an executable file that can be installed on

the
target PC. (MS has changed the name from Developer's version to

something else
for Office 2003).

FYI Tom: The Access Runtime DOES NOT create an executable file. It is
basically the full Access system without the ability to modify forms and a
few other things.

Ruben Baumann
If you are the one who does not have Access installed, then you'll need

to talk
to the person who developed the database and ask them to create a

distribution
file. Hopefully, they will have a copy of the Developer's version of

Office.

____________________________________

"Francisco" <fd******@ufl.edu> wrote in message
news:8a*************************@posting.google.co m...
Hi,
How can I use a MS-Access DB in a computer without Access installed? I
read something about a "runtime" utility, but I don't know how to use
it.
Any help?
Thanks


FYI R Baumann
The developer's version DOES create an executable file. I think if you
re-read Tom's reply you will see that everything he has said is true. This
is not the same as saying that you can create a file which can run without
msaccess.exe.

Fletcher
Nov 12 '05 #5

P: n/a
On Tue, 28 Oct 2003 22:18:51 +0000 (UTC), "Fletcher Arnold"
<fl****@home.com> wrote:

I disagree. The developer's version DOES NOT create an executable
file. When you run the Package and Deployment Wizard (P&DW), as one of
the files in the package it includes setup.exe, which may be the
executable file you are referring to. But that file is not created;
it's a static file capable of installing the CAB file created with
P&DW.
The Access application is not turned into an executable file either.
Rather a special "runtime" version of Access is included with the
setup program, and it is used in the shortcut to run the app:
<path to>msaccess.exe <path to>myapp.mdb
or .mde as the case may be.

<soapbox>
Users should not be concerned about this. Some think VB is superior
because you can create real EXEs. Not entirely true. VB, just like
Access, relies on a whole host of DLL and other components to do part
of the work. Just copy a VB executable to a virgin machine and you'll
see it doesn't work. Same for C++. In this environment you *can*
create standalone executables, which can be copied to virgin machines
and will work, but that is unusual. Most of these apps rely on
external MFC DLLs or other runtime DLLs to do part of the work.
And even if you have a standalone EXE, doesn't that app rely on the
DLLs that make up the Windows operating system, such as user32.exe,
etc?
</soapbox>

-Tom.
"R Baumann" <ry**@9yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:vp************@corp.supernews.com...
"Tom Wickerath" <AOS168 @ comcast . net> wrote in message
news:Hn********@news.boeing.com...
> The Developer's version of Office Professional includes the ability to

package
> the Access run-time components for distribution. You use the Package &
> Deployment wizard to create an executable file that can be installed on

the
> target PC. (MS has changed the name from Developer's version to

something
else
> for Office 2003).
>


FYI Tom: The Access Runtime DOES NOT create an executable file. It is
basically the full Access system without the ability to modify forms and a
few other things.

Ruben Baumann
> If you are the one who does not have Access installed, then you'll need

to
talk
> to the person who developed the database and ask them to create a

distribution
> file. Hopefully, they will have a copy of the Developer's version of

Office.
>
> ____________________________________
>
> "Francisco" <fd******@ufl.edu> wrote in message
> news:8a*************************@posting.google.co m...
> Hi,
> How can I use a MS-Access DB in a computer without Access installed? I
> read something about a "runtime" utility, but I don't know how to use
> it.
> Any help?
> Thanks


FYI R Baumann
The developer's version DOES create an executable file. I think if you
re-read Tom's reply you will see that everything he has said is true. This
is not the same as saying that you can create a file which can run without
msaccess.exe.

Fletcher


Nov 12 '05 #6

P: n/a
I was, indeed, referring to the Setup.exe file and, without stating so, the
associated .CAB file as well. I was not necessarily aware that Setup.exe is a
static file. In any case, it is written to (ie. "created") in the target folder
for a person to use. It very well may be copied from some other location on
their hard drive. Thanks for the education.

______________________________

"Tom van Stiphout" <to*****@no.spam.cox.net> wrote in message
news:9s********************************@4ax.com...
On Tue, 28 Oct 2003 22:18:51 +0000 (UTC), "Fletcher Arnold"
<fl****@home.com> wrote:

I disagree. The developer's version DOES NOT create an executable
file. When you run the Package and Deployment Wizard (P&DW), as one of
the files in the package it includes setup.exe, which may be the
executable file you are referring to. But that file is not created;
it's a static file capable of installing the CAB file created with
P&DW.
The Access application is not turned into an executable file either.
Rather a special "runtime" version of Access is included with the
setup program, and it is used in the shortcut to run the app:
<path to>msaccess.exe <path to>myapp.mdb
or .mde as the case may be.

<soapbox>
Users should not be concerned about this. Some think VB is superior
because you can create real EXEs. Not entirely true. VB, just like
Access, relies on a whole host of DLL and other components to do part
of the work. Just copy a VB executable to a virgin machine and you'll
see it doesn't work. Same for C++. In this environment you *can*
create standalone executables, which can be copied to virgin machines
and will work, but that is unusual. Most of these apps rely on
external MFC DLLs or other runtime DLLs to do part of the work.
And even if you have a standalone EXE, doesn't that app rely on the
DLLs that make up the Windows operating system, such as user32.exe,
etc?
</soapbox>

-Tom.
"R Baumann" <ry**@9yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:vp************@corp.supernews.com...
"Tom Wickerath" <AOS168 @ comcast . net> wrote in message
news:Hn********@news.boeing.com...
> The Developer's version of Office Professional includes the ability to

package
> the Access run-time components for distribution. You use the Package &
> Deployment wizard to create an executable file that can be installed on

the
> target PC. (MS has changed the name from Developer's version to

something
else
> for Office 2003).
>


FYI Tom: The Access Runtime DOES NOT create an executable file. It is
basically the full Access system without the ability to modify forms and a
few other things.

Ruben Baumann
> If you are the one who does not have Access installed, then you'll need

to
talk
> to the person who developed the database and ask them to create a

distribution
> file. Hopefully, they will have a copy of the Developer's version of

Office.
>
> ____________________________________
>
> "Francisco" <fd******@ufl.edu> wrote in message
> news:8a*************************@posting.google.co m...
> Hi,
> How can I use a MS-Access DB in a computer without Access installed? I
> read something about a "runtime" utility, but I don't know how to use
> it.
> Any help?
> Thanks


FYI R Baumann
The developer's version DOES create an executable file. I think if you
re-read Tom's reply you will see that everything he has said is true. This
is not the same as saying that you can create a file which can run without
msaccess.exe.

Fletcher

Nov 12 '05 #7

P: n/a
"Tom van Stiphout" <to*****@no.spam.cox.net> wrote in message
news:9s********************************@4ax.com...
On Tue, 28 Oct 2003 22:18:51 +0000 (UTC), "Fletcher Arnold"
<fl****@home.com> wrote:

I disagree. The developer's version DOES NOT create an executable
file. When you run the Package and Deployment Wizard (P&DW), as one of
the files in the package it includes setup.exe, which may be the
executable file you are referring to. But that file is not created;
it's a static file capable of installing the CAB file created with
P&DW.
The Access application is not turned into an executable file either.
Rather a special "runtime" version of Access is included with the
setup program, and it is used in the shortcut to run the app:
<path to>msaccess.exe <path to>myapp.mdb
or .mde as the case may be.

<soapbox>
Users should not be concerned about this. Some think VB is superior
because you can create real EXEs. Not entirely true. VB, just like
Access, relies on a whole host of DLL and other components to do part
of the work. Just copy a VB executable to a virgin machine and you'll
see it doesn't work. Same for C++. In this environment you *can*
create standalone executables, which can be copied to virgin machines
and will work, but that is unusual. Most of these apps rely on
external MFC DLLs or other runtime DLLs to do part of the work.
And even if you have a standalone EXE, doesn't that app rely on the
DLLs that make up the Windows operating system, such as user32.exe,
etc?
</soapbox>

-Tom.

I do understand what the Developer's version will do for you - and have
created a number of run-time applications. The only reason I posted was
that it seemed that Tom W's statement "... includes the ability to package
the Access run-time components for distribution..." is clearly posted by
someone who understands what's going on. R Baumann's "FYI Tom: The Access
Runtime DOES NOT create..." seemed a little patronising and to somewhat miss
the point.

Anyway, I still maintain that an exe file is created - certainly in the
sense if you create an installation disk - the CD starts out blank and ends
up with, among other stuff, setup.exe file on it. In that sense it has been
created, but I understand this is a slightly silly discussion to be having.

Fletcher
Nov 12 '05 #8

P: n/a
Access runtime can be installed from some MSOffice 2000 CDs. I noted that if
you do a full install of the MSOffice 2000 CD (check every box), MS Access
runtime is installed.

Note: I have only noticed this on Dell OEM CDs. Also I see no reference to
the runtime in the installation wizard. Some Access sample application must
be on this CD. We run full Access97 so this feature was more of a problem
then a help.

"Francisco" <fd******@ufl.edu> wrote in message
news:8a*************************@posting.google.co m...
Hi,
How can I use a MS-Access DB in a computer without Access installed? I
read something about a "runtime" utility, but I don't know how to use
it.
Any help?
Thanks

Nov 12 '05 #9

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.