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Built-In Functions in Access?

P: n/a
Anyone know of a good specific source (other than a standard VBA book) with
lots of examples for using just the MS Access 2002 Built-In Functions? I
find the "Expression Builder" and the help files a little lacking and less
than comprehensive. Any sources or Web links would be highly appreciated.

Denny G.
Nov 12 '05 #1
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9 Replies


P: n/a
On Mon, 22 Sep 2003 22:41:50 GMT in comp.databases.ms-access, "Dennys
G." <gi******@adelphia.net> wrote:
Anyone know of a good specific source (other than a standard VBA book) with
lots of examples for using just the MS Access 2002 Built-In Functions? I
find the "Expression Builder" and the help files a little lacking and less
than comprehensive. Any sources or Web links would be highly appreciated.


The help file?

--
A)bort, R)etry, I)nfluence with large hammer.
Nov 12 '05 #2

P: n/a
Thanks, Trevor. Unfortunately, I do not think much of the "help file;" it is only a start. I am sure you have noticed, the Built-In Function (BIF) examples offered by many, even in this newsgroup and others, are far more complicated--better examples than what are available in the "help file." Additionally, in the help file, you have to know what you are looking for before you start wading through it. What I would like to see is a handy single desk source report that can be quickly scanned for a likely candidate. It would contain BIFs only; brief summary descriptions; and several, good, comprehensive examples for each BIF (possibly collected from newsgroups). Sounds like a good database project. If I do not find something like this, perhaps I will go ahead, prepare one myself, and make it available for others.



Denny G.

"Trevor Best" <bouncer@localhost> wrote in message news:cq********************************@4ax.com...
On Mon, 22 Sep 2003 22:41:50 GMT in comp.databases.ms-access, "Dennys
G." <gi******@adelphia.net> wrote:
Anyone know of a good specific source (other than a standard VBA book) with
lots of examples for using just the MS Access 2002 Built-In Functions? I
find the "Expression Builder" and the help files a little lacking and less
than comprehensive. Any sources or Web links would be highly appreciated.


The help file?

--
A)bort, R)etry, I)nfluence with large hammer.

Nov 12 '05 #3

P: n/a
> "Dennys G." <gi******@adelphia.net> wrote in message news:dgZbb.2673
$Y**********@news3.news.adelphia.net...
Thanks, Trevor. Unfortunately, I do not think much of the "help file;"
it is only a start. I am sure you have noticed, the Built-In Function (BIF)
examples offered by many, even in this newsgroup and others, are far
more complicated--better examples than what are available in the "help file."
Additionally, in the help file, you have to know what you are looking for
before you start wading through it. What I would like to see is a handy
single desk source report that can be quickly scanned for a likely candidate.
It would contain BIFs only; brief summary descriptions; and several, good,
comprehensive examples for each BIF (possibly collected from newsgroups).
Sounds like a good database project. If I do not find something like this,
perhaps I will go ahead, prepare one myself, and make it available for others.


Denny G.

The Expression builder does a pretty good job of this. All of the functions listed by
category and instant help on the one where the cursor is positioned. (at least in
Access 97).

Nov 12 '05 #4

P: n/a
Rick, thanks. I'm also familiar with the "expression builder (EB)." Here
is the problem with the EB: For someone new to MS Access, it hard for him
to envision that this: "DCount («expr», «domain», «criteria»)" from the EB
really means this: DCount("*", "Offers", "([OfferDate] >= #" & strDate1 &
"#) AND (#" &> strDate2 & "# >= [OfferDate])").

Denny G.


My experience is if you've never built an expression for a built-in
function, it is a little hard
"Rick Brandt" <RB*****@Hunter.Com> wrote in message
news:bk************@ID-98015.news.uni-berlin.de...
"Dennys G." <gi******@adelphia.net> wrote in message news:dgZbb.2673
$Y**********@news3.news.adelphia.net...
Thanks, Trevor. Unfortunately, I do not think much of the "help file;"
it is only a start. I am sure you have noticed, the Built-In Function (BIF) examples offered by many, even in this newsgroup and others, are far
more complicated--better examples than what are available in the "help file." Additionally, in the help file, you have to know what you are looking for before you start wading through it. What I would like to see is a handy
single desk source report that can be quickly scanned for a likely candidate. It would contain BIFs only; brief summary descriptions; and several, good, comprehensive examples for each BIF (possibly collected from newsgroups). Sounds like a good database project. If I do not find something like this, perhaps I will go ahead, prepare one myself, and make it available for
others.
Denny G.

The Expression builder does a pretty good job of this. All of the functions listed by category and instant help on the one where the cursor is positioned. (at least in Access 97).

Nov 12 '05 #5

P: n/a
In (EB) single click the DCount function then click on the HELP button on
the (EB) dialog box. This will show the Help file listing for DCount.

"Dennys G." <gi******@adelphia.net> wrote in message
news:YZ********************@news3.news.adelphia.ne t...
Rick, thanks. I'm also familiar with the "expression builder (EB)." Here
is the problem with the EB: For someone new to MS Access, it hard for him
to envision that this: "DCount («expr», «domain», «criteria»)" from the EB
really means this: DCount("*", "Offers", "([OfferDate] >= #" & strDate1 & "#) AND (#" &> strDate2 & "# >= [OfferDate])").

Denny G.


My experience is if you've never built an expression for a built-in
function, it is a little hard
"Rick Brandt" <RB*****@Hunter.Com> wrote in message
news:bk************@ID-98015.news.uni-berlin.de...
"Dennys G." <gi******@adelphia.net> wrote in message news:dgZbb.2673
$Y**********@news3.news.adelphia.net...
Thanks, Trevor. Unfortunately, I do not think much of the "help file;" it is only a start. I am sure you have noticed, the Built-In Function (BIF) examples offered by many, even in this newsgroup and others, are far
more complicated--better examples than what are available in the "help file." Additionally, in the help file, you have to know what you are looking for before you start wading through it. What I would like to see is a handy single desk source report that can be quickly scanned for a likely candidate. It would contain BIFs only; brief summary descriptions; and several, good, comprehensive examples for each BIF (possibly collected from newsgroups). Sounds like a good database project. If I do not find something like this, perhaps I will go ahead, prepare one myself, and make it available for

others.

Denny G.

The Expression builder does a pretty good job of this. All of the

functions listed by
category and instant help on the one where the cursor is positioned. (at

least in
Access 97).


Nov 12 '05 #6

P: n/a
rkc

"Dennys G." <gi******@adelphia.net> wrote in message
news:YZ********************@news3.news.adelphia.ne t...
Rick, thanks. I'm also familiar with the "expression builder (EB)." Here
is the problem with the EB: For someone new to MS Access, it hard for him
to envision that this: "DCount («expr», «domain», «criteria»)" from the EB
really means this: DCount("*", "Offers", "([OfferDate] >= #" & strDate1 & "#) AND (#" &> strDate2 & "# >= [OfferDate])").


There's also the object browser. Load up the VBA Library, browse, and
hit F1 when you want details.

You said you didn't want a book, but VB &VBA In a Nutshell from O'Reilly
is exactly what you are looking for.

Take a look here:

http://safari.oreilly.com/?XmlId=1-56592-358-8
Nov 12 '05 #7

P: n/a
"Dennys G." <gi******@adelphia.net> wrote in news:dgZbb.2673$YO5.2362837
@news3.news.adelphia.net:
Thanks, Trevor. Unfortunately, I do not think much of the "help file;" it
is only a start. I am sure you have noticed, the Built-In Function (BIF)
examples offered by many, even in this newsgroup and others, are far more
complicated--better examples than what are available in the "help file."


Gee, I never noticed that.

--
Lyle
(for e-mail refer to http://ffdba.com/contacts.htm)
Nov 12 '05 #8

P: n/a
Thanks, rkc. Sounds as though this book may be just what I want. I have
many books, but only one of O'Reilly's named "Access Cookbook." I shall
investigate your suggestion further.

Denny G.

"rkc" <rk*@yabba.dabba.do.rochester.rr.com> wrote in message
news:4E****************@twister.nyroc.rr.com...

"Dennys G." <gi******@adelphia.net> wrote in message
news:YZ********************@news3.news.adelphia.ne t...
Rick, thanks. I'm also familiar with the "expression builder (EB)." Here is the problem with the EB: For someone new to MS Access, it hard for him to envision that this: "DCount («expr», «domain», «criteria»)" from the EB really means this: DCount("*", "Offers", "([OfferDate] >= #" &
strDate1 &
"#) AND (#" &> strDate2 & "# >= [OfferDate])").


There's also the object browser. Load up the VBA Library, browse, and
hit F1 when you want details.

You said you didn't want a book, but VB &VBA In a Nutshell from O'Reilly
is exactly what you are looking for.

Take a look here:

http://safari.oreilly.com/?XmlId=1-56592-358-8

Nov 12 '05 #9

P: n/a
Thanks Paii. I have done what you are suggesting. The help file is OK, but
not quite comprehensive enough for what I had in mind.

Denny G.
"paii" <pa**@packairinc.com> wrote in message
news:vn************@corp.supernews.com...
In (EB) single click the DCount function then click on the HELP button on
the (EB) dialog box. This will show the Help file listing for DCount.

"Dennys G." <gi******@adelphia.net> wrote in message
news:YZ********************@news3.news.adelphia.ne t...
Rick, thanks. I'm also familiar with the "expression builder (EB)." Here
is the problem with the EB: For someone new to MS Access, it hard for him to envision that this: "DCount («expr», «domain», «criteria»)" from the EB really means this: DCount("*", "Offers", "([OfferDate] >= #" & strDate1
&
"#) AND (#" &> strDate2 & "# >= [OfferDate])").

Denny G.


My experience is if you've never built an expression for a built-in
function, it is a little hard
"Rick Brandt" <RB*****@Hunter.Com> wrote in message
news:bk************@ID-98015.news.uni-berlin.de...
> "Dennys G." <gi******@adelphia.net> wrote in message news:dgZbb.2673
> $Y**********@news3.news.adelphia.net...
> Thanks, Trevor. Unfortunately, I do not think much of the "help

file;" > it is only a start. I am sure you have noticed, the Built-In
Function (BIF)
> examples offered by many, even in this newsgroup and others, are far
> more complicated--better examples than what are available in the
"help file."
> Additionally, in the help file, you have to know what you are
looking for
> before you start wading through it. What I would like to see is a handy > single desk source report that can be quickly scanned for a likely

candidate.
> It would contain BIFs only; brief summary descriptions; and several,

good,
> comprehensive examples for each BIF (possibly collected from

newsgroups).
> Sounds like a good database project. If I do not find something

like this,
> perhaps I will go ahead, prepare one myself, and make it available
for others.

Denny G.

The Expression builder does a pretty good job of this. All of the

functions listed by
category and instant help on the one where the cursor is positioned.
(at least in
Access 97).



Nov 12 '05 #10

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