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Force form resize bigger than screen?

P: n/a
2nd post:

Does anyone know how to set the height of a form passed the inbuilt limit?

I want to set the height of a form so that it will fill a portrait page when
printing.

When the screen resolution is <= 1024x800, the fm.InsideHeight is capped by
Access so that the height is reduced.

Perhaps there is an API to push past this limit?

Thanks
Mark

Nov 12 '05 #1
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2 Replies


P: n/a
I don't have an answer to your problem.

But regarding your question about APIs: there *are* a whole slew of
windowing APIs that I recently plunged into while writing my own
datepicker form. I use Dan Appleman's "VB Programmers' Guide To The
Win32 API". (It's at work, so I can't name any of them.)

One word of caution: what I thought was going to be a simple task
turned out to be much more complicated and require several API calls.
One issue is that if you really want to make your code robust, you
have to call APIs to get a bunch of system information in order to
calculate things that some people assume are constants (like maybe
twips-per-inch). It just snowballed.

-Matt

On Tue, 23 Sep 2003 07:54:14 +1200, "Mark B" <remove_from
_h*********************@ihug.co.nz> wrote:
2nd post:

Does anyone know how to set the height of a form passed the inbuilt limit?

I want to set the height of a form so that it will fill a portrait page when
printing.

When the screen resolution is <= 1024x800, the fm.InsideHeight is capped by
Access so that the height is reduced.

Perhaps there is an API to push past this limit?

Thanks
Mark


Nov 12 '05 #2

P: n/a
"Matthew Sullivan" wrote
I use Dan Appleman's "VB Programmers'
Guide To The Win32 API". One word of caution: what I thought was
going to be a simple task turned out to be
much more complicated and require several
API calls.


I'll add another word of caution: when you use Appleman's book, you have to
keep in mind that it was written for the programmer using classic Visual
Basic, and the object model is different. For a simple example, each control
in VB is a separate "window", but only the Form itself, the currently active
control and SubForm controls are "windows" in Access -- the other controls
are just painted on the screen. So many of the approaches that work with VB
controls just won't work in Access.

That said, there's no better book for explaining the Windows API to a
"Basic-speaker" whether that be VB or VBA than Appleman's.

Unfortunately, when I was doing some work back in Access 2.0 days, I
discovered that because VB had disk/folder/file selection controls built-in,
Appleman didn't address the Windows Common Dialog API, and this was before
it was published in The Developer's Handbook (in Access 2.0, they
illustrated using undocumented calls to Access itself for that purpose, but
not the Windows Common Dialog API -- they published that for Access 95, the
code Ken Getz donated, that you'll find in
http://www.mvps.org/access/api/api0001.htm). Believe me, unless you speak
some more than elementary C, you really don't want to have to dig that kind
of information out of books that cover the API for C programmers.
Nov 12 '05 #3

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