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RDBMS server engines - an overview?

P: n/a
Has anybody seen one? Or care to offer (a brief) one? Yes, I've done some
searching of the archives. Anybody who's read my posts over the past couple
of years (and there must be at least one or two of you!) will know my only
real experience is with Access/Jet. But it's becoming clear to me that for
career's sake I've got to expand my skill set. MS SQL Server is first on the
list, not because it's necessarily the best/most cost effective or whatever,
but because people use it, and I like the look of ADPs. But if I'm
reccomending client(prob Access)/server solutions to customers, what are the
opinions on:

PostGreSQL

MySQL

Oracle

MS SQL Server

DB2

etc.

That's a bit of a broad question, sorry. I'm just after general comparisons
really. And I respect the opinions of the people here.

TIA, Mike MacSween
Nov 12 '05 #1
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12 Replies


P: n/a
An interesting technical characteristic of Oracle, is that it offers the
following four things simultaneously:
o a consistent view of the data returned by each SELECT,
o regardless of how long the SELECT takes to execute,
o even if other processes are comitting updates to the selected records
at the same time, and
o without holding any locks!!

This can be important when:
o there is a very high data entry/update load,
o there are concurrent queries for reports etc.,
o it is essential for those reports to present a consistent view of the
data at one single point in time, and
o it is not acceptable to achive that using data locks (thereby slowing
or suspending other processes).

Oracle also has the full complement of heavy-duty transaction processing &
point-in-time recovery. (As you are doubtless aware, Jet transactions are
not transactions at all. They *do not* guarantee that all the data in the
transaction is saved, or not saved, & the database is left in one of those
two states.)

HTH,
TC
"Mike MacSween" <mi******************@btinternet.com> wrote in message
news:3f*********************@pubnews.gradwell.net. ..
Has anybody seen one? Or care to offer (a brief) one? Yes, I've done some
searching of the archives. Anybody who's read my posts over the past couple of years (and there must be at least one or two of you!) will know my only
real experience is with Access/Jet. But it's becoming clear to me that for
career's sake I've got to expand my skill set. MS SQL Server is first on the list, not because it's necessarily the best/most cost effective or whatever, but because people use it, and I like the look of ADPs. But if I'm
reccomending client(prob Access)/server solutions to customers, what are the opinions on:

PostGreSQL
MySQL
Oracle
MS SQL Server
DB2
etc.

That's a bit of a broad question, sorry. I'm just after general comparisons really. And I respect the opinions of the people here.

TIA, Mike MacSween

Nov 12 '05 #2

P: n/a
TC
So - Oracle it is, Mike!

TC
"Mike MacSween" <mi******************@btinternet.com> wrote in message
news:3f*********************@pubnews.gradwell.net. ..
Has anybody seen one? (snip)


Nov 12 '05 #3

P: n/a
"TC" <a@b.c.d> wrote in message news:1064117934.400231@teuthos...
So - Oracle it is, Mike!


Yup, looks like the one. My 20,000 cheque is in the post now <g>

Mike
Nov 12 '05 #4

P: n/a
On Sun, 21 Sep 2003 07:21:05 +0100 in comp.databases, "Mike MacSween"
<mi******************@btinternet.com> wrote:
"TC" <a@b.c.d> wrote in message news:1064117934.400231@teuthos...
So - Oracle it is, Mike!


Yup, looks like the one. My 20,000 cheque is in the post now <g>


IIRC you can get a personal/developer edition free (not sure about
Windows anymore by certainly on Linux), then just leave it to your
clients to hand over the big cheques :-)

Out of interest, as an Access developer of many years, would you still
consider Access as a front end or go with something else? (given that
Access can still be bandwidth hungry with linked tables).

--
A)bort, R)etry, I)nfluence with large hammer.
Nov 12 '05 #5

P: n/a
"Trevor Best" <bouncer@localhost> wrote in message
news:m1********************************@4ax.com...
On Sun, 21 Sep 2003 07:21:05 +0100 in comp.databases, "Mike MacSween"
<mi******************@btinternet.com> wrote:
"TC" <a@b.c.d> wrote in message news:1064117934.400231@teuthos...
So - Oracle it is, Mike!
Yup, looks like the one. My 20,000 cheque is in the post now <g>


IIRC you can get a personal/developer edition free (not sure about
Windows anymore by certainly on Linux), then just leave it to your
clients to hand over the big cheques :-)


It seems to be about 250 as far as I can tell. But yes, there's certainly a
development version that's a lot cheaper than the one a client would need.
Out of interest, as an Access developer of many years, would you still
consider Access as a front end or go with something else? (given that
Access can still be bandwidth hungry with linked tables).


Not too much experience of any other front end to tell the truth. But I
don't see why not. I think Access is a superb RAD tool. And combined with a
true server backend should be good.

Yours, Mike
Nov 12 '05 #6

P: n/a
"Trevor Best" <bouncer@localhost> wrote in message
news:m1********************************@4ax.com...
On Sun, 21 Sep 2003 07:21:05 +0100 in comp.databases, "Mike MacSween"
<mi******************@btinternet.com> wrote:
"TC" <a@b.c.d> wrote in message news:1064117934.400231@teuthos...
So - Oracle it is, Mike!
Yup, looks like the one. My 20,000 cheque is in the post now <g>


IIRC you can get a personal/developer edition free (not sure about
Windows anymore by certainly on Linux), then just leave it to your
clients to hand over the big cheques :-)


Yes the personal edition for windows is still available for free.
Out of interest, as an Access developer of many years, would you still
consider Access as a front end or go with something else? (given that
Access can still be bandwidth hungry with linked tables).

--
A)bort, R)etry, I)nfluence with large hammer.

Nov 12 '05 #7

P: n/a
TC

Harald Fuchs <no****@sap.com> wrote in message
news:pu************@srv.protecting.net...
In article <1064065832.367431@teuthos>,
"cafe" <a@b.c.d> writes:
An interesting technical characteristic of Oracle, is that it offers the
following four things simultaneously:
o a consistent view of the data returned by each SELECT,
o regardless of how long the SELECT takes to execute,
o even if other processes are comitting updates to the selected records at the same time, and
o without holding any locks!!

This can be important when:
o there is a very high data entry/update load,
o there are concurrent queries for reports etc.,
o it is essential for those reports to present a consistent view of the data at one single point in time, and
o it is not acceptable to achive that using data locks (thereby slowing or suspending other processes).


What's the difference to PostgreSQL (except of the price)?

Sorry, I don't know anything about PostgreSQL.

TC

Nov 12 '05 #8

P: n/a
"Dana" <da**************@gci.net> wrote in message news:<vm************@corp.supernews.com>...

Yes the personal edition for windows is still available for free.


I'm interested in looking into this too. I'm just a student though,
and I'm looking to expand my horizons.

How can one get a hold of this? Are there any recommended resources
to check out to get started? Is it a major departure from Access /
Jet?
Nov 12 '05 #9

P: n/a
You can download it from the web site. But about 2gb of files! So you need a
high speed connection.

Mike

"Andante.in.Blue" <05********@sneakemail.com> wrote in message
news:bc**************************@posting.google.c om...
"Dana" <da**************@gci.net> wrote in message

news:<vm************@corp.supernews.com>...

Yes the personal edition for windows is still available for free.


I'm interested in looking into this too. I'm just a student though,
and I'm looking to expand my horizons.

How can one get a hold of this? Are there any recommended resources
to check out to get started? Is it a major departure from Access /
Jet?

Nov 12 '05 #10

P: n/a
>> Has anybody seen one? Or care to offer (a brief) one? Yes, I've
done some searching of the archives. <<

Not a bad idea for a book of "50,000 feet overviews" of different
RDBMS architectures.
Nov 12 '05 #11

P: n/a
Go on then Joe. Consider it the 'free gift' I'm getting with my copy of SQL
Puzzles & Answers.

Mike
"--CELKO--" <jo*******@northface.edu> wrote in message
news:a2**************************@posting.google.c om...
Has anybody seen one? Or care to offer (a brief) one? Yes, I've

done some searching of the archives. <<

Not a bad idea for a book of "50,000 feet overviews" of different
RDBMS architectures.

Nov 12 '05 #12

P: n/a
In article <m1********************************@4ax.com>, Trevor Best
<bouncer@localhost.?> writes
On Sun, 21 Sep 2003 07:21:05 +0100 in comp.databases, "Mike MacSween"
<mi******************@btinternet.com> wrote:
"TC" <a@b.c.d> wrote in message news:1064117934.400231@teuthos...
So - Oracle it is, Mike!
Yup, looks like the one. My 20,000 cheque is in the post now <g>


IIRC you can get a personal/developer edition free (not sure about
Windows anymore by certainly on Linux), then just leave it to your
clients to hand over the big cheques :-)


And for three of the others ...

Almost any linux distro will come with MySQL and PostgreSQL. I believe
SuSE comes with DB2 (I've got SuSE but have never bothered with it). And
don't forget SAPdb or whatever they call it now - that's gone down the
MySQL route where SAP keep copyright but it's available under the GPL.

If you get SuSE (a good buy), go for the Professional version initially,
then the upgrade versions. For a developer, the Personal is a waste of
money - it's aimed at the email-web-Word market.
Out of interest, as an Access developer of many years, would you still
consider Access as a front end or go with something else? (given that
Access can still be bandwidth hungry with linked tables).

Or go the Kylix/Delphi route. Just watch the licencing! But that's
cross-platform so you can run your client as well as your server on
linux.

To throw a couple of other dbs into the mix too, look at the commercial
MV dbs - Universe, Unidata, D3, jBASE ... they all support SQL and odbc,
are inherently xml-friendly, and I'd better stop the advocacy here
before I start a flame war ... D3 should be and the rest definitely all
are available as "free for evaluation/testing/personal use" versions.

Cheers,
Wol
--
Anthony W. Youngman <pi***@thewolery.demon.co.uk>
'Yings, yow graley yin! Suz ae rikt dheu,' said the blue man, taking the
thimble. 'What *is* he?' said Magrat. 'They're gnomes,' said Nanny. The man
lowered the thimble. 'Pictsies!' Carpe Jugulum, Terry Pratchett 1998
Visit the MaVerick web-site - <http://www.maverick-dbms.org> Open Source Pick
Nov 12 '05 #13

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