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Distributing Access Applications /w Access Runtime

P: n/a
I was under the impression that if I package my software with Access
Runtime and made certain that end-users opened my program with the
"/runtime switch", they would be using MY installed version of runtime
instead of any Access Runtime that came with any older version of
Access on their machine. Is this correct? If not, is there any way I
can program my software to make certain that they are using the
separate version of Access that I install?

John
Nov 12 '05 #1
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3 Replies


P: n/a
The runtime swith is only used to simulate the runtime environment during
the development stage, while running your app within Access. When you
distribute a runtime application, it is a standalone program that does not
use any other installation of access. Even you can't open it in design mode
and modify it. It will even have its own "exe" file.
I am not a professional developer, so maybe some of the experts here can
explain it better than I did.
Larry
"John Phelan" <jp*********@earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:4d**************************@posting.google.c om...
I was under the impression that if I package my software with Access
Runtime and made certain that end-users opened my program with the
"/runtime switch", they would be using MY installed version of runtime
instead of any Access Runtime that came with any older version of
Access on their machine. Is this correct? If not, is there any way I
can program my software to make certain that they are using the
separate version of Access that I install?

John

Nov 12 '05 #2

P: n/a
Sorry, Larry, but that's incorrect. The Developer edition of Office does not
change your application in any way, shape or form. You distribute the exact
same MDB (or MDE) that you created, along with a royalty-free run-time
version of Access. Users who don't have Access installed can install the
run-time version and use your application.

FWIW, the run-time version of Access is the exact same msaccess.exe as the
full version of Access. Any developer-type features, though, get disabled
through registry entries. (There are literally hundreds of registry
updates--in excess of a thousand--that get made when you install it.)

--
Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
http://I.Am/DougSteele
"Larry" <la*****@ameritech.net> wrote in message
news:0n*******************@newssvr28.news.prodigy. com...
The runtime swith is only used to simulate the runtime environment during
the development stage, while running your app within Access. When you
distribute a runtime application, it is a standalone program that does not
use any other installation of access. Even you can't open it in design mode and modify it. It will even have its own "exe" file.
I am not a professional developer, so maybe some of the experts here can
explain it better than I did.

Nov 12 '05 #3

P: n/a
I am very sorry, and thank you for correcting me. The last thing I want to
do is spread misinfo. I don't have runtime yet, but I thought I understood
what I had read. Obviously not! I should have just kept my mouth shut. So
much to learn yet.
Larry

"Douglas J. Steele" <dj******@canada.com> wrote in message
news:32******************@news04.bloor.is.net.cabl e.rogers.com...
Sorry, Larry, but that's incorrect. The Developer edition of Office does not change your application in any way, shape or form. You distribute the exact same MDB (or MDE) that you created, along with a royalty-free run-time
version of Access. Users who don't have Access installed can install the
run-time version and use your application.

FWIW, the run-time version of Access is the exact same msaccess.exe as the
full version of Access. Any developer-type features, though, get disabled
through registry entries. (There are literally hundreds of registry
updates--in excess of a thousand--that get made when you install it.)

--
Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
http://I.Am/DougSteele
"Larry" <la*****@ameritech.net> wrote in message
news:0n*******************@newssvr28.news.prodigy. com...
The runtime swith is only used to simulate the runtime environment during the development stage, while running your app within Access. When you
distribute a runtime application, it is a standalone program that does not use any other installation of access. Even you can't open it in design

mode
and modify it. It will even have its own "exe" file.
I am not a professional developer, so maybe some of the experts here can
explain it better than I did.


Nov 12 '05 #4

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