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Need Access database on the web

Hi there,
I have a database in Access that I need on the web. The web page
should connect to the database and write records for certain tables
and view records for others. I want to know a reliable way of
connecting Access to a server. I am willing to switch to any version
of Access which might solve the problem. Which server would you
recommend and what are the advanatages and disadvantatges of the
server you propose? Please also inlcude the number of people that can
access the database simultaneously. Thanks

Nihad

Feb 13 '07 #1
21 4103
>Which server would you recommend and what are the
advanatages and disadvantatges of theserver you propose?
I would go with Sql Server because it was specifically designed for
enterprise operations - which anything on the web is an enterprise
operation. Access was not designed for enterprise operations - it was
designed for desktop usage.
>>Please also inlcude the number of people that can
access the database simultaneously
Access can handle one user at a time on an intranet. Sql server can
handle thousands of users at a time on intranet/internet.

Note: Access is not inferior to Sql Server. Both products are designed
by the same company (Microsoft), but they serve different purposes.
There is some minor overlap in purpose, but for enterprise operations,
sql Server is the product of choice.

Rich

*** Sent via Developersdex http://www.developersdex.com ***
Feb 13 '07 #2
On Feb 13, 5:58 pm, Rich P <rpng...@aol.co mwrote:
Which server would you recommend and what are the
advanatages and disadvantatges of theserver you propose?

I would go with Sql Server because it was specifically designed for
enterprise operations - which anything on the web is an enterprise
operation. Access was not designed for enterprise operations - it was
designed for desktop usage.
>Please also inlcude the number of people that can
access the database simultaneously

Access can handle one user at a time on an intranet. Sql server can
handle thousands of users at a time on intranet/internet.

Note: Access is not inferior to Sql Server. Both products are designed
by the same company (Microsoft), but they serve different purposes.
There is some minor overlap in purpose, but for enterprise operations,
sql Server is the product of choice.

Rich

*** Sent via Developersdexht tp://www.developersd ex.com***

If you're entertaining upgrading to Sql Server you might as well look
at some of the other database programs that are a little more tailored
for the web - if only to compare. Some take a bit of learning, but
they tend to be a little easier to maintain. Depending on your
circumstances it may even be free to use. MySql is a popular one and
integrates well with most web languages.

Feb 14 '07 #3
Hi, Rich.
Access can handle one user at a time on an intranet.
Access is a multiuser application and can usually handle half a dozen up to
about 100 (generally about 25 comfortably), but the number of concurrent
users depends upon the data needs of the users (data readers vs. data
inputers, where many more data readers can be accommodated than data
inputers), the database design complexity, the network capabilities, and the
skill level of the Access developer.

If your Access databases are only capable of one user at a time, then I
recommend that you read Access MVP Tom Wickerath's article, "Implementi ng a
Successful Multiuser Access/JET Application" on the following Web page for
some very helpful tips:

http://www.Access.QBuilt.com/html/mu...lications.html

HTH.
Gunny

See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips and tutorials.
Blog: http://DataDevilDog.BlogSpot.com
http://www.Access.QBuilt.com/html/ex...ributors2.html for contact
info.
"Rich P" <rp*****@aol.co mwrote in message
news:45******** *************@n ews.qwest.net.. .
>
>>Which server would you recommend and what are the
advanatage s and disadvantatges of theserver you propose?

I would go with Sql Server because it was specifically designed for
enterprise operations - which anything on the web is an enterprise
operation. Access was not designed for enterprise operations - it was
designed for desktop usage.
>>>Please also inlcude the number of people that can
access the database simultaneously

Access can handle one user at a time on an intranet. Sql server can
handle thousands of users at a time on intranet/internet.

Note: Access is not inferior to Sql Server. Both products are designed
by the same company (Microsoft), but they serve different purposes.
There is some minor overlap in purpose, but for enterprise operations,
sql Server is the product of choice.

Rich

*** Sent via Developersdex http://www.developersdex.com ***

Feb 14 '07 #4
If you're entertaining upgrading to Sql Server you might as well look
at some of the other database programs that are a little more tailored
for the web - if only to compare. Some take a bit of learning, but
they tend to be a little easier to maintain. Depending on your
circumstances it may even be free to use. MySql is a popular one and
integrates well with most web languages.
The problem with MySql is that it is not free for commercial use. You can
use it for testing..but, for any commercial use, then you must pay for a
license.

It turns out that Microsoft has two free database systems you can use. Their
is the MSDE that been included on the office disk for the last 3 versions
of ms-access. And, also, now there is the free edition of sql server
express. You can freely use either of these database engines, where as
MySql you must pay for a license to use.
--
Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP)
Edmonton, Alberta Canada
pl************* ****@msn.com
Feb 14 '07 #5
"Albert D. Kallal" <Pl************ *******@msn.com wrote in
news:P1DAh.9774 49$1T2.413140@p d7urf2no:
The problem with MySql is that it is not free for commercial use.
You can use it for testing..but, for any commercial use, then you
must pay for a license.
Huh? MySQL is open source software. You can download the source code
and compile it yourself. You don't have to pay for the source code.

Now, there is now an Enterprise Version of MySQL that is for pay,
but I see no evidence that anyone has to pay anything for use of the
"community" builds of MySQL, no matter what use you make of it.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.dfenton.com/
usenet at dfenton dot com http://www.dfenton.com/DFA/
Feb 14 '07 #6
>>
Access is a multiuser application and can usually handle half a dozen up
to about 100 (generally about 25 comfortably), but the number of
concurrent users depends upon the data needs of the users (data readers
vs. data
inputers, where many more data readers can be accommodated than data
inputers), the database design complexity, the network capabilities, and
the skill level of the Access developer.
<<
Access was a premier RDBMS in its early days, but those days came and
went. I participate in this NG to stay up on the latest developments
with Access. But I think there is a message to be received when it is
noted that Access is part of the Microsoft OFFICE suite - not an
enterprise development suite - that would be .Net.

For enterprise level stuff, Access has been long overtaken by Sql Server
and .Net. Every project that I have undertaken for the last 3 years
that involved Access was to migrate the Access project/application to
.Net.

Access, combined with the MS Office suite serves the same purpose as the
ACT system - a database with a Office suite of applications where ACT is
that but rolled up into one application. These are great systems at the
office level, but for enterprise level they can't compete with Sql
Server/.Net or Java, Oracle/.Net or Java.
Rich

*** Sent via Developersdex http://www.developersdex.com ***
Feb 14 '07 #7
Hi, Rich.
But I think there is a message to be received when it is
noted that Access is part of the Microsoft OFFICE suite - not an
enterprise development suite
The message to be received is that Access can do most of what desktop
database applications need to do in most offices at a very reasonable
cost -- not the high costs and higher-costing skills required of an
enterprise level development suite. That's why Access is the most popular
database in the world. Organizations don't need to spend tens of thousands
of dollars in licensing costs and for computer equipment and have expensive,
trained professionals to maintain their data in an Access database.
For enterprise level stuff, Access has been long overtaken by Sql Server
and .Net.
Check the statistics. The majority of enterprise level applications is
still on Unix and IBM machines, not Windows. SQL server and .Net don't run
on anything but Windows. The market is using Oracle, Java, and other
technologies that run on multiple platforms, not just Windows.
Every project that I have undertaken for the last 3 years
that involved Access was to migrate the Access project/application to
.Net.
If those migration projects were due to the Access database applications
only handling one user at a time and weren't due to mission critical,
security, 24/7 availability, or scalability issues, then I'm sure many of
the Access experts who post in this newsgroup would have gladly offered to
improve the Access database applications at a far lower cost than the .Net
migrations.
These are great systems at the
office level, but for enterprise level they can't compete with Sql
Server/.Net or Java, Oracle/.Net or Java.
Likewise, the enterprise level development suites' high costs and long
development schedules usually make them impractical at the office level.

HTH.
Gunny

See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips and tutorials.
Blog: http://DataDevilDog.BlogSpot.com
http://www.Access.QBuilt.com/html/ex...ributors2.html for contact
info.
"Rich P" <rp*****@aol.co mwrote in message
news:45******** *************** @news.qwest.net ...
>
>>>
Access is a multiuser application and can usually handle half a dozen up
to about 100 (generally about 25 comfortably), but the number of
concurrent users depends upon the data needs of the users (data readers
vs. data
inputers, where many more data readers can be accommodated than data
inputers), the database design complexity, the network capabilities, and
the skill level of the Access developer.
<<
Access was a premier RDBMS in its early days, but those days came and
went. I participate in this NG to stay up on the latest developments
with Access. But I think there is a message to be received when it is
noted that Access is part of the Microsoft OFFICE suite - not an
enterprise development suite - that would be .Net.

For enterprise level stuff, Access has been long overtaken by Sql Server
and .Net. Every project that I have undertaken for the last 3 years
that involved Access was to migrate the Access project/application to
.Net.

Access, combined with the MS Office suite serves the same purpose as the
ACT system - a database with a Office suite of applications where ACT is
that but rolled up into one application. These are great systems at the
office level, but for enterprise level they can't compete with Sql
Server/.Net or Java, Oracle/.Net or Java.
Rich

*** Sent via Developersdex http://www.developersdex.com ***

Feb 15 '07 #8
On Feb 14, 5:44 pm, Rich P <rpng...@aol.co mwrote:
Access is a multiuser application and can usually handle half a dozen up
to about 100 (generally about 25 comfortably), but the number of
concurrent users depends upon the data needs of the users (data readers
vs. data
inputers, where many more data readers can be accommodated than data
inputers), the database design complexity, the network capabilities, and
the skill level of the Access developer.
<<

Access was a premier RDBMS in its early days, but those days came and
went. I participate in this NG to stay up on the latest developments
with Access. But I think there is a message to be received when it is
noted that Access is part of the Microsoft OFFICE suite - not an
enterprise development suite - that would be .Net.

For enterprise level stuff, Access has been long overtaken by Sql Server
and .Net. Every project that I have undertaken for the last 3 years
that involved Access was to migrate the Access project/application to
.Net.

Access, combined with the MS Office suite serves the same purpose as the
ACT system - a database with a Office suite of applications where ACT is
that but rolled up into one application. These are great systems at the
office level, but for enterprise level they can't compete with Sql
Server/.Net or Java, Oracle/.Net or Java.
Access is just fine. Using Access with ASP on the web is just fine. As
there are no persistent connections (or should not be) and each hit is
likely to take a small fraction of a second, hundreds of users can
work with a JET database on the web at the same time. Thousands of
such sites were built and thousands are still percolating merrily
along.
I use SQL Server extensively and .Net less so. There is nothing magic
about these and in 99% of the cases I have come across JET and a COM
application such as Access or ASP would work just as well and possible
better with many fewer headaches and much less expense. IMO there are
two reasons many businesses and other organizations have gone to
something heavier duty than JET and something more exotic than Access
or ASP: first is the MS hype machine which convinces us that we must
have the newest and secondly is the paucity of capable programmers
(witness this thread in particular and CDMA in general over the past
few years). If JET were slowly dying then why would it be necessary to
terminate it? It might be necessary if you thought it interfered with
sales of your SQL goose that lays the golden egg.
To the original poster I say that Gunny's comments, as usual, are
thoughtful,on topic and correct. Others are off-topic or wrong.

Feb 15 '07 #9
Thank you for all your replies.

Some one mentioned that SQL Server cannot run on any operating system
other than windows. I don't recall exactly but isn't MS SQL 2005 cross-
platform?
Yeah I know SQL is great but how much would it cost me approximately
and what about ASP? Is it good? Is there any tool to transfer my ms
access database to the sql server or any other server easily without
losing data? Thanks

Nihad
On Feb 14, 8:04 pm, "'69 Camaro" <ForwardZERO_SP AM.To.
69Cam...@Spamea ter.orgZERO_SPA Mwrote:
Hi, Rich.
But I think there is a message to be received when it is
noted that Access is part of the Microsoft OFFICE suite - not an
enterprise development suite

The message to be received is that Access can do most of what desktop
database applications need to do in most offices at a very reasonable
cost -- not the high costs and higher-costing skills required of an
enterprise level development suite. That's why Access is the most popular
database in the world. Organizations don't need to spend tens of thousands
of dollars in licensing costs and for computer equipment and have expensive,
trained professionals to maintain their data in an Access database.
For enterprise level stuff, Access has been long overtaken by Sql Server
and .Net.

Check the statistics. The majority of enterprise level applications is
still on Unix and IBM machines, not Windows. SQL server and .Net don't run
on anything but Windows. The market is using Oracle, Java, and other
technologies that run on multiple platforms, not just Windows.
Every project that I have undertaken for the last 3 years
that involved Access was to migrate the Access project/application to
.Net.

If those migration projects were due to the Access database applications
only handling one user at a time and weren't due to mission critical,
security, 24/7 availability, or scalability issues, then I'm sure many of
the Access experts who post in this newsgroup would have gladly offered to
improve the Access database applications at a far lower cost than the .Net
migrations.
These are great systems at the
office level, but for enterprise level they can't compete with Sql
Server/.Net or Java, Oracle/.Net or Java.

Likewise, the enterprise level development suites' high costs and long
development schedules usually make them impractical at the office level.

HTH.
Gunny

Seehttp://www.QBuilt.comf or all your database needs.
Seehttp://www.Access.QBui lt.comfor Microsoft Access tips and tutorials.
Blog: http://DataDevilDog.BlogSpot.comhttp...utors2.htmlfor contact
info.

"Rich P" <rpng...@aol.co mwrote in message

news:45******** *************** @news.qwest.net ...


Access is a multiuser application and can usually handle half a dozen up
to about 100 (generally about 25 comfortably), but the number of
concurrent users depends upon the data needs of the users (data readers
vs. data
inputers, where many more data readers can be accommodated than data
inputers), the database design complexity, the network capabilities, and
the skill level of the Access developer.
<<
Access was a premier RDBMS in its early days, but those days came and
went. I participate in this NG to stay up on the latest developments
with Access. But I think there is a message to be received when it is
noted that Access is part of the Microsoft OFFICE suite - not an
enterprise development suite - that would be .Net.
For enterprise level stuff, Access has been long overtaken by Sql Server
and .Net. Every project that I have undertaken for the last 3 years
that involved Access was to migrate the Access project/application to
.Net.
Access, combined with the MS Office suite serves the same purpose as the
ACT system - a database with a Office suite of applications where ACT is
that but rolled up into one application. These are great systems at the
office level, but for enterprise level they can't compete with Sql
Server/.Net or Java, Oracle/.Net or Java.
Rich
*** Sent via Developersdexht tp://www.developersd ex.com***- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -

Feb 15 '07 #10

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