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Ms Access 2003

Is there a way to find out where an application was created from?

i.e. - work or home

i.e. - if application sits on a (work) server/network, the IT people know the
application is sitting there, but is there a way they can find out if that
application was put there from a CD or email or created at work?
Hint: It's not on a client/server database, just native jet database mdb
created on Access 2003 (default 2000)...

--
Message posted via AccessMonster.c om
http://www.accessmonster.com/Uwe/For...ccess/200605/1
May 17 '06 #1
17 4410
Hi, Mell.
if application sits on a (work) server/network, the IT people know the
application is sitting there, but is there a way they can find out if that
application was put there from a CD or email or created at work?
Yes. What have you been doing that this is a concern to you? Are you
asking for our help to cover your tracks? ;-)

HTH.
Gunny

See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips and tutorials.
http://www.Access.QBuilt.com/html/ex...ributors2.html for contact
info.
"Mell via AccessMonster.c om" <u18304@uwe> wrote in message
news:6065c6e0b8 39c@uwe... Is there a way to find out where an application was created from?

i.e. - work or home

i.e. - if application sits on a (work) server/network, the IT people know
the
application is sitting there, but is there a way they can find out if that
application was put there from a CD or email or created at work?
Hint: It's not on a client/server database, just native jet database mdb
created on Access 2003 (default 2000)...

--
Message posted via AccessMonster.c om
http://www.accessmonster.com/Uwe/For...ccess/200605/1

May 17 '06 #2
You are silly.....

no actually, quite the opposite, I have a feeling someone else is doing so on
my time........

Please advise......... .....
Mel

'69 Camaro wrote:
Hi, Mell.
if application sits on a (work) server/network, the IT people know the
application is sitting there, but is there a way they can find out if that
application was put there from a CD or email or created at work?


Yes. What have you been doing that this is a concern to you? Are you
asking for our help to cover your tracks? ;-)

HTH.
Gunny

See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips and tutorials.
http://www.Access.QBuilt.com/html/ex...ributors2.html for contact
info.
Is there a way to find out where an application was created from?

[quoted text clipped - 6 lines]
Hint: It's not on a client/server database, just native jet database mdb
created on Access 2003 (default 2000)...


--
Message posted via AccessMonster.c om
http://www.accessmonster.com/Uwe/For...ccess/200605/1
May 17 '06 #3
Hi, Mell.

The two most common methods of detection depend upon the computer's
operating system. Neither of these methods is absolute proof, but I'll
describe the tell-tale signs that the MDB file was downloaded from either an
E-mail or the Internet, or copied from a CD, and you can make your own
decision whether or not to confront the individual.

If the user's computer is Windows 2000 Professional and he copies an MDB
file from a CD to a hard drive (either his own hard drive or a network hard
drive), then the "Read-only" file attribute will still be set from when the
file was written to the CD, unless the user manually unchecks this attribute
after copying the file to the hard drive. (In Windows Explorer, right-click
on the file name, then select "Properties " on the pop-up menu and look at
the "Read-only" check box at the bottom of the Properties dialog window.)
Windows XP will automatically change the "Read-only" attribute when the file
is copied from the CD, so there's no way to tell it was copied from the CD
just by looking at this attribute afterwards.

If the user's computer is Windows XP SP-2, is using the default Attachment
Manager settings, and the network computer that the file is saved to from an
E-mail attachment is using NTFS, then in Windows Explorer, right-click on
the file name, then select "Properties " on the pop-up menu and look at the
bottom right of the Properties dialog window. If the "Unblock" button is
visible, then you know that the Attachment Manager was at work protecting
the computer, and the user forgot to unblock the file after downloading it.
If the user didn't forget and already unblocked the file, then you won't see
the "Unblock" button. For more information on this security feature, please
see the following Web page:

http://support.microsoft.com/Default.aspx?id=883260

The user can easily cover his tracks by downloading the file from the E-mail
attachment or copying it from the CD, creating a new MDB file on his own
computer, then importing all of the objects from the original into the new
file, then copying this new file out to the network. But when this happens,
all of the objects' "created" date will be the same and all objects will be
created within seconds of each other as well. So if the user really wanted
to cover his tracks, then he'd fiddle with his computer's system clock and
change the date and time, create the new MDB file, import an object or two
from the original file, then change the system clock again, import another
object or two, change the system clock, . . . et cetera, so that all of the
objects had different dates and times of creation, like a normal MDB file
would have on an Access developer's computer.

Computer forensics can usually determine which computer was used to create
an MDB file if the file wasn't created that long ago (and hasn't made
significant changes in the meantime, such as replacing the hard drive), but
that's an expensive method to determine the file's origins.

HTH.
Gunny

See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips and tutorials.
http://www.Access.QBuilt.com/html/ex...ributors2.html for contact
info.
"Mell via AccessMonster.c om" <u18304@uwe> wrote in message
news:6066d2645c 901@uwe...
You are silly.....

no actually, quite the opposite, I have a feeling someone else is doing so
on
my time........

Please advise......... .....
Mel

'69 Camaro wrote:
Hi, Mell.
if application sits on a (work) server/network, the IT people know the
application is sitting there, but is there a way they can find out if
that
application was put there from a CD or email or created at work?


Yes. What have you been doing that this is a concern to you? Are you
asking for our help to cover your tracks? ;-)

HTH.
Gunny

See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips and tutorials.
http://www.Access.QBuilt.com/html/ex...ributors2.html for contact
info.
Is there a way to find out where an application was created from?

[quoted text clipped - 6 lines]
Hint: It's not on a client/server database, just native jet database mdb
created on Access 2003 (default 2000)...


--
Message posted via AccessMonster.c om
http://www.accessmonster.com/Uwe/For...ccess/200605/1

May 17 '06 #4
Hey that was great information.... .....

Thank you so kindly...

Tell me, is the below link your site/business/individual?

Good job............ ............... ............... ............... .............
............

Sorry this is not about the message........ ............... ..........

People tell me that most indivual owners/developers - Ms Access usually own
there own business as a second job b/c not reliable enough for steady income
(keep in mind) individual not big boys........... .... Is this true?

'69 Camaro wrote:
Hi, Mell.

The two most common methods of detection depend upon the computer's
operating system. Neither of these methods is absolute proof, but I'll
describe the tell-tale signs that the MDB file was downloaded from either an
E-mail or the Internet, or copied from a CD, and you can make your own
decision whether or not to confront the individual.

If the user's computer is Windows 2000 Professional and he copies an MDB
file from a CD to a hard drive (either his own hard drive or a network hard
drive), then the "Read-only" file attribute will still be set from when the
file was written to the CD, unless the user manually unchecks this attribute
after copying the file to the hard drive. (In Windows Explorer, right-click
on the file name, then select "Properties " on the pop-up menu and look at
the "Read-only" check box at the bottom of the Properties dialog window.)
Windows XP will automatically change the "Read-only" attribute when the file
is copied from the CD, so there's no way to tell it was copied from the CD
just by looking at this attribute afterwards.

If the user's computer is Windows XP SP-2, is using the default Attachment
Manager settings, and the network computer that the file is saved to from an
E-mail attachment is using NTFS, then in Windows Explorer, right-click on
the file name, then select "Properties " on the pop-up menu and look at the
bottom right of the Properties dialog window. If the "Unblock" button is
visible, then you know that the Attachment Manager was at work protecting
the computer, and the user forgot to unblock the file after downloading it.
If the user didn't forget and already unblocked the file, then you won't see
the "Unblock" button. For more information on this security feature, please
see the following Web page:

http://support.microsoft.com/Default.aspx?id=883260

The user can easily cover his tracks by downloading the file from the E-mail
attachment or copying it from the CD, creating a new MDB file on his own
computer, then importing all of the objects from the original into the new
file, then copying this new file out to the network. But when this happens,
all of the objects' "created" date will be the same and all objects will be
created within seconds of each other as well. So if the user really wanted
to cover his tracks, then he'd fiddle with his computer's system clock and
change the date and time, create the new MDB file, import an object or two
from the original file, then change the system clock again, import another
object or two, change the system clock, . . . et cetera, so that all of the
objects had different dates and times of creation, like a normal MDB file
would have on an Access developer's computer.

Computer forensics can usually determine which computer was used to create
an MDB file if the file wasn't created that long ago (and hasn't made
significant changes in the meantime, such as replacing the hard drive), but
that's an expensive method to determine the file's origins.

HTH.
Gunny

See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips and tutorials.
http://www.Access.QBuilt.com/html/ex...ributors2.html for contact
info.
You are silly.....

[quoted text clipped - 29 lines]
Hint: It's not on a client/server database, just native jet database mdb
created on Access 2003 (default 2000)...


--
Message posted via AccessMonster.c om
http://www.accessmonster.com/Uwe/For...ccess/200605/1
May 18 '06 #5
email me if you would like to reply about my off the topic question so I
don't cludder the board.....
mi*******@hotma il.com

Mell wrote:
Hey that was great information.... .....

Thank you so kindly...

Tell me, is the below link your site/business/individual?

Good job............ ............... ............... ............... .............
...........

Sorry this is not about the message........ ............... ..........

People tell me that most indivual owners/developers - Ms Access usually own
there own business as a second job b/c not reliable enough for steady income
(keep in mind) individual not big boys........... .... Is this true?
Hi, Mell.

[quoted text clipped - 59 lines]
> Hint: It's not on a client/server database, just native jet database mdb
> created on Access 2003 (default 2000)...


--
Message posted via AccessMonster.c om
http://www.accessmonster.com/Uwe/For...ccess/200605/1
May 18 '06 #6
> The user can easily cover his tracks by downloading the file from the
E-mail attachment or copying it from the CD, creating a new MDB file on
his own computer, then importing all of the objects from the original into
the new file, then copying this new file out to the network. But when
this happens, all of the objects' "created" date will be the same and all
objects will be created within seconds of each other as well. So if the
user really wanted to cover his tracks, then he'd fiddle with his
computer's system clock and change the date and time, create the new MDB
file, import an object or two from the original file, then change the
system clock again, import another object or two, change the system clock,
. . . et cetera, so that all of the objects had different dates and times
of creation, like a normal MDB file would have on an Access developer's
computer.
I don't know about you, but whenever I do a compact on an MDB file, all of
the objects get a new created time, which is the same for all objects (I
suspect this is because when a compact is performed, a new MDB is created,
and the objects are moved into the new MDB file; still, the compact routine
should reset the created dates to reflect the original, but it doesn't).
Thus, having all objects have the same created date/time would identical to
creating objects from scratch but then performing a compact on the database.

Neil


Computer forensics can usually determine which computer was used to create
an MDB file if the file wasn't created that long ago (and hasn't made
significant changes in the meantime, such as replacing the hard drive),
but that's an expensive method to determine the file's origins.

HTH.
Gunny

See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips and tutorials.
http://www.Access.QBuilt.com/html/ex...ributors2.html for contact
info.
"Mell via AccessMonster.c om" <u18304@uwe> wrote in message
news:6066d2645c 901@uwe...
You are silly.....

no actually, quite the opposite, I have a feeling someone else is doing
so on
my time........

Please advise......... .....
Mel

'69 Camaro wrote:
Hi, Mell.

if application sits on a (work) server/network, the IT people know the
application is sitting there, but is there a way they can find out if
that
application was put there from a CD or email or created at work?

Yes. What have you been doing that this is a concern to you? Are you
asking for our help to cover your tracks? ;-)

HTH.
Gunny

See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips and tutorials.
http://www.Access.QBuilt.com/html/ex...ributors2.html for contact
info.

Is there a way to find out where an application was created from?

[quoted text clipped - 6 lines]
Hint: It's not on a client/server database, just native jet database
mdb
created on Access 2003 (default 2000)...


--
Message posted via AccessMonster.c om
http://www.accessmonster.com/Uwe/For...ccess/200605/1


May 18 '06 #7
Another thing would be to simply look at the database properties and see
who's listed as the author. Again, per the other fellow's note, he could
create a new MDB and just import objects into it. But, assuming he doesn't,
then the author would be someone other than himself (or whoever is the
default on the computer he works on).

Neil

"Mell via AccessMonster.c om" <u18304@uwe> wrote in message
news:6066d2645c 901@uwe...
You are silly.....

no actually, quite the opposite, I have a feeling someone else is doing so
on
my time........

Please advise......... .....
Mel

'69 Camaro wrote:
Hi, Mell.
if application sits on a (work) server/network, the IT people know the
application is sitting there, but is there a way they can find out if
that
application was put there from a CD or email or created at work?


Yes. What have you been doing that this is a concern to you? Are you
asking for our help to cover your tracks? ;-)

HTH.
Gunny

See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips and tutorials.
http://www.Access.QBuilt.com/html/ex...ributors2.html for contact
info.
Is there a way to find out where an application was created from?

[quoted text clipped - 6 lines]
Hint: It's not on a client/server database, just native jet database mdb
created on Access 2003 (default 2000)...


--
Message posted via AccessMonster.c om
http://www.accessmonster.com/Uwe/For...ccess/200605/1

May 18 '06 #8
Neil,

Thank you......

That does make sense....

Neil wrote:
Another thing would be to simply look at the database properties and see
who's listed as the author. Again, per the other fellow's note, he could
create a new MDB and just import objects into it. But, assuming he doesn't,
then the author would be someone other than himself (or whoever is the
default on the computer he works on).

Neil
You are silly.....

[quoted text clipped - 29 lines]
Hint: It's not on a client/server database, just native jet database mdb
created on Access 2003 (default 2000)...


--
Message posted via AccessMonster.c om
http://www.accessmonster.com/Uwe/For...ccess/200605/1
May 19 '06 #9
Hi, Mell.
Tell me, is the below link your site/business/individual?
Access.QBuilt.c om is one of five commercial and non-commercial subdomains
for Q-Built Solutions, a small business which employs five consultants. I'm
one of these consultants.
People tell me that most indivual owners/developers - Ms Access usually
own
there own business as a second job b/c not reliable enough for steady
income
(keep in mind) individual not big boys........... .... Is this true?
That's been my experience, too. The market is so flooded with people who
aren't yet competent in Access -- but pass themselves off as expert Access
developers because they can use the built-in wizards to create forms and
reports to dazzle computer-challenged business owners and managers -- that
many of the ones who are competent Access developers work in other
technologies or industries for their main income. Businesses just aren't
willing to pay money for what's widely percieved as "so easy that any monkey
can do it," and "tinker toy" applications that cause a wide range of
problems, when, in fact, it's the lack of competence of the Access
developers (hired 'em "real cheap!") and occasionally the network
administrators who have caused the vast majority of the problems being
blamed on Access.

The only money I've ever made from working with Access was several years ago
when I was a corporate Access developer for a little more than a year. I'm
an Oracle DBA consultant now for larger businesses, but I also do computer
networking/administration and occasional database-driven Web sites powered
by MySQL for small businesses (only because MySQL is free with their Web
hosting packages).

I've seen the tremendous need in small- and medium-sized businesses for
small, stable database applications that Access would be perfect for, but
almost none of these business owners are willing to pay for that database
application, even when they know the computer automation will save thousands
of man-hours per year. Well, some are willing to pay a high school student
(who has no interest in computers or databases) to spend thousands of hours
to build Access applications that don't work very well -- because these
students work for minimum wage, which is a whole lot cheaper (at least in
these business owners' minds) than spending hundreds of dollars for an
expert to build it correctly in a matter of a few hours.

You want to help these people, but you can't convince them that they need a
competent Access developer because they firmly believe that they've got a
bargain database application, and it works just fine -- except for the long
list of things that don't, including the safeguarding of data integrity.
But it's "good enough" for them.

But I've seen worse. Some business owners think that they can't afford to
hire IT people, so they spend thousands of hours foregoing business
opportunities worth many tens of thousands of dollars (or possibly hundreds
of thousands of dollars per year) while they learn to build their own
computer network with disparate, outdated equipment -- picked it up "real
cheap!" -- and build a mission-critical Access database application that
they intend to run their entire business with, but it just doesn't work.

You want to help these people, too, but you can't afford to pay for the
minimum equipment required (they aren't willing to pay to replace their
bargain equipment that doesn't work together), and you can't afford to spend
two weeks or more fixing their multiple computer, network, virus, and spam
problems before even starting on a database application, and the $100 for
your time doesn't even begin to cover the gasoline bill for the daily trips
to their office for an entire month. ("Hey, it took me more than 2,000
hours and I still can't get it to work, but this is easy for you experts.
You can finish my application in a few days, because it's more than 95%
done! If you don't want the job, I can hire a high school dropout for half
that price!") And they require you to come to their office daily to do the
software development on your own laptop, even after you've fixed their
computer and network problems (at no charge, because the owner isn't willing
to pay you to fix the problems he doesn't believe he created that prevent
Microsoft Office from being installed on each of his computers and a
database from being networked). This is because even though they can't
spare one of their own computers and desks for you to work on, they refuse
to pay you for all the hours you'd be wasting in front of the T.V. or on the
phone talking to your kids instead of working on their application if the
manager wasn't there watching you like a hawk. And you try to explain to
the owner that this working arrangement means that, for tax purposes, you
are a temporary employee of his and he's required by law to pay half the
Social Security taxes on the money you earn from him, but he refuses because
you're a "profession al consultant," not one of his employees.

So it's rather difficult to make a steady income if you're a consultant
looking for customers, and you only work with Access. But perhaps others
have had more favorable business experiences working with Access in their
geographical locations.

HTH.
Gunny

See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips and tutorials.
http://www.Access.QBuilt.com/html/ex...ributors2.html for contact
info.
"Mell via AccessMonster.c om" <u18304@uwe> wrote in message
news:6070a3d137 47d@uwe... Hey that was great information.... .....

Thank you so kindly...

Tell me, is the below link your site/business/individual?

Good
job............ ............... ............... ............... .............
...........

Sorry this is not about the message........ ............... ..........

People tell me that most indivual owners/developers - Ms Access usually
own
there own business as a second job b/c not reliable enough for steady
income
(keep in mind) individual not big boys........... .... Is this true?

'69 Camaro wrote:
Hi, Mell.

The two most common methods of detection depend upon the computer's
operating system. Neither of these methods is absolute proof, but I'll
describe the tell-tale signs that the MDB file was downloaded from either
an
E-mail or the Internet, or copied from a CD, and you can make your own
decision whether or not to confront the individual.

If the user's computer is Windows 2000 Professional and he copies an MDB
file from a CD to a hard drive (either his own hard drive or a network
hard
drive), then the "Read-only" file attribute will still be set from when
the
file was written to the CD, unless the user manually unchecks this
attribute
after copying the file to the hard drive. (In Windows Explorer,
right-click
on the file name, then select "Properties " on the pop-up menu and look at
the "Read-only" check box at the bottom of the Properties dialog window.)
Windows XP will automatically change the "Read-only" attribute when the
file
is copied from the CD, so there's no way to tell it was copied from the CD
just by looking at this attribute afterwards.

If the user's computer is Windows XP SP-2, is using the default Attachment
Manager settings, and the network computer that the file is saved to from
an
E-mail attachment is using NTFS, then in Windows Explorer, right-click on
the file name, then select "Properties " on the pop-up menu and look at the
bottom right of the Properties dialog window. If the "Unblock" button is
visible, then you know that the Attachment Manager was at work protecting
the computer, and the user forgot to unblock the file after downloading
it.
If the user didn't forget and already unblocked the file, then you won't
see
the "Unblock" button. For more information on this security feature,
please
see the following Web page:

http://support.microsoft.com/Default.aspx?id=883260

The user can easily cover his tracks by downloading the file from the
E-mail
attachment or copying it from the CD, creating a new MDB file on his own
computer, then importing all of the objects from the original into the new
file, then copying this new file out to the network. But when this
happens,
all of the objects' "created" date will be the same and all objects will
be
created within seconds of each other as well. So if the user really
wanted
to cover his tracks, then he'd fiddle with his computer's system clock and
change the date and time, create the new MDB file, import an object or two
from the original file, then change the system clock again, import another
object or two, change the system clock, . . . et cetera, so that all of
the
objects had different dates and times of creation, like a normal MDB file
would have on an Access developer's computer.

Computer forensics can usually determine which computer was used to create
an MDB file if the file wasn't created that long ago (and hasn't made
significant changes in the meantime, such as replacing the hard drive),
but
that's an expensive method to determine the file's origins.

HTH.
Gunny

See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips and tutorials.
http://www.Access.QBuilt.com/html/ex...ributors2.html for contact
info.
You are silly.....

[quoted text clipped - 29 lines]
> Hint: It's not on a client/server database, just native jet database
> mdb
> created on Access 2003 (default 2000)...


--
Message posted via AccessMonster.c om
http://www.accessmonster.com/Uwe/For...ccess/200605/1

May 19 '06 #10

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4531
by: ship | last post by:
Hi We need some advice: We are thinking of upgrading our Access database from Access 2000 to Access 2004. How stable is MS Office 2003? (particularly Access 2003). We are just a small company and this is a big decision for us(!) It's not just the money it's committing to an new version of Access!
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9969
by: Neil | last post by:
We are running an Access 2000 MDB with a SQL 7 back end. Our network guy is upgrading to Windows Server 2003 and wants to upgrade Office and SQL Server at the same time. We're moving to SQL Server 2005, and, since he already has licenses for Office Pro 2002, he wants to upgrade to that. I've been saying that we need to upgrade to Access 2003, not 2002, even if Office is kept at 2002. We are also looking to do a fair amount of...
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3223
by: Mell via AccessMonster.com | last post by:
I created databases on Access 2003 and I want to deploy them to users. My code was also done using 2003. If they have Ms Access 2000 or higher, will they be able to use these dbs with all code, etc? Please explain -- Message posted via http://www.accessmonster.com
0
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marktang
by: marktang | last post by:
ONU (Optical Network Unit) is one of the key components for providing high-speed Internet services. Its primary function is to act as an endpoint device located at the user's premises. However, people are often confused as to whether an ONU can Work As a Router. In this blog post, we’ll explore What is ONU, What Is Router, ONU & Router’s main usage, and What is the difference between ONU and Router. Let’s take a closer look ! Part I. Meaning of...
0
9254
Oralloy
by: Oralloy | last post by:
Hello folks, I am unable to find appropriate documentation on the type promotion of bit-fields when using the generalised comparison operator "<=>". The problem is that using the GNU compilers, it seems that the internal comparison operator "<=>" tries to promote arguments from unsigned to signed. This is as boiled down as I can make it. Here is my compilation command: g++-12 -std=c++20 -Wnarrowing bit_field.cpp Here is the code in...
0
9122
jinu1996
by: jinu1996 | last post by:
In today's digital age, having a compelling online presence is paramount for businesses aiming to thrive in a competitive landscape. At the heart of this digital strategy lies an intricately woven tapestry of website design and digital marketing. It's not merely about having a website; it's about crafting an immersive digital experience that captivates audiences and drives business growth. The Art of Business Website Design Your website is...
0
7872
agi2029
by: agi2029 | last post by:
Let's talk about the concept of autonomous AI software engineers and no-code agents. These AIs are designed to manage the entire lifecycle of a software development project—planning, coding, testing, and deployment—without human intervention. Imagine an AI that can take a project description, break it down, write the code, debug it, and then launch it, all on its own.... Now, this would greatly impact the work of software developers. The idea...
0
5923
by: conductexam | last post by:
I have .net C# application in which I am extracting data from word file and save it in database particularly. To store word all data as it is I am converting the whole word file firstly in HTML and then checking html paragraph one by one. At the time of converting from word file to html my equations which are in the word document file was convert into image. Globals.ThisAddIn.Application.ActiveDocument.Select();...
0
4433
by: TSSRALBI | last post by:
Hello I'm a network technician in training and I need your help. I am currently learning how to create and manage the different types of VPNs and I have a question about LAN-to-LAN VPNs. The last exercise I practiced was to create a LAN-to-LAN VPN between two Pfsense firewalls, by using IPSEC protocols. I succeeded, with both firewalls in the same network. But I'm wondering if it's possible to do the same thing, with 2 Pfsense firewalls...
1
3125
by: 6302768590 | last post by:
Hai team i want code for transfer the data from one system to another through IP address by using C# our system has to for every 5mins then we have to update the data what the data is updated we have to send another system
2
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muto222
by: muto222 | last post by:
How can i add a mobile payment intergratation into php mysql website.
3
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bsmnconsultancy
by: bsmnconsultancy | last post by:
In today's digital era, a well-designed website is crucial for businesses looking to succeed. Whether you're a small business owner or a large corporation in Toronto, having a strong online presence can significantly impact your brand's success. BSMN Consultancy, a leader in Website Development in Toronto offers valuable insights into creating effective websites that not only look great but also perform exceptionally well. In this comprehensive...

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