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Future of access?

Hi

What future does access have after the release of vs 2005/sql 2005? MS
doesn't seem to have done anything major with access lately and presumably
hoping that everyone migrates to vs/sql.

Any comments?

Thanks

Regards

Nov 13 '05
64 5172
SL> Seriously, would you suggest to a newcomer, someone who doesn't know
SL> VBA, ADO, ATL and the .NET Framework and who doesn't have to support a
SL> legacy application, to start learning these things instead of VB.NET,
SL> C# and ADO.NET ?

Depends on his purpose. If it is productive creating workhorse applications
with great performance, then yes. If being in sync with glossy magazines,
plus impressing job interviewers who know things from those magazines, then
no.

Vadim Rapp

Nov 13 '05 #11
Per "Sylvain Lafontaine" <sylvain aei ca (fill the blanks, no spam please)>:
Seriously, would you suggest to a newcomer, someone who doesn't know VBA,
ADO, ATL and the .NET Framework and who doesn't have to support a legacy
application, to start learning these things instead of VB.NET, C# and
ADO.NET ?


Absolutely not. I don't need or want any more competition in my (to me, at
least) lucrative niche of providing low-cost, quickly-delivered solutions for
clients who need same. -)

VB.NET *really* eats up the manhours.
--
PeteCresswell
Nov 13 '05 #12
"Sylvain Lafontaine" <sylvain aei ca (fill the blanks, no spam
please)> wrote in news:ef******** ******@TK2MSFTN GP14.phx.gbl:
Excerpt for the SQL part, the development of fancy stuff in Access
are mainly based on three things: VBA, Recordsets and ActiveX
(COM/DCOM).


What the *hell* do you mean by "recordsets "? EVERY database
application will be operating on recordsets of one form or another.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.bway.net/~dfenton
dfenton at bway dot net http://www.bway.net/~dfassoc
Nov 13 '05 #13
By "recordsets ", I'm referring to the DAO and ADO implementations of
recordsets in comparaison with the datasets of the .NET framework. In
ADO.NET, the recordsets are so different from their DAO and ADO counterparts
that MS has changed their name to Dataset.

My statement about "recordsets " may look strange at first but if you take a
look at ADO.NET, the answer will become obvious. This is why I didn't give
any further explanation in my other post.

--
Sylvain Lafontaine, ing.
MVP - Technologies Virtual-PC
E-mail: http://cerbermail.com/?QugbLEWINF
"David W. Fenton" <dX********@bwa y.net.invalid> wrote in message
news:Xn******** *************** ***********@24. 168.128.74...
"Sylvain Lafontaine" <sylvain aei ca (fill the blanks, no spam
please)> wrote in news:ef******** ******@TK2MSFTN GP14.phx.gbl:
Excerpt for the SQL part, the development of fancy stuff in Access
are mainly based on three things: VBA, Recordsets and ActiveX
(COM/DCOM).


What the *hell* do you mean by "recordsets "? EVERY database
application will be operating on recordsets of one form or another.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.bway.net/~dfenton
dfenton at bway dot net http://www.bway.net/~dfassoc

Nov 13 '05 #14
"Sylvain Lafontaine" <sylvain aei ca (fill the blanks, no spam
please)> wrote in news:uw******** ******@TK2MSFTN GP15.phx.gbl:
By "recordsets ", I'm referring to the DAO and ADO implementations
of recordsets in comparaison with the datasets of the .NET
framework. In ADO.NET, the recordsets are so different from their
DAO and ADO counterparts that MS has changed their name to
Dataset.

My statement about "recordsets " may look strange at first but if
you take a look at ADO.NET, the answer will become obvious. This
is why I didn't give any further explanation in my other post.


You sound a lot like a garden-variety moron who selects the most
recent Microsoft technology just because Microsoft says it's coming
next. Those who did that with ADO after the release of Access 2000
got badly burned, so I think it highly unlikely that any experienced
Access developer would be anxious to start on whatever Microsoft
says is the latest and greatest, and that includes all the .NET
lunacy, which really isn't designed for the same problem space in
which Access excels.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.bway.net/~dfenton
dfenton at bway dot net http://www.bway.net/~dfassoc
Nov 13 '05 #15
Just in case you didn't know, you're not obligated to take part in this
discussion.

--
Sylvain Lafontaine, ing.
MVP - Technologies Virtual-PC
E-mail: http://cerbermail.com/?QugbLEWINF
"David W. Fenton" <dX********@bwa y.net.invalid> wrote in message
news:Xn******** *************** ***********@24. 168.128.86...
"Sylvain Lafontaine" <sylvain aei ca (fill the blanks, no spam
please)> wrote in news:uw******** ******@TK2MSFTN GP15.phx.gbl:
By "recordsets ", I'm referring to the DAO and ADO implementations
of recordsets in comparaison with the datasets of the .NET
framework. In ADO.NET, the recordsets are so different from their
DAO and ADO counterparts that MS has changed their name to
Dataset.

My statement about "recordsets " may look strange at first but if
you take a look at ADO.NET, the answer will become obvious. This
is why I didn't give any further explanation in my other post.


You sound a lot like a garden-variety moron who selects the most
recent Microsoft technology just because Microsoft says it's coming
next. Those who did that with ADO after the release of Access 2000
got badly burned, so I think it highly unlikely that any experienced
Access developer would be anxious to start on whatever Microsoft
says is the latest and greatest, and that includes all the .NET
lunacy, which really isn't designed for the same problem space in
which Access excels.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.bway.net/~dfenton
dfenton at bway dot net http://www.bway.net/~dfassoc

Nov 13 '05 #16
Well just to add my 2 cents, having been programming in C#.Net for the last
8 months or so..

The "dataset" in .Net is not equivalent to a recordset at all. A dataset
can, however, contain several datatables, each of which is more like the
disconnected recordset idea. You fill a datatable with data from a query or
stored procedure. After optionally manipulating the data in a datatable, it
can be used to update the data in the database.

Anne
"Sylvain Lafontaine" <sylvain aei ca (fill the blanks, no spam please)>
wrote in message news:uw******** ******@TK2MSFTN GP15.phx.gbl...
By "recordsets ", I'm referring to the DAO and ADO implementations of
recordsets in comparaison with the datasets of the .NET framework. In
ADO.NET, the recordsets are so different from their DAO and ADO
counterparts that MS has changed their name to Dataset.

My statement about "recordsets " may look strange at first but if you take
a look at ADO.NET, the answer will become obvious. This is why I didn't
give any further explanation in my other post.

--
Sylvain Lafontaine, ing.
MVP - Technologies Virtual-PC
E-mail: http://cerbermail.com/?QugbLEWINF
"David W. Fenton" <dX********@bwa y.net.invalid> wrote in message
news:Xn******** *************** ***********@24. 168.128.74...
"Sylvain Lafontaine" <sylvain aei ca (fill the blanks, no spam
please)> wrote in news:ef******** ******@TK2MSFTN GP14.phx.gbl:
Excerpt for the SQL part, the development of fancy stuff in Access
are mainly based on three things: VBA, Recordsets and ActiveX
(COM/DCOM).


What the *hell* do you mean by "recordsets "? EVERY database
application will be operating on recordsets of one form or another.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.bway.net/~dfenton
dfenton at bway dot net http://www.bway.net/~dfassoc


Nov 13 '05 #17
David W. Fenton wrote:
"You sound a lot like a garden-variety moron who selects the most
recent Microsoft technology just because Microsoft says it's coming
next. Those who did that with ADO after the release of Access 2000
got badly burned...."
--
I started to use ADO in 1998. I have not been burned with ADO. I do not
know of anyone who has been burned with ADO. I invite all ADO burnees
to state the nature of their burns and the specific ADO causes of them
here in CDMA.

Learning a new technology can be frustrating and time consuming. These,
together with a notion that I may wish to leave Microsoft programs,
have deterred me from advancing very far into the .NET technolgies. But
I expect that should I do so, I will find many strengths and
advantages.

I think it is fair to beginners who use this group to avoid denigrating
technologies which I have not used extensively.

Nov 13 '05 #18
There is a future for Access, VBA, DAO, ADO *and* .Net products. Technology
is so prevalent in so many types of organizations, with so many different
needs, that there is room and a need for the full range of technologies, old
and new.

I question the experience of anyone who thinks that the most popular desktop
database in the world is going die out in the near future, or that VBA is
dead.

I question the experience of anyone that does not realize the potential in
learning and implementing the latest Microsoft's latest technologies, such
as .Net.

I know of some very high-end sophisticated work being built on Access, but
also of some very sophisticated clients who require the use of .Net for
product development.

And then there is Visual FoxPro which still has a good, dedicated developers
base. This is old technology that was suppose to die out years ago. The
most resent version (VFP 9) was just released, and includes new reporting
technology that is not even included in any of Microsoft's other product
lines. Go figure.

Steven R. Zuch
Cogent Management Inc.

"David W. Fenton" <dX********@bwa y.net.invalid> wrote in message
news:Xn******** *************** ***********@24. 168.128.86...
"Sylvain Lafontaine" <sylvain aei ca (fill the blanks, no spam
please)> wrote in news:uw******** ******@TK2MSFTN GP15.phx.gbl:
By "recordsets ", I'm referring to the DAO and ADO implementations
of recordsets in comparaison with the datasets of the .NET
framework. In ADO.NET, the recordsets are so different from their
DAO and ADO counterparts that MS has changed their name to
Dataset.

My statement about "recordsets " may look strange at first but if
you take a look at ADO.NET, the answer will become obvious. This
is why I didn't give any further explanation in my other post.


You sound a lot like a garden-variety moron who selects the most
recent Microsoft technology just because Microsoft says it's coming
next. Those who did that with ADO after the release of Access 2000
got badly burned, so I think it highly unlikely that any experienced
Access developer would be anxious to start on whatever Microsoft
says is the latest and greatest, and that includes all the .NET
lunacy, which really isn't designed for the same problem space in
which Access excels.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.bway.net/~dfenton
dfenton at bway dot net http://www.bway.net/~dfassoc

Nov 13 '05 #19
Hello.
I think that there are some latent potentials of Access to be great
universal front-end RAD. I supposse it is possible to achieve great progress
even with old technologies such as DAO and ODBC, if some small modifications
are added such as passing parameters to saved pass-through queries.
"Steven Zuch" <st***@nospam.n et> je napisao u poruci interesnoj
grupi:6E******* *********@fe11. lga...
There is a future for Access, VBA, DAO, ADO *and* .Net products.
Technology is so prevalent in so many types of organizations, with so many
different needs, that there is room and a need for the full range of
technologies, old and new.

I question the experience of anyone who thinks that the most popular
desktop database in the world is going die out in the near future, or that
VBA is dead.

I question the experience of anyone that does not realize the potential in
learning and implementing the latest Microsoft's latest technologies, such
as .Net.

I know of some very high-end sophisticated work being built on Access, but
also of some very sophisticated clients who require the use of .Net for
product development.

And then there is Visual FoxPro which still has a good, dedicated
developers base. This is old technology that was suppose to die out years
ago. The most resent version (VFP 9) was just released, and includes new
reporting technology that is not even included in any of Microsoft's other
product lines. Go figure.

Steven R. Zuch
Cogent Management Inc.

"David W. Fenton" <dX********@bwa y.net.invalid> wrote in message
news:Xn******** *************** ***********@24. 168.128.86...
"Sylvain Lafontaine" <sylvain aei ca (fill the blanks, no spam
please)> wrote in news:uw******** ******@TK2MSFTN GP15.phx.gbl:
By "recordsets ", I'm referring to the DAO and ADO implementations
of recordsets in comparaison with the datasets of the .NET
framework. In ADO.NET, the recordsets are so different from their
DAO and ADO counterparts that MS has changed their name to
Dataset.

My statement about "recordsets " may look strange at first but if
you take a look at ADO.NET, the answer will become obvious. This
is why I didn't give any further explanation in my other post.


You sound a lot like a garden-variety moron who selects the most
recent Microsoft technology just because Microsoft says it's coming
next. Those who did that with ADO after the release of Access 2000
got badly burned, so I think it highly unlikely that any experienced
Access developer would be anxious to start on whatever Microsoft
says is the latest and greatest, and that includes all the .NET
lunacy, which really isn't designed for the same problem space in
which Access excels.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.bway.net/~dfenton
dfenton at bway dot net http://www.bway.net/~dfassoc


Nov 13 '05 #20

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